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Found 5 results

  1. Hello and thanks in advance for the help and advice! I just got a Duncan Ea820-2 Kiln for my home studio. It already has a center peep hole in the lid. I am installing an ENVIRO-VENT 2 Kiln Vent (the kiln will be in my garage). Do I need to fill in the center peep hole and drill the 2 holes near the edge as directed in the instructions? Or will it function the same? If I do need to fill it, what is the best way to go about doing that? Also, it has some interior bricks that have some dings in them, what is the best product to fix those with? The elements all look good and I will "Kleenex" test them before I do my first (practice) firing. Anything else I should know before I start using it? I taught ceramics for years, but only used the industrial kilns at school so the home kiln ownership is new to me!
  2. When I am firing my electric kiln, I start with the lid propped open about 2 inches and the top peephole out. Then at around 1000 degrees F I shut the lid. The top peephole is open the whole time. I understand that the lid needs to be propped to allow moisture and gasses to escape in the early stages of firing. My questions are: 1) is 1000F an appropriate temp to close the lid? 2) Is it necessary to prop the lid on a ^6 glaze firing as well as the bisque, or only during the bisque (^06) I have been firing this way for a couple years and the pots always come out well. However the lid has badly cracked on both the inside and outside, necessitating repair with kiln cement. I have a large electric Skutt Kiln (I think it's the 1227). Even with my repair, it is all fractured and occasionally falls onto the pots below. The metal handle is also badly rusted and corroded, an issue I didn't notice when I bought this kiln used a couple years ago. I notice when I close the lid on an 1000F kiln it makes a soft settling crackling noise. I am curious if the cracking lid is from thermal shock when it goes from hot room temp to 1000F. Because of this, i wonder if it's better not to close it so late (and hot) in the firing. Perhaps it's just time for an envirovent. Is it normal for a lid to start to deteriorate like this? The newer versions of my kiln are made with the hydraulic lid lifter, which I assume lifts it more evenly, without the torque from supporting it on just one part. Please let me know if anyone else has had this cracking lid issue. -Dana
  3. I am interested in Your input... I want to tile my bathroom myself, using tiles I created with molds. So the tiles created MUST be WATER PROOF! Firing the green ware using a home kiln, using my 110v house hold run wiring. Finally after firing to bisque, glazing to fire. I live in a townhouse so extra venting or drilling is not possible. I know this venture is going to take forever unless Covid takes me. What kind of kiln? How and why. I use to help my mom when she use to do ceramics. Way back with cones and giant kilns. So not what I want nor need
  4. Hi All, I work in the same room as our kiln and my husband and I are hoping to be pregnant soon so I'm looking into every possible way to reduce hazards in the studio. Controlling what materials I use is an easy fix but preventing toxic gases from leaking out of the kiln is my biggest concern (even if most firings take place overnight when I'm not around). Our kiln is already equipped with a downdraft vent but I wonder if it is as effective as an overhead hood vent? Is it overkill to do both at once? Would running both at the same time work against each other? Does it change the kiln atmosphere to run both at the same time? Anyone have experience running both at the same time? I've also read that in order to run the hood vent the kiln lid needs to be cracked? Doesn't that defeat the purpose a bit? Any advice on what is safest is greatly appreciated! Thank you! Angela
  5. Hi Guys, I have a small test kiln from paragon that has one peep hole and no vent. Everyone that I have contacted says that small test kilns don't need to be vented, just prop the lid open for the first few hours of firing and then close it. I have not had any success with this. I tried keeping it propped open until it reaches 1400 degrees, however it never reaches that temperature probably because the heat is escaping. It's mainly affecting my red glazes right now, however all of my glazes come out very dark and the red ones look burnt and brown ALL the time. After doing a lot of research, I can only guess that its because there isn't proper ventilation happening inside of the kiln. Is there a way that I can vent the kiln myself? I can't really afford an actual venting system right now, and I don't even know if those would work on my kiln because it's so small. Does anyone have any recommendations?
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