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Bioman

Can This Piece Be Salvaged?

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That's an interesting thread! I hope Bioman (welcome to the forum!!) will show pictures of the bisqued piece. I always use first vinegar to soak the crack and then paperclay to fill it up. Then the sanding part. If this doesn't work and the crack is still there after bisque, I never try to mend it again. If I want to keep the piece, I work with the crack. Paint it golden or blend it into the design. Since both cracks are on opposite sides of your piece, Bioman, you could emphasize them with unerglaze colors for instance.

 

I like Bioman's Bamboo design very much! Is it porcelain clay you used or stoneware?

 

Evelyne

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To fire - I've used the Mayco clay mender on a glazed piece (already fired) and on a piece that was glazed and waiting to be fired. They were both of the kind pictured in my previous post - it was a v small, delicate join in both that needed to be self supporting. They survived and the glaze actually camouflaged the mend! Worth a try!

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Hey will this work on a piece that has been glazed already. I know you would not be able to get it to match and disappear but can it save a piece?

I'd us e it with the paper clay to lessen shrinkage, give it a go. Apply it smooth it put glaze on it and try! worse case scenario??

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Still not sure of the product here. The only 'syrup' as such that I'm aware of is Lyles Golden syrup - clear, golden, runs off a spoon. I guess I could google Caro and see if something similar comes up. Will try that.

Celia;

you are over thinking this. It is just some cheap syrup to make the spooze sticky. you could even make it with sugar water.

TJR.

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Thanks TJR - sugar water I get.

Nonetheless even the words 'some cheap syrup' doesn't conjour up a range of products I might see in the supermarkets here - it's not something I've ever had on my shopping list. However, I don't bake cakes and biscuits, don't buy/eat waffles and my pancakes once a year on Shrove Tuesday, are adorned with lemon juice and sugar, so perhaps it's not surprising I don't buy it. I understand that Maple Syrup has found its way across the water and has become a popular accompaniment to pancakes - I did come across this in my local supermarket, when looking.

 

All this from someone who admittedly has a sweet tooth can you believe!?

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Thanks TJR - sugar water I get.

Nonetheless even the words 'some cheap syrup' doesn't conjour up a range of products I might see in the supermarkets here - it's not something I've ever had on my shopping list. However, I don't bake cakes and biscuits, don't buy/eat waffles and my pancakes once a year on Shrove Tuesday, are adorned with lemon juice and sugar, so perhaps it's not surprising I don't buy it. I understand that Maple Syrup has found its way across the water and has become a popular accompaniment to pancakes - I did come across this in my local supermarket, when looking.

 

All this from someone who admittedly has a sweet tooth can you believe!?

Celia;

It's the combination of vinegar and your clay body, with the syrup as stickiness to hold it all together until the crack sets. you could use any syruppy, sticky thing-even molasses.

T.

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Thanks Benzine. I'll try it next time the need arises. I've just been intrigued by the cultural differences his has given rise to!

 

TJR - you're trying so hard here .... Molasses?? Now I've heard the word but wouldn't have a clue as to its form, use, or supermarket aisle. I think I'm living in a parallel universe here.

 

Joel / Ann (Chilly) - is it me?????

 

Celia

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Thanks Benzine. I'll try it next time the need arises. I've just been intrigued by the cultural differences his has given rise to!

TJR - you're trying so hard here .... Molasses?? Now I've heard the word but wouldn't have a clue as to its form, use, or supermarket aisle. I think I'm living in a parallel universe here.

Joel / Ann (Chilly) - is it me?????

Celia

Treacle is molasses, some darker than others and I think some are more sulphury.

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Common language, in name, not necessarily in practice.  There's just a whole lot of time and history between our versions of English.  

 

Karo syrup is so common in the US, because corn is so common in the US.  High Fructose Corn Syrup has essentially replaced cane sugar in nearly everything.  So much so, that companies have started using cane sugar again, as a marketing ploy.  Though, I will say, the Pepsi they made with cane sugar for a while, was far superior to the modern recipe.

 

Molasses is a bi-product of processing white sugar.  When the extract the sugars from sugar cane, it is essentially brown sugar.  They spin it to extract the molasses, making it white sugar.  In fact, if you need brown sugar in a recipe, but only have white, you can add molasses to it and have the same thing.

From what I understand, Golden Syrup is a slightly more refined treacle.

 

I highly recommend the recipe for repairs.  Just make sure you add peroxide to keep the "funk" down.  It will probably still grow some mold, but it won't smell.

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Yay! Now I have the full picture Benzine, thanks. I'm in a sugar beet area here, but know surprisingly little about the process.

 

Thanks for the peroxide tip - nothing worse than smelly mould growth!

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Three nations. We don't have Karo syrup in Canada either.

T.

True, but we still speak a different language. A few years back while visiting cousins in Winnipeg and Spruce Grove we compiled an English/Canadian dictionary of all the different words and spellings we could think of. AndI have cousins less than 400 miles north from me and they speak a different version of English too.

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Golden syrup works Celia. Just send me a few cans for the tip!!

I even looked into the postage rates Babs - but really not cost effective. You need someone coming over in holiday to pack a can or two!

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Three nations. We don't have Karo syrup in Canada either.

T.

True, but we still speak a different language. A few years back while visiting cousins in Winnipeg and Spruce Grove we compiled an English/Canadian dictionary of all the different words and spellings we could think of. AndI have cousins less than 400 miles north from me and they speak a different version of English too.

 

I won't even get into French in Canada! :wacko:

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Spooze;

1/3 your clay body

1/3 vinegar

1/3 Caro syrup or other cheap sugar syrup.

Mix it up. Put it on to repair. Let dry and sand to taste.

TJR.

 

Hi TJR, is that by weight or by volume?

 

Sorry;

didn't see this question. It's by volume to get a thick paste like cement. Once you make the repair, I toss the spooze as the sugar will make it stink.

Tom.

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