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Glazes With Alberta Slip

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This week I am reading about glazes with Alberta Slip. I have been looking for a clear for my brown clay and if I can get it to look like the pictures, it should work great. I am getting my info from AlbertaSlip.com. Another glaze I really want to work is Alberta Slip, lithium, and tin. The website states that to get the pictured results that part of the Alberta Slip must be ballmilled. Does not give a percentage. While reading John Britt's book, Complete Guide To Mid-Range Glazes, he mentions that this use to be the case, but is no longer necessary due to the fine quality of raw materials now available. If anyone is interested in trying any of these glazes, John does still recommend to calcine half of the Alberta Slip.

 

I would like to know of anyone's experience with these types of glazes.

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I use a lot of alberta slip in one glaze (over 70% if I recall)I do not ball mill it. I'm also working in a higher temp range than cone 6. The clay (alberta is very fine) has been ground well the past 20 years.

Mark

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Digital Fire states that it is to plastic in the raw state. That by calcining a portion of it will reduce shrinkage while drying as a glaze.

 

I will post test tiles when complete. I noticed I have no red clay test tiles so add another few days to the long drawn out operation. I am so impatient.

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So was sweating in the studio. Mixed up 5 glaze test, then the power went out. I would consider mustering on with my headlamp on but my son took it to camp. (Weary sigh). So sitting in the dark with my phone and a beer, watching the lightning and listening to the thunder.

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Posting an Update.

 

Got up at 2 am and started kiln this morning.  Will unload tomorrow morning and hopefully post some pictures soon after.  Ended up making over 120 test tiles.  Using 8 different glazes, made tiles with each glaze over than under the other seven glazes on both a white stoneware and red stoneware.  Didn't have enough dishes to put under all the tiles that I was unsure of in regards to running.  It was time to put kiln wash on the shelves again so I added a couple of extra coats in case of drips.  Part of the delay has been the crazy weather.  We have been having a chance of thunderstorms (and usually getting one) for nearly every day for two weeks.  I wont start the kiln if there is a chance of a thunderstorm.  About 50% of the time I loose power when there is thunder and lighting.  After 5 years of lower than average rainfall we are making up for it this year.  I plan to have some pictures done on Wednesday and will probably post some that night. 

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I couldn't be happier with the results of the glaze testing I did last week.  I have been looking for glazes that work well over standard's Red rock.  It's a red cone 6 clay that is a joy to throw with.  I will attach pictures of test tiles which should show the name of the glaze on the picture.  If anyone is interested in these glazes they are available on the Plainsman clay website.  The Alberta Slip Rutile is suppose to be a substitute glaze for a traditional Rutile blue.  These were all fired in a regular firing sequence without any hold or long cool down.  The Alberta Slip Rutile should give an even more Hares Fur Blue in a slow cooling cycle.

 

 

 

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I couldn't be happier with the results of the glaze testing I did last week.  I have been looking for glazes that work well over standard's Red rock.  It's a red cone 6 clay that is a joy to throw with.  I will attach pictures of test tiles which should show the name of the glaze on the picture.  If anyone is interested in these glazes they are available on the Plainsman clay website.  The Alberta Slip Rutile is suppose to be a substitute glaze for a traditional Rutile blue.  These were all fired in a regular firing sequence without any hold or long cool down.  The Alberta Slip Rutile should give an even more Hares Fur Blue in a slow cooling cycle.

 

 

 

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post-13967-0-96602000-1436582787_thumb.jpg

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