Jump to content

Table-Top Lighting And Cube


Recommended Posts

I just got a flyer for a table-top photography kit that includes a photo cube for diffusing lighting and 2 color corrected lights with stands and reflectors. The kit folds down into a carrying case. It has been my experience that this company sells affordable equipment that with some care can provide an entry-level platform for porfesional photography at a most reasonable cost. The kit is currently on sale for $105. While the equipment is not as robust as most professional photographic equipment is is perectly adequate and quite inexpensive.

 

http://www.cowboystudio.com/product/c10/p10-20.php

 

Regards,

Charles

Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing missing is the graduated black to white background that makes most pots look good.

Personally I would not use colored ones since I believe it is easier to achieve a consistent look with a less distracting background.

Also, I use three lights ... One on each side and one on top ... This eliminates weird shadows.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a similar set up. I got an e-z light cube several years ago. I had clip on lights already and blue lightbulbs. I use a black to white varitone

backdrop. The ez cube is about 30" in all directions and I had to trim my smaller baritone backdrop to fit it into the cube.I use several lights like Chris.

The setup describe by Seasonal Warrior , aka Charles, looks reasonable and a good setup and inexpensive.

 

Marcia

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also invested in a EZ cube many years ago and use a white backdrop. At a later stage I added three lights, one for each side and one for the top. My work is highly reflective as I use a lot of lustre and gold. Normally photographing these would be a pain but this set up allows me to take all my own images in a stress free environment. I would highly recommend any brand of collapsible light tent together with lights for any ceramist who is serious in their presentation. The price for the outfit that Charles is querying is very competitive.

 

Johanna

Link to post
Share on other sites

Johanna ... I notice you get good top lighting ... Do you use a stronger bulb on the center light?

 

 

 

Hi Chris

In answer to your question, I use the same strength bulb for all three lights. I am currently using 30 Watt 5000K compact fluorescents. (30 watt CF=150W ordinary bulb=1800 lumens) (This is all written on the packaging.)

 

However my light tent is in front of a window so this may throw extra light through the top but not through the back as that has the cartridge paper backdrop suspended from it. I tend to take all my photos during the day as well with all other lights in the room being turned off.

 

I have attached a .jpeg of my setup as my description is a bit vague.

 

Johanna

 

 

post-2645-13082079661474_thumb.jpg

post-2645-13082079661474_thumb.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually prefer a shooting table such as these from B&H in New York ( http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=shooting+tables&N=0&InitialSearch=yes ) and then going with a softbox on the lighting unless I'm using strobes which I actually prefer for their saturation. The reason that I like a shooting table is that there are rails for additional lights and you can use a variety of seamless backgrounds also it gives you better access to the object than a cube does.

 

regards,

Charles

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks,

 

This forum is for talking about business, but please refrain from posting ads for items that are for sale. For example, it is OK to mention or recommend PotterBarter as a resource for potters, but please do not repost a specific ad from PotterBarter into this forum.

 

(somebody did that this morning, I deleted the post.)

 

Thank you,

 

Mea

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are also many ways to make your own. Google make your own light box, or light cube and lots of different designs come up. There are some made with wood, some with pvc pipe, and with vinyl shower curtains or tissue paper as diffusers. Or if you're even more poor, I mean thrifty, like I am, you can make one with stuff you probably already have lying around. Here is an example of a design for a cardboard box light cube.

 

I've been looking at the results of some of the cardboard ones online and the results are surprisingly professional and non-thrifty looking. I haven't yet, but I plan to make myself the cardboard one and try it out.

 

Here is a site I found that explains a lot about photographing objects like pottery and has lots of good tips. in house photo studio

 

Doe anyone know where to get the graduated backgrounds?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I say this with a friendly smile ...of course it only costs $2 to punch holes in a cardboard box and fill in the gaps ...

You need lighting to make the deal work and that's where you might need to spend more.

 

I'm betting you could save time, money and aggravation by looking for a used set up or getting together with a couple other artists ... pool your resources and get a good set up to share. Images are key to success ... it's the standard by which your work will be judged.

You can make a bad pot look great with the proper set up but a fabulous pot will never look good when it's badly photographed.

 

You can Google graduated backgrounds and find many sources. They cost but last forever if you are careful.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I say this with a friendly smile ...of course it only costs $2 to punch holes in a cardboard box and fill in the gaps ...

You need lighting to make the deal work and that's where you might need to spend more.

 

I'm betting you could save time, money and aggravation by looking for a used set up or getting together with a couple other artists ... pool your resources and get a good set up to share. Images are key to success ... it's the standard by which your work will be judged.

You can make a bad pot look great with the proper set up but a fabulous pot will never look good when it's badly photographed.

 

You can Google graduated backgrounds and find many sources. They cost but last forever if you are careful.

 

 

Back in the day as a poor but ambitious college student I found that an old bedsheet makes a great diffuser as well as a pretty good light box even when supported on re-bent metal coathangers :)

 

Best regards,

Charles

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi folks,

 

This forum is for talking about business, but please refrain from posting ads for items that are for sale. For example, it is OK to mention or recommend PotterBarter as a resource for potters, but please do not repost a specific ad from PotterBarter into this forum.

 

(somebody did that this morning, I deleted the post.)

 

Thank you,

 

Mea

 

 

I was wondering.....is there a place in the forum (or if not, could it be added) for potters to post equipment they have for sale?

Thanks,

Brenda

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I was wondering.....is there a place in the forum (or if not, could it be added) for potters to post equipment they have for sale?

Thanks,

Brenda

 

 

 

 

Brenda, you can advertise items for sale in the Classified section of both CM and PMI, either in print or online or both. Potters Council members can get one free online classified ad. Here's a link:

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/daily/submit-classified-advertising/

 

You can also try the aforementioned PotterBarter, which can be found on Yahoo Groups. And you can also list items for sale on Clayart.

 

Mea

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.