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Steph555

Looking For Matte Earthtone Glazes- Cone 6

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Hi, I'm new.  Newly set up studio in garage...connected the kiln, focusing on tiles, still learning.

I work with Standard 420 and 547 clay with lots of grog, and will fire to cone 6.  I want to make some really earthy matte floor tiles, and am having a hard time finding matte glazes.  The color range I am interested in is cream, burnt sienna , terra cotta (slightly pink?), earthy orange, mossy green, straw?.   Attached is a pic.with colors that I love, but it is on a cement tile.  Any suggestions on how to get this look- rustic texture and lovely variation on field tiles?   It would be cool if these glazes blended/layered nicely with each other.  Would they be sprayed on (I've never done that)?   What about colorants to the clay and a clear matte glaze on top.  I have little experience with colorants. 

 

I have never mixed my own glazes, but may be willing to learn (or have my local ceramic supplier mix them for me). 

Thanks very much.  Happy to have this forum!

Steph

post-72215-0-16012500-1446062165_thumb.jpg

post-72215-0-16012500-1446062165_thumb.jpg

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Find a good matt base and start testing colors. I'd recommend John Britt's book on Mid-range glazes which focuses on ^6. Another book where the glass also focus on ^6 is mastering 66 glazes by John Hesselbreth and Ron Roy. They are both ceramic engineers and focus on food safe glazes. 

Google a ^6 glaze called Nutmeg. It may be a good starting point.

 

Marcia

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marcia, nutmeg is glossy.

 

welcome, steph.  you might find that matte glazes are not sturdy enough for floors.  i can picture the glazes wearing through and making the floor look dirty after a few years.  if you like the look of the tiles in that brochure, ask the manufacturer if they are glazed at all.  that might be the color of the clay. 

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I think having 30-60% clay in the glaze will give you what I would call a dry glaze look like those tiles.

 

I use a 40% whiting 50% clay and 10 % frit glaze that looks quite similar but fired to cone 10 reduction. You could even go further and end up with more of a coloured slip than glaze.

 

To get the variation across the piece in electric cone6 you will need some nice layering.

 

I think this has 1% iron oxide but I can't exactly remember. Cone10 reduction.

IMG 7448

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If you want that sort of look, I'd be inclined to go at it with a few colours of terra sigillatta rather than glaze, and fire your clay to full maturity. I've known wood firings to make use of sig, so you won't make a melty mess or anything. I need to dig up my recipes for it, but I think there must be an article or 2 kicking around on CAD, or even in the forums here. I'll try and get some info for you in the next day or so.

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marcia, nutmeg is glossy.

 

welcome, steph.  you might find that matte glazes are not sturdy enough for floors.  i can picture the glazes wearing through and making the floor look dirty after a few years.  if you like the look of the tiles in that brochure, ask the manufacturer if they are glazed at all.  that might be the color of the clay. 

Yes, but the right color. One can learn from what colorants cause the colors. The texture can be adjusted. As I said, it is a starting point.

Today's Ceramic Art Daily Freebies has a free download for tips on Electric kiln firing and glazes recipes.

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/free-gifts/electric-kiln-firing-techniques-and-tips-inspiration-instruction-and-glaze-recipes-for-electric-ceramic-kilns/

 

 

Marcia

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I have a similar tile in my house it's called saltillo, I got it from Mexico.  It is single fired clay with no glaze a lot of the variations come from the placement in the gas or wood kiln and the way it is stacked and overlapped.  The tile is sealed before laying and then sealed after the installation.  If you are wanting to make tile for a room I would stick to the smallest room like a tiny bathroom.  Tiles for the walls would be a good start, floor tiles can get a little tricky.  I had a friend who made C6 tiles for a large kitchen and eating area.  About a year after have them professionally installed they started breaking, had to tear it out.  Good luck with your testing and start small.    Denice

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The first thing that came to my mind after seeing the pictures were ceramic stains.  Look up the Mason ceramic stains which can be mixed into the clay or applied as a underglaze prior to firing.  From experience with floor tiles it is best to have the color throughout the clay rather than just on the surface as wear from abrasive foot traffic can show with just a surface treatment.  

As far as the cracking goes this has a lot to do with what is under the tile.  Tiles over a wood base even thick plywood will crack as the undersurface moves.  Our main floor is 80% tile.  We have two layers of plywood plus a layer of cement board under the tile.  On our lower level the tile was floated with a concrete base.  In 14 years we only have line hair line crack in the tile that occured in the first month.  The crack lines up with seam between two pieces of cement board.

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