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Can This Piece Be Salvaged?

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Give TJR's method a try. Might want to spritz water on the area around the cracks before you put the Spooze on. Works better is there is a more gradual transition between the dry body and the repair mix.... let it dry slow.

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I actually dab or spritz vinegar on, before using that recipe.  I try to avoid using any water when mending bone dry pieces, unless I'm rehydrating it.  That may be unnecessary, but it's worked for me so far.

 

I will say, that recipe works wonders.  I've used it to reattach small pieces, that I just loaded into the kiln.  I do mix a little tissue/ toilet paper with the vinegar, before adding the other ingredients though.

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If there is still a crack after the bisque, soak the crack and apply more snooze and RE-BISQUE.

The surface of the crack after bisque firing, will need to be very damp to wet so the snooze can seep in. If it gets sucked in too quickly onto a dry surface, it won't stick.

 

Marcia

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Spooze;

1/3 your clay body

1/3 vinegar

1/3 Caro syrup or other cheap sugar syrup.

Mix it up. Put it on to repair. Let dry and sand to taste.

TJR.

 

Hi TJR, is that by weight or by volume?

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OK, so what I am hearing is no need to Bisque first.  I will give it a try.  Thanks guys.

Don't bisque. Spooze is a repair recipe for raw clay cracks.

You goop it on, let dry, then sand, then bisque.

T.

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It works on bisqued ware too TJR, But prob preferrably on unfired.  I've successfully repaired, stuck on  poorly applied spriggs on student pots  I've also repaired cracks on bisque ware with the above Spooze recipe with paper added.

Volume not weight is how I mix mine.

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Also add a few teaspoons to a tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide, to prevent bacterial growth. I've had my mixture last a summer, with only a bit of mold growth on it. No smell, just the mold.

 

I used to buy a mender liquid, that you added to slip. It worked OK, but this stuff is waaaay better and cheaper.

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In the beginning I bought everything i could find that would fix greenware and bisque cracks.     Mixed up that magic clay.   Tried that Spooze recipe.     Bought a couple things online.   Can't recall the exact success rate ... but it wasn't that high.  And one of my repaired pieces cracked later on .. the customer brought it back.    Yes I know others have more success and I applaud them.

 

What I learned is that with all the time spent trying to repair, I could have made another one.  Just saying ...

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Yip, If repaired, prob. not for functional market. Sculputural fine. But can still be enjoyed at home. Doesn't ring on the ping test....

But as precious stuff , ok. Many a smiling student....

Just saying Mark On certain days certain adages should not be mentioned!

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For those of us this side of the pond can someone explain what Caro syrup or sugar syrup is?

 

I've used vinegar slip on greenware with mixed success, perhaps syrup will make all the difference?

 

On the other hand I've had good results with Mayco's clay mender on bisque and even glazed pieces, where very small (3mm broken surface) pieces have been knocked off. See pic. (these bowls are generally 5-6" diameter). Takes a lot of patience and a delicate touch, but so does the initial making, so I've deemed it worth the investment - time & emotional!

 

I have learnt to only work on these pieces when I can give them my full concentration - the slightest carelessness will see a piece of the 'stencil' on the work table. I have to tell myself when to stop clean up at the greenware stage - and leave it until it's bisqued. Also, I now sandwich the v thin slab for cutting the stencil, between cling film throughout the whole procedure, including drying.post-13648-0-47288700-1438420448_thumb.jpg

post-13648-0-47288700-1438420448_thumb.jpg

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OK, so what I am hearing is no need to Bisque first.  I will give it a try.  Thanks guys.

Don't bisque. Spooze is a repair recipe for raw clay cracks.

You goop it on, let dry, then sand, then bisque.

T.

 

I have used it on bisque and it works. Best to do it first on raw clay. One of my pieces , a column I made while a resident at the Clay Studio in Phila., blew out the bottom. I didn't fire it on coils.and it barely fit in the kiln. I repaired it with spooze and refried it. Great rescue using snooze.The one on the right was repaired.42" ht. The capital is separate.

post-1954-0-59256300-1438431095_thumb.jpg

post-1954-0-59256300-1438431095_thumb.jpg

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Spooze;

1/3 your clay body

1/3 vinegar

1/3 Caro syrup or other cheap sugar syrup.

Mix it up. Put it on to repair. Let dry and sand to taste.

TJR.

 

Hi TJR, is that by weight or by volume?

 

I just go a table spoon of your vinegar and a spoon full of syrup added to a goop of your wet clay scraps.

i go by eye. Just mix it up so it looks like a paste. If too thick, add more vinegar. You will only need like a quarter cup of mix.

T.

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For those of us this side of the pond can someone explain what Caro syrup or sugar syrup is?

 

I've used vinegar slip on greenware with mixed success, perhaps syrup will make all the difference?

 

On the other hand I've had good results with Mayco's clay mender on bisque and even glazed pieces, where very small (3mm broken surface) pieces have been knocked off. See pic. (these bowls are generally 5-6" diameter). Takes a lot of patience and a delicate touch, but so does the initial making, so I've deemed it worth the investment - time & emotional!

 

I have learnt to only work on these pieces when I can give them my full concentration - the slightest carelessness will see a piece of the 'stencil' on the work table. I have to tell myself when to stop clean up at the greenware stage - and leave it until it's bisqued. Also, I now sandwich the v thin slab for cutting the stencil, between cling film throughout the whole procedure, including drying.attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Hey;

We can't buy Caro syrup here in Canada either. It's any cheap syrup. Aunt Jemima works. It's the stickyness you want.

Don't be using your good Canadain Maple Syrup for this job. Make some pancakes for that.

T.

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Still not sure of the product here. The only 'syrup' as such that I'm aware of is Lyles Golden syrup - clear, golden, runs off a spoon. I guess I could google Caro and see if something similar comes up. Will try that.

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