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AmeriSwede

Oven Stones For Baking Bread

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As making/baking bread has for decades been a favored activity of mine, and I now have my kiln installed and wired, I'm curious about the making of some oven baking stones.

 

In my previous life, about 15 years ago in the USA, I had a commercial set of these stones. If I recall correctly, there were four, each about 3/4" thick measuring about 8" x 8". Again, if my memory serves me, their composition looked similar to that of standard kiln shelves.

 

The question is.... Would a well grogged clay, mature fired to ^6, suffice for this purpose, or would a higher mature-fired clay (grogged/^10) be better? unsure.gif

 

Anybody have any experience or knowledge of making oven baking stones?

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"their composition looked similar to that of standard kiln shelves"

I actually use a standard cordierite kiln shelf for baking bread and pizza. I bought a small 15" round one just for this purpose. And it works great!

I guess this would spoil the fun of making your own stones. I've never done it myself, but I think your idea of using groggy cone 6 clay would work just fine.

My sister likes to bake bread inside one of my covered casseroles, and that also works great. The bread is nice a crusty on the bottom where it touches the pot, and the steam trapped inside the covered pot keeps the interior of the bread really fluffy and soft. Delicious!

Mea

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Thanks Herb for the older link. I had mindlessly not even thought of checking older posts as my memory led me to believe the subject hadn't been covered... One of these days, I'll have to personally admit that the gray matter seems to be getting darker... biggrin.gif

 

Thanks Seasoned Warrior and Phill for your input on that previous posting, http://ceramicartsda...9-pizza-stones/

 

Great points listed on that... so methinks I'll be making some pizza stones 1" thick (after shrinkage) with heavily grogged stoneware clay (probably ^6 to maintain some porosity) and leave the surface textured rather than burnishing (for crispiness). I'll post results after a few loaves of bread and pizza are consumed!

 

Thanks Mea, for the mention of the cordierite kiln shelf, I was curious about using those, but not wanting (at this time) to spend a load of money for a new shelf that would fit the oven wasn't in my plan. The covered casserole is an interesting idea. Is that a glazed casserole dish or unglazed?

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It is a glazed casserole. I read in the other thread (that Herb pointed out) that a glazed pizza stone would make a soggy crust, so I'm not sure why that's not the case for my sister. Maybe because bread bakes for a longer time than pizza, therefore it still has time to develop a nice crust?

 

Mea

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Guest HerbNorris

I remembered that the subject of baking stones had come up before, and that it was specifically about pizza stones. A search for baking stones would likely have turned up nothing; glad you were able to get some info from it.

I shall have to try that kiln shelf idea for a baking stone, a 15" round shelf would be perfect.

I wonder if I should coat it with kiln wash to protect it against cheese run? ( Kidding)

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I make unglazed buff or red stoneware bread bakers in a lot of shapes, and pizza stones that are perforated with drilled holes like a colander. The clay is one I mix myself and contains about 12 % grog. I bake every day and it is pretty important to season your pan ( slather in olive oil and canola oil mixture and heat to 350,then let it sit in oven for at least an hour, wipe gently when done). About 3/8 in thickness is the ideal.

 

I also recommend not ever cleaning them if you can avoid it because the water is not great for them and can cause steam.

If for some reason there is any weakness or lack of integrity in the clay the steam can cause cracks or explosions. I learned this the hard way many years ago as a beginning potter when I tried to make solid pizza stones , the drilled holes are much safer and make great crispy crust.

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Let's not forget that baking bread has been a daily event since Adam asked Eve to make him a sandwich. it's not rocket science, and just about any solution will work.

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Guest HerbNorris

"...since Adam asked Eve to make him a sandwich."

 

How do you know Eve didn't ask Adam to make her a sandwich?

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