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Are you using glazes from "Mastering Cone 6 Glazes" ?

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I have several of these glazes and would appreciate other potter's feedback on their work with these recipies. Like, "Is this glaze super sensitive to temperature variations." Or, Has this glaze ever pinholed on you? Or, Which ones have you found most dependable? Things like that.

 

Right now the one I am trying is called Carribean Sea Green.

Anybody?

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This is an excellent book for ^6 electric firings as well as a great book for grasping glaze technology.

SInce the original publication many potters have used the glazes in the book and developed firing skills to go with them. Firing down or slow cooling is one very good example.

Soaking for 20-30 minutes at the peak temperature is also a common practice. For pinhole problems there are separate issues...

are you washing the bisque, dampening it so it is not super absorbent. What temperature of bisque (the moderate has his opinions on this as well.)?

When I was working in a co-op, some potters used several of these glazes. Licorice, oatmeal, bone, variegated blue were the most popular ones.

 

Marcia

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Spring,

 

One thing is for sure, John Hesselberth and Ron Roy know glazes. It's a great book for learning about glazes so you can solve problems, make changes, create your own glazes and maybe even reconsider the safety of some of the liner glazes you use. It includes some tried and true glaze formulas but don't expect it to be a cone 6 version of Britt's High-Fire Glazes with tons of glaze formulas and lots of colorful pictures.

 

Jim

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I have several of these glazes and would appreciate other potter's feedback on their work with these recipies. Like, "Is this glaze super sensitive to temperature variations." Or, Hase this glaze ever pinholed on you. Or Which ones have you found most dependable? Things like that.

 

Right now the one I am trying is called Carribean Sea Green.

Anybody?

 

Another ceramics community on-line is the Electric Cone 6 Mid Fire Potters, they have teams that research and test different glazes and then post the results, I believe they have done a lot of work with glazes from Mastering Cone 6 glazes. It's a great site for those who work with Cone 6 oxidation glazes, I think cone6pots.ning.com will get you to it, I'm not great at computers so you may have to do a search. Denice

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I have several of these glazes and would appreciate other potter's feedback on their work with these recipies. Like, "Is this glaze super sensitive to temperature variations." Or, Hase this glaze ever pinholed on you. Or Which ones have you found most dependable? Things like that.

 

Right now the one I am trying is called Carribean Sea Green.

Anybody?

 

 

When the book came out, I snapped it up immediately. I used several of the glazes from the book, and altered some of the oxides to get some different colors I liked. One, a faux celedon works well for me. I highly recommend it to anyone doing their own work in glazes-heck even the area of simple glaze stability tests is worth the book price itself.

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Another ceramics community on-line is the Electric Cone 6 Mid Fire Potters, they have teams that research and test different glazes and then post the results, I believe they have done a lot of work with glazes from Mastering Cone 6 glazes. It's a great site for those who work with Cone 6 oxidation glazes, I think cone6pots.ning.com will get you to it, I'm not great at computers so you may have to do a search. Denice

 

 

Denise, thanks for website info!

 

Jim

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I've used the Waterfall Brown a little and like it although haven't quite got the application down good yet.

Just mixed up a batch of the Glossy Clear #2 but haven't fired it yet.

The book is good for glaze basics but I personally like more info on how different ingredients affect the glaze.

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I've used the Waterfall Brown a little and like it although haven't quite got the application down good yet.

Just mixed up a batch of the Glossy Clear #2 but haven't fired it yet.

The book is good for glaze basics but I personally like more info on how different ingredients affect the glaze.

 

 

I think the book is great. Not too deep for me, who flunked chemistry in college, but still real solid info.

I use lots of the glazes and find MOST of them quite dependable, but I have found that even with the author's recommended down firing, I still get shinier results than I expected from the pics and text. Wondered if any of you have suggestions.

They do mention in the text that some of the glazes are very temp sensitive, and I have found that to be true.

 

Mark, Waterfall dipped over licorice can be spectacular. also good over varigated blue, my most favorite glaze of all. so many ways to get different effects with it. thick, it's blue, thin can be warm brown almost caramel. Waterfall om porcelain is lovely, spray a not too heavy coat.

