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Judith B

Dip-Glazing: Any Magical Trick?

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So very often, I make a piece I am very happy with, but when the glazing comes, I always (well, very often), screw everything up. I am probably the worst ever when it comes to glazing. So I don't know if you have any secret technique to share?
For example, I usually glaze by dipping. As long as it's the same colour all over the piece, I just grab the tongs and tadaaam. But I like to layer glazes to get nice colours. So for example, I would dip the whole piece is colour 1 and then, add colour 2 only inside. But then when I pour the glaze out, every single time I end up with splashes of glaze 2 on the outside... Which I can't wipe off since it would take off glaze 1 too.

 

So I don't know but it seem each time I pour the glaze out (of a bowl, a mug, just about anything), no matter if I go slowly, or fast, if I spin the bowl or no, I always have glaze dripping on the outside. Am I just being two complicated trying to layer the glazes? Or is it doable?

 

Thanks!

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Glaze the inside first. Then set the cup, bowl, mug what ever down. Let it dry. Take metal rib, hold over garbage can, scrape off the glaze off the rim, where it ran out. Take wet sponge and wipe off remaining glaze remnants. Should come off super easy. Wipe around the rim and get the glaze line you want.

 

Proceed to dip rest of piece. The inside will get overlapped slightly, but it will always be a lot more even than pouring out, and usually creates a nice effect.

 

If your glazing the outside first your gonna have a lot harder time with the lines from the inner glaze. It is near impossible to pour without having a slight overlap. So what happens is you have an overlap of a glaze you already have made, and you can't fix it without scraping off your outside glaze. Where when you do inside first you can fix that outside overlap from the pour.

 

I hope this helps. It took me a while to understand this as well. Now I always batch glaze the inside of all my pots with my liner glaze, then I go back and scrape off all the rims and sponge them. Then I dip the outside, and when I do this I let it drip upside down and slowly roll the pot around upside down, spreading those drips around the rim. 

 

Looking at your pictures though your glazes look fantastic. I don't see the real issue.  :)

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Just recently ther ewas another post on this. The advice given added to the above in that it was suggested to coat the inside glaze with wax for a distance down the inside so that when you dipped to glaze the ouit side, there was a neat defining line between the glazes.

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I use wax resist as Babs mentioned if I want to get a really clean line ... also, I second grype's advice, all of it is excellent.

 

I used to freak out if I splashed the second glaze where it wasn't supposed to be, wipe it off right aw!! Then I'd have to touch up the first one and end up with thin or thick spots. Well recently I've found that if you just leave it alone, let it fully dry, you can carefully scrape off the second glaze with no damage to the first one IF the first one was nice and dry.

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No one knows how much I used to freak out over glaze issues such as

splatters, smudges, and finger imprints than me. With time, you'll

learn to let it go, relax over the imperfections that only you notice.

 

Once I made a some mugs, about 4, used the same clay, same, glaze, and

fired them in the same load. Then the mugs were sold to members of the

same group. The new owners had to tie different colored ribbons

on the handles to tell whose were who.

 

I think most buyers are interested in form, weight, balance, food safe,

microwavable, and dishwasher safe.

Imperfections such as splashes, etc. come in last.

But if the imperfection still haunts you then take a stiff bristled

brush and flick glaze over the neck and shoulder of the vessel or

make flower petals out of the splashes, or look into sponge glazed

pottery. (That should hide just about anything).

 

In most cases, I am the perfectionist, but no longer in the way of glazing.

When I did freak out about a glaze issue, and "fixed it", it was always

100% worse than it began.

 

Just remember, a small drip or splash of glaze will make the finish

good, bad, or indifferent. You'll get to this point sooner or later, might

as well start now! :) 143

 

PS - yes, I did everything you've done and more! The scraping tools,

razor blades, finger tip touch ups, rinsing off glazes and starting over,etc.,etc.

If you haven't figured it out, most of all the answers/opinions on

this forum is from past experience.

 

 

Just my humble opinion.

Alabama

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I try to do the glaze drips on purpose. It makes the pot more interesting to look at.  I was pouring some glaze over a mug today and held my fingers in the center of the front of the mug in a way to make the prints more obvious. (sort of like using resist in spots before pouring.)  I will post results after the glaze fire.  

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I dip my pots and leave the finger marks from the pots. The glaze melts over them a little and it adds some interesting texture. I dunno, I like it right now. I also leave the pour runs on the outside as well if the piece is rather non uniform. If I throw an nice uniform shape then I clean to fit the piece. 

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I use wax resist as Babs mentioned if I want to get a really clean line ... also, I second grype's advice, all of it is excellent.

 

I used to freak out if I splashed the second glaze where it wasn't supposed to be, wipe it off right aw!! Then I'd have to touch up the first one and end up with thin or thick spots. Well recently I've found that if you just leave it alone, let it fully dry, you can carefully scrape off the second glaze with no damage to the first one IF the first one was nice and dry.

Oh yeah I never tried using wax over a glaze, I will do that next time. But yes I feel that trying to fix it usually makes it so much worse. I think alabama you might be right, just let it go.

Thanks for your help!

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There are many tricks to glazing-besides tongs-you can also use a funnel pitcher to pour insides or for pouring exact areas.

This is an area that the more you do it the better you get.Pouring glaze out of interiors is a developed skill.

Mark

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One thing I have started doing is quickly filling my entire mug with glaze all the way to the rim then flipping it upside down in the bucket as fast as I can. This leads to a really nice even coat. I was rolling the glaze around the inside of the cup, but I found the coat wasn't even enough unless i took my time, and then I had to much glaze on the bottom. If you can fill the cup up then hold it for like 2 seconds and flip you get a nice even glaze. I do the same for small bowls too.

 

Simon Leach has a way he cocks his hand and rolls it out as he pours it. It is quiet clever. I need to practice it in the bathtub or something.

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Simon Leach has a way he cocks his hand and rolls it out as he pours it. It is quiet clever. I need to practice it in the bathtub or something.

 

I can't get the hang of the rolling way, given up and use the full-mug method now.

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Try spinning round three times, wiggling you nose and shouting profanities. That works for me :D

Haha good idea, I'm pretty sure no one will wonder what is wrong with me at the community centre! :D

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to learn the pouring out technique you admire, try it with a real mug and water.  try looking at the mug as a clock face and twirl it with your thumb at 10 and end at the opposite side.  i suggest doing this over a large sink and when you are alone so you do not have a laughing audience.  or maybe that would be more fun for all.

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Pouring glaze take practice-like throwing pots.

Fill a few dozen mugs in house with water-experiment with full to not so full-pour them out-try to do this drip free. 

practice makes perfect.

I can pour out any veessel without drips but because I have so many we use a glaze jet which is faster but its for high production use.

I still pour a few odd shapes every fe weeks during glazing. Mugs we squirt with the jet.

Mark

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mark, is that jet the one you send upward into the upside down mug?  is it foot operated?

Its the one's I made and spoke about on this thread

http://community.ceramicartsdaily.org/topic/1752-production-glaze-ideas/

 

They drop into a 5 gallon bucket .

And the pump is hand operated-I wrote aacticle with instructions and photos in the studio potter-that is referred in the above link.

They are made from PVC and stainless and rubber.They cost a bit to make but if you glaze lost of interiors they are worth it.

mark

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