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cbarnes

Recommendation For Mask To Make Glazes, And How To Make Environment Safe

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Id like to start trying my hand at making glazes.  my first question is if anyone has a recommendation on a mask.  also, we have cats, and i do all of my pottery in the garage, i'm concerned the powder would drift onto surfaces and they could get sick by walking on it??  any recommendations on a safe work environment for mixing? 

 

thank you

 

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I have had many cats over the years and they all come into my studio and they are just fine -one lived 19 years with clay think mask for you and not worry about the cats.

Try a mask search on main forum as this has been covered well.

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This is the mask I use: http://amzn.com/B000FTEDMM

 

I think its pretty standard. Just be aware if your a male you need to have a clean shave to make sure the mask is working effectively. Also it needs to be tight on the face so that when your blow air non escapes around your face and only out the vent. As far as environment the link Bruce left is very good.

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It's mentioned in the link Bruce provided, but P-100 filters for a

respirator are a must. Also, I'm a firm believer in a good air filter for any workspace where you do dry mixing. May seem like common sense to some, but I've definitely seen a few people mix up a glaze with respirator on, move 10 feet away, take respirator off, and continue working.

 

I'm a big fan of the full face cover respirators with powered air supply. Spends, but comfortable.

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I am a retired veterinarian and have spent some time thinking about the issue of pets in the clay studio.  Most people that let their animals in to the studio will tell you that sooner or later some mishap will occur...usually ruined pots.  My favorite one is when the dog steps on the wheel pedal and the pot goes flying.  It is for that reason alone that I don't let my animals into my studio.

As to health issues, dogs and cats really don't live long enough to experience the chronic health problems that people can get from working with clay.  Since the main issue is with airborne particulates, if you practice good studio hygiene for your own sake, that will certainly be sufficient for your animals.  I would probably not let the cat hang around with me when I was creating a lot of clay dust, or powdered glaze dust.

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Guest JBaymore

Quick excerpts from my toxicology section handout from the class I teach on that at the college:

 

As in most things that studio artists face when it comes to health and safety issues, we typically don't KNOW the contaminant level when we are doing various activities like clay body of glaze mixing.  So the prudent approach is to err on the side of caution.  (Is the gun loaded?)

 

General recommendation:  P-100 / HEPA filter for getting as much nasty stuff out of the air as possible.  Half face mask for the higher Protection Factor given that the EL is not known.

 

There are well researched standards for dealing with this issue in an occupational setting.  Being a studio artist, this IS an occupational setting.  They come from OSHA.

 

See here:  https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id=22737

 

Note that if you have studio employees you are supposed to KNOW the exposure levels to even begin to deal with this stuff.

 

Then there is this: http://www.silica-safe.org/regulations-and-requirements/osha

 

The respirator must FIT.  Very important.  If it doesn't, you think you are protected... and you aren't.  It is worse than knowing you are not at all protected.

 

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=9780

 

 

Hope that is useful.

 

 

best,

 

......................john

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I am a retired veterinarian and have spent some time thinking about the issue of pets in the clay studio.  Most people that let their animals in to the studio will tell you that sooner or later some mishap will occur...usually ruined pots.  My favorite one is when the dog steps on the wheel pedal and the pot goes flying.  It is for that reason alone that I don't let my animals into my studio.

As to health issues, dogs and cats really don't live long enough to experience the chronic health problems that people can get from working with clay.  Since the main issue is with airborne particulates, if you practice good studio hygiene for your own sake, that will certainly be sufficient for your animals.  I would probably not let the cat hang around with me when I was creating a lot of clay dust, or powdered glaze dust.

 

thank you for reassuring me about the cats.  I have had the paw prints on a platter... thought it was a fun accident actually.  but I've had enough ruined that we have taken steps to keep them away from finished pieces.  they stay away when I'm on the wheel fortunately.  i'll keep them out when we are mixing glazes and wipe up as much as possible, sounds like that should be sufficient.

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r a male you need to have a clean shave to make sure the mask is working effectively. 

 

And if you're female none will fit you properly.  

 

Worse if you wear specs and want safety glasses on at the same time.

 

Try and find somewhere you can try before you buy.

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Guest JBaymore

If you have a "hard to fit" face...... purchase from a safety equipment specialty supplier.

 

Notice the size pulldown on this mask frame linked below.  They do come in sizes.  Usually the women students have no trouble eventually finding a good fit.

 

https://www.northernsafety.com/Product/5208/MSA-Comfo-Classic-Half-Mask-Respirator

 

best,

 

.......................john

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I have four of these installed in my studio to circulate and replace the air. If all four are on at the same time, it completely replaces the air about every 60 seconds. Not a substitute for wearing a mask, but it stops particulates from accumulating. In addition, keeps the heat down during the summer, and vents gases released during firings. Let me repeat- not a substitute for wearing a mask.

 

 

 

I turn on all four when I am cleaning, including two 3600CF floor fans- which means the air is turning over every 20 seconds. Yes mother, I am wearing a full respirator when I am cleaning.

 

Nerd

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I used to spray epoxy paint, respirator required or death by chemical hardening of the lungs.... a clean shaved face is a must to pass a smoke test...  Get the absolute best you can afford, even if you have to save up to purchase it... Its the most important piece of equipment you will ever own...

 

I am fond of a full face respirator just because accidents happen and you dont want anything in your eyes as well as your lungs or facial skin "pores etc."

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Crusty:

 

Given your background- then you will also agree an emergency eye wash station is a good idea as well. I had a 3-M particulate mask on when I was walking around jobs where the dry-wallers and painters were working. Dry wall hangers put out a dust cloud for sure.

 

Nerd

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This is what I use.  

http://www.envirosafetyproducts.com/3m-7500-series-half-facepiece-asbestos-abatement-respirator-assembly.html

 

P-100 filters, easy to breathe, available in 3 sizes.  Envirosafety has excellent prices and ships fast.

 

Wipe down your respirator after mixing glazes and store it in a ziplock bag between use.  You don't want it sitting around in an open studio gathering dust.

 

-SD

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This is the mask I use: http://amzn.com/B000FTEDMM

 

I think its pretty standard. Just be aware if your a male you need to have a clean shave to make sure the mask is working effectively. Also it needs to be tight on the face so that when your blow air non escapes around your face and only out the vent. As far as environment the link Bruce left is very good.

 

purchased this one.. thank you!!

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