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Wipe-Away Black Staining


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I'm using a black underglaze wash for Mishima work on bisqued, white earthenware. When I sponge it off, (sponge just damp,) the wash stains badly in areas where I don't want it. I've tried waxing around the design, (okay but can't wax exactly due to the complexity of the design,) and sanding, (also just okay because the incised design is shallow.) Is there a brand of underglaze that doesn't stain when wiped back? Other suggestions? Thanks for the help.

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I just did this. Make sure your sponge is rinsed after every wipe and only use the clean part of the sponge once or you are just applying the wash back onto the piece and it wil smear more. I then sanded off the smeared areas, because no matter what you do there will be some, with coarse sandpaper. Its a lot of work but I haven't found any better way to do it either.

 

Paul

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I have seen multiple posts from others on this forum regarding a more precise way to apply.  You wax your design area first, carve through the wax then apply the stain.  It only sinks into the carving and beads up on the waxed area where you can easily wipe it away.

 

 

I have been doing this with my flower designs and it has saved me so much time and trouble, I wish I'd tried it sooner. Carissman, I would definitely recommend trying this! You can do the wax on leather hard and carve through for the design, or do it on bisqued ware too. 

 

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/pottery-making-techniques/ceramic-decorating-techniques/how-to-use-slip-inlay-with-wax-to-create-thin-lined-decoration-on-pottery/

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That's how I do thin black lines. Wax the area to be designed then carve through the wax, apply the black wipe it off. Works really well.

 

If you are doing Mishima why aren't you doing all of the work at the greenware stage. Just curious. When I do Mishima I start at leatherhard apply slip trailed designs and layers of colors scrape back the colors at bone dry stage (wear a mask).to reveal the final design. I Find it quite easy to remove all of the excess colors working at this stage unlike doing it after it is bisque fired. I'm just curious as to your technique and always interested in learning new ways of doing things.

 

T

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When I do Mishima I start at leatherhard apply slip trailed designs and layers of colors scrape back the colors at bone dry stage (wear a mask).to reveal the final design.

 

Ohhh is that how you do it ... I have been scraping off the excess when it's just set up and it's so smeary, I wondered what I was doing wrong ... I'm so clever. ;) 

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Thanks for the good ideas.  Here's the problem:  I'm impressing FEATHERS in soft earthenware, bisquing, and then using a wash of underglaze to emphasize the design. (Maybe that's not even mishima.) So the carve-through-wax technique, though great, isn't appropriate.  And I think the impression is too shallow to wash and then scrape back at the bone dry stage...but maybe.   Any other thoughts?  I have attached an image.

post-67111-0-23343300-1440861737_thumb.jpg

post-67111-0-23343300-1440861737_thumb.jpg

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Maybe one of these will work . . . https://www.google.com/search?q=fingerprint+brushes+and+powders&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CCsQsARqFQoTCPLLmuaLz8cCFccXPgodEV0EWA&biw=1600&bih=698I've not tried them, but they might be worth a try. Apply dry black mason stain to the fingerprint dusting brush and then dust the feather area; may take some practice to get the application right and you could always use a paper or flexible plastic outline of the feather to prevent stain from getting on adjacent areas. I think apply to greenware would offer the best luck for success as the dry stain would adhere to the damp surface and you then bisque the stain before applying glaze over it later. Plus, Mason stain has frit in it so it will be less likely to smudge after bisque firing. After bisque, you could also lightly sand any stain that got in areas outside the feather.

 

Applying fingerprint dust (or mason stain) is an art, a little dust goes a long way.

 

And, if you try this, be sure to wear an appropriate protective mask.

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This is what I was working on yesterday and explaining in my previous post. These are stretched pots and because of all the random cracks it was the only way I could deal with the black oxide wash. The second, darker one, still needs a little more sanding. The clear, glossy glaze will mask most of the slightly smudged areas.

 

Paul

post-61902-0-24159600-1440883280_thumb.jpg

post-61902-0-91247100-1440883293_thumb.jpg

post-61902-0-24159600-1440883280_thumb.jpg

post-61902-0-91247100-1440883293_thumb.jpg

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Haha! I have an idea, but it will probably ruin the feather. What would happen if you pressed the feather in, then waxed over and around it so that most of the area is masked off? Maybe try with a small feather on a small piece of clay. You can get the wax off the feather with hot water but not sure what it'll do to it.

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This might be strange and probably not work but.... That's never stopped a potter from trying something!

 

Have you thought of dusting the feather with dry black Mason stain then laying it on your piece and pressing it in with a rolling pin? The dry stain shouldn't damage the feather and by dusting the feather with it it should limit the amount of excess stain you have and hopefully not get all over the place. You would have to handle the stain dusted feather carefully. Oh and wear a mask please! Then by placing the "loaded" feather on your wet clay and rolling it in hopefully it will give you a nice feather pattern impressed in the clay and already colored.

 

Just an idea to maybe try unless you have already done so and it didn't work.

 

T

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The mishima technique on bisque ware is a bit easier as the carving can't get smudged or anything. If the colour is liquid enough, it should flow really easily into the carving (you do the print on raw clay of course, and then bisque-fire). Then you can always sand the excess without messing up everything too much :)
There's a potter who does something similar as what you want, but with leaves. Her brand name is Kanimbla Clay, maybe you can try to contact her, see how she does it?

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Great ideas mentioned above.But whenever i  choose to apply Mishima during the leather hard state(greenware).

 

Also once you have painted the piece with one coat of the underglazeor slip,let it air dry back to a dry leather hard state before moving on to the other step of wiping your surface.If you wipe your pot too soon after applying the underglaze there will be lot of streaking of underglaze .Also double check that your H2O is clean,if not change the water and try wiping,again.

 

If there is still streaking once you have wiped your piece and you are concerned,let the piece be bone dry.Then sand the surface gently with a green kitchen scrub such as "Scotch Brite pad".(Be safe and wear a dust mask).

 

 

Vinks!

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  • 2 weeks later...

The way I stain is to incise designs, or in the case of leaves

on slabs, press in with a roller. Bisque, then stain.

 

I work mostly with red stoneware, but it works for me.

 

Good luck trying the many different methods...but try to remember

to post your final results and why that way was chosen.

 

Alabama

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  • 4 years later...
On 8/28/2015 at 2:30 PM, Judy_in_GA said:

I have seen multiple posts from others on this forum regarding a more precise way to apply.  You wax your design area first, carve through the wax then apply the stain.  It only sinks into the carving and beads up on the waxed area where you can easily wipe it away.

What if you want to glaze over the whole piece afterwards??  What would you do?  Thank you for your help.    

Manitoba

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18 minutes ago, Kikiberyl said:

What if you want to glaze over the whole piece afterwards??  What would you do?  Thank you for your help.    

Manitoba

Wax resist is applied to leatherhard pots then when the wax is dry you carve through it and brush underglaze onto the pot. Underglaze stays in the carved areas and gets wiped of the wax resisted areas then the pot is left to dry then bisque fired. Wax burns off in the bisque so glazing goes ahead as usual. (single firing aka raw glazing pots would't work with this method) Brand of wax resist makes a difference, some wax resists work better than others. 

Welcome to the forum :)

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