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Can't Rub Anything But India Ink Into Cone 5 Clear Crackle Glaze

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I can't rub anything but india ink into Cone 5 clear crackle glaze.

Actually i have third firing in mind - after I rub say iron oxide wash into crackles, so it become permanent. But anything I tried (iron oxide, stains, overglazes) won't stay after I wipe them with paper towel. Where's the problem?

 

Thanks!

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I am not sure but probably twofold , the particle size might not be fine enough to penetrate beyond the surface , and it might need more time to soak in. Maybe try mortar a pestle, and/or making a solution that won't dry fast eg gum Arabic or glycerin. Leave it on longer wetter and finer. India ink is very very fine , that's what gives it its opacity, plus it is in a lawyer ( or something similar) base, which binds to the porous surface

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This may upset some of the purists here, but years ago when I thought crackle was so cool, I used india ink, then looking for something different tried some washes with acrylic paint that I had watered down. It worked quite well and allowed me to have colored crackle. However the black seemed to hold up very well. Wiping is a bit of a problem, but if it gets too dry, a little bit of a scuffy pad would work to remove the excess. Back then I would cut the pads of the school buffers that were thrown out to make a cleaner pad. These also worked well for all sorts of greenware cleanup, and for scrubbing tables and ware boards when wet.

 

 

best,

Pres

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Someone I worked with used to use a permanent black sharpie magic marker to highlight the crackle glaze on his pots (exterior only). Whatever solvent is in the ink really gets down into the cracks and the marker is not too difficult to wipe off the surface of the pot. I do not think that the color will survive through another firing, though.

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One thing you could try is using a hot pot so it is slightly expanded and the crazing cracks are a bit wider - take them out of the kiln a bit earlier, or heat them up on top of the kiln when doing your next firing. Also, if you can, ball mill the glaze so it is as fine as possible.

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