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I certainly didn't mean to criticize the book at all. It was money well spent.

Sometimes I just like to know how you got from here to there.

I did mix up up a test batch of the licorice also and am eager to try.

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tongue.gif Yo, Mark, there are SOOOO many times I wish I knew how I got from here to there.wink.gif

 

Licorice looks like pattened leather shoes. Black as night and shiney. Doesn't run, and the glaze slop WILL stain your hands and clothes, so much iron oxide. Great glaze for food serving pots. Other M^6 Glaze that goes over it really well is Clear Powder Blue, at the rim, good runs and colors.

I want to know why some of the glazes that the books says are satin come outr really glossy in my kiln with the correct cones and slow down firing like the book recommends?

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tongue.gif Yo, Mark, there are SOOOO many times I wish I knew how I got from here to there.wink.gif

 

Licorice looks like pattened leather shoes. Black as night and shiney. Doesn't run, and the glaze slop WILL stain your hands and clothes, so much iron oxide. Great glaze for food serving pots. Other M^6 Glaze that goes over it really well is Clear Powder Blue, at the rim, good runs and colors.

I want to know why some of the glazes that the books says are satin come outr really glossy in my kiln with the correct cones and slow down firing like the book recommends?

 

 

maybe it is your clay making the difference.

Marcia

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Mark, MC6G is about making "good" glazes that fit and don't leach. I had the same problem you did... the book assumes you know the basics. It's Glaze 201, if you will.

 

Glaze 101 is, in my opinion, Glazes Cone 6, by Michael Bailey. It requires a step by step approach to how to construct a glaze and perform experiments. It's Euro-centric, but you just have to know that US potters don't rely on zinc so much.

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I'm working with the High Calcium Semi-matte Base 1... Variegated Slate Blue, Oatmeal, etc. the one load I've done shows that it doesn't move much at all and it's very sensitive to thickness... drips and runs from dipping show very badly.

 

I am getting the semi-matte surface through slow cooling though, with only cones as my guide.

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Yo, Carl,

That is the base that the book says is the most matt of all in the book. I have the semi matt green blue, and sometimes it is matt and some times it is darker and more shiney. Is yours matt when thin and dark green and shinier when thicker?

 

I had run marks with it untill I bisqued to ^05,(1910*) that stopped it.

 

What cooling rate are you using? I follow the book, drop from peak 500* hr to 1900*, then 125* hour to 1600, soak 30 min, then off. Sometimes the glazes are way more shiney than I want.

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Another ceramics community on-line is the Electric Cone 6 Mid Fire Potters, they have teams that research and test different glazes and then post the results, I believe they have done a lot of work with glazes from Mastering Cone 6 glazes. It's a great site for those who work with Cone 6 oxidation glazes, I think cone6pots.ning.com will get you to it, I'm not great at computers so you may have to do a search. Denice

 

 

Denise, thanks for website info!

 

Jim

 

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I joined this group for a while in early spring-summer 2011. Frankly, there was not not much current uploading going on in the forum discussing glazes aside from members having posted some exquisite work. General impression is that it seemed to take on the aspect of an archive of past work. It was out of date. Some of the on going comments in other forums were a tad bit naive, like citing "blue rutile" as an ingredient in a glaze formula. Oh, Moderator, where art thou? And folks who use commercial glazes -- and bleat on about troubles and difficulties in application and firing -- just don't particularly rock it for me. That's my personal opinion, and I know ceramics is a "broad church" with room for all sorts. But, like a lot of potters, I choose to expend time and energy in particular ways and not spin my wheels. I do consult M^6G and have had some very pleasing results. I pay attention to a slow down fire for particular glazes, and a faster one as well. All this information is out there for the taking, consult every website mentioned in M^6G. It will pay you dividends. I use various clay bodies, too, which makes a huge difference to the glaze results. I also fire at ^8/9 oxidation, but with a differing suite of glazes. I've taken a break from clayart@LSV.ceramics.org for a while, but their archives are extensive, and any serious online query is usually met with intelligence, but be aware that there are exceptions to the rule with some who ride a particular hobby-horse to make particular/sideways points. I think investing in good ceramics reference books at every opportunity will serve one well. I regularly read through my ceramics library. I have no telly. At the end of the day, I simply kick back with a glass of wine and read and make notes about possibilities. Augmenting one's basic knowledge via on-line discussion groups needs to be tempered by basic knowledge and good practice. As in most things in life: It's the formation of the question you ask.

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I have been to that web sites, found the same impression. Now a rather dead site, and VERY hard to navigate. I joined this spring also, but wandered away. Lots of show and not so much tell.

I am hoping this board will support a discussion of this subject, with willingness to share results that Carl and others are showing. smile.gif

 

Dinah, It's great to know you are getting "very pleasing results". Which of the M^6 glazes are your favorites?I've posted my cool down and opened a discussion of what results I'm getting, how slow are you cooling ?

Hoping Carl will come back in on this.

 

I, too read everything, and use several different clays. I see different glaze colors with the different clays, but don't see differences as to matt or gloss from the different clays. I do see a difference if I mix glazes with my well water rather than city water that less acidic.

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Mark, MC6G is about making "good" glazes that fit and don't leach. I had the same problem you did... the book assumes you know the basics. It's Glaze 201, if you will.

 

Glaze 101 is, in my opinion, Glazes Cone 6, by Michael Bailey. It requires a step by step approach to how to construct a glaze and perform experiments. It's Euro-centric, but you just have to know that US potters don't rely on zinc so much.

 

 

I also like the Bailey book. I purchased it at the same time as I got the Mastering Cone 6 Glazes. The two of them complement each other quite well I believe. However, I think the that the MC6G is a little more concerned with glaze durability and safety in functional ware.

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This is my Damp Ware Start/Slow Down Firing schedule for ^6. Bear in mind that if your ware is bone dry then you can omit and or adjust the .60 hold in Segment 1. I've had an excellent melt from top to bottom and I do stagger my shelving placement by at least 2" to allow for heat movement throughout the kiln. I place a pack of Orton cones ^5^6^7 on btm/middle/top shelves. Without fail. Do the usual placement in front of a spyhole and not much around ware to affect melt. Use properly tinted safety glasses easily obtainable on Amazon. There's plenty of advise about how to inspect witness cones out there. Find it and follow instructions. To the letter.

 

What follows is my program in Centigrade. I practiced in the UK for over 25 years and just can't visualize fahrenheit without a calculator and formula in my hand. Find a conversion table and do the numbers for yourself. This works for me in my Skutt 1027. I bisque to ^04: hold for .20' and in glazing usually hold my dip for 6 to 12 count unless it's a stinker of a glaze and wants a thin app. I adore the glazes from M6^G and the Bailey ^6 book. Huge room for experiment and tweaking. I am also a huge fan of wood ash glazes and regularly tweak and work out the best one ever! :D

 

Segment 1: Rate 65/Temp 93/Hold .60

Segment 2: Rate 204/Temp1065/Hold 00

Segment 3: Rate 65/Temp 1200/Hold .30

Segment 4: Rate 148/Temp 1010/Hold 00

Segment 5: Rate 148/Temp 982/Hold .20

Segment 6: Rate 70/Temp 843/ Hold 00

 

Well, it all looks a tad bit eccentric but it works for me and my kiln. That's what's important.

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Good to hear back from you, Dinah.

Sounds like we are doing similar firing schedules, I also use the skutt 1027. Always use cone packs, and get pretty even results. something I just did last firing was cut the outer 1" off of 2 1/2 shelves so I could spread them apart in the center when used as the top shelf. It is often too cool in my kiln. It really made a difference and made the top temp cones the same as the middle and bottom cones.

 

I am interestd in how long you dip pieces, 6-12 count. Wow! Do you have your glazes pretty thin? If I held mine in that long I would have glop. I adjust mine to where my cuticles show up as soon as I lift my hand out odf the bucket, not a very technical comment, I know, but the way I was shown by my teacher. But then, maybe you count faster than I do. I agree that bisque to 04 is important for nice surfaces at ^6.

 

Last firing I put a 30 min hold at 1900* going down, and then dropped 125*/hour down to 16oo* with a 15 minute hold there before off. Best glaze complexity so far, and matts looked not so shiney.

Sorry, I don't speak Centigrade, just Farenheit.

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This is my Damp Ware Start/Slow Down Firing schedule for ^6. Bear in mind that if your ware is bone dry then you can omit and or adjust the .60 hold in Segment 1. I've had an excellent melt from top to bottom and I do stagger my shelving placement by at least 2" to allow for heat movement throughout the kiln. I place a pack of Orton cones ^5^6^7 on btm/middle/top shelves. Without fail. Do the usual placement in front of a spyhole and not much around ware to affect melt. Use properly tinted safety glasses easily obtainable on Amazon. There's plenty of advise about how to inspect witness cones out there. Find it and follow instructions. To the letter.

 

What follows is my program in Centigrade. I practiced in the UK for over 25 years and just can't visualize fahrenheit without a calculator and formula in my hand. Find a conversion table and do the numbers for yourself. This works for me in my Skutt 1027. I bisque to ^04: hold for .20' and in glazing usually hold my dip for 6 to 12 count unless it's a stinker of a glaze and wants a thin app. I adore the glazes from M6^G and the Bailey ^6 book. Huge room for experiment and tweaking. I am also a huge fan of wood ash glazes and regularly tweak and work out the best one ever! biggrin.gif

 

Segment 1: Rate 65/Temp 93/Hold .60

Segment 2: Rate 204/Temp1065/Hold 00

Segment 3: Rate 65/Temp 1200/Hold .30

Segment 4: Rate 148/Temp 1010/Hold 00

Segment 5: Rate 148/Temp 982/Hold .20

Segment 6: Rate 70/Temp 843/ Hold 00

 

Well, it all looks a tad bit eccentric but it works for me and my kiln. That's what's important.

 

 

 

Hello Dinah,

I'm fairly new at this site. And I am not sure how I can word the question to ask, but I note that you are using Orton cones and thankfully use centigrade (I am in the UK ) . I was under the impression that cone 6 is around 1222c, but I have noticed in some articles cone 6 could be 1200c or even less and I think that is what you are saying above???

 

Q: Is this something to do with the rate you reach the cone temp? As you can see I am new to this as well as the forum and mainly self taught and as much as I like experimenting I am getting frustrated with trying to find some answers! unsure.gif Hopefully you can shed some light on it for me. I ask as I have a new electric top loading kiln and things are not coming out of the kiln quite as I expected or how they did in the old kiln, and I dont have the knowledge to find out why .... Something to do with 'heat work' but that's a grey area too!

 

I have never held temp on cooling, so thats something else to 'have a go at' .... frustrating but exciting too rolleyes.gif

 

Your message has already thrown light and info onto aspects thats I had not considered, so, many thanks

Joy

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These are 'Mastering Cone 6' glazes. Variegated Slate Blue, Raspberry, Bone and Spearmint. From Saturday's load. I've tested a good selection, love some and, well, 'don't love' others!

 

Alice

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I bought my first electric kiln last spring so since then I've been learning how to make cone 6 glazes and firing them. I posted some pictures in my gallery. I've made waterfall brown, licorcie, spearmint, and one of the blues from this book. I tried the whites but didn't like the results. I fired bisque to 06 and a friend suggested I fire it hotter because I've had some pinholing problems. Since I'm using a variety of clay I bought years ago in Tacoma WA I assume it might be the clay. This next batch I will bisque to 05 and put a hold like it suggests in the book and see if that helps.

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I bought my first electric kiln last spring so since then I've been learning how to make cone 6 glazes and firing them. I posted some pictures in my gallery. I've made waterfall brown, licorcie, spearmint, and one of the blues from this book. I tried the whites but didn't like the results. I fired bisque to 06 and a friend suggested I fire it hotter because I've had some pinholing problems. Since I'm using a variety of clay I bought years ago in Tacoma WA I assume it might be the clay. This next batch I will bisque to 05 and put a hold like it suggests in the book and see if that helps.

 

 

I had drip and run marks and pin holing at ^06, when I changed to 1910*, which is sort of ^05 all that stopped.

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