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Found 10 results

  1. Hi folks, once again it seems the pool of questions is dried up with nothing new offered. Again, I will try to offer a question of interest: How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas? I have several work set ups, that I use in the studio. My wedging table does multiple duty and has a few plastic trays that are attached to the front for tools, like the wire cutters and a putty knife for scraping. I also have a shelf underneath that the banding wheel and scale store on. I have a flip down cover that fits tightly over the original surface that is made of plywood to wedge the white clay on, the darker clays on the original concrete surface. I also have two containers stored underneath of magic water. . . one lighter, one darker. I also have a tray near the wall where the table is attached with a brush, and round dowel like rib, and tooth brushes for joining handles and pieces to pots. For throwing, I have a CXC with a stand up square wooden trimming guard that stands in front of the wheel on end. This allows me to set a kitchen wire basket with partitions to hold numerous ribs, stamps and other tools. I also keep a bucket on the wheel tray, and a few most often used tools. When I start trimming, I remove the top kitchen basket, and remove the CXC splash guard to slide the trimming tray in place. On the right of the trimming tray is a magnetic strip where I hand may trimming tools not in use. I also have cabinet next to the wheel with several drawers I can open and retrieve tools or stamping materials as needed. There are many of you out there producing many more pots than I, and have excellent organization skills to set up your work areas. . pass these ideas along! So I will ask once again. . . How do you prefer to organize your tools for your work areas? best, Pres
  2. Hello. I love carving on my pots, and am looking for quality carving tools that will give me the preciseness I'm looking for. I understand that diamondcore makes amazing tools, however I do not currently have the amount of money it takes to buy their product. Are there any quality alternatives out there? Thanks!
  3. It's time to replace my angle grinder and I'm torn between sticking with slide-style on/off switch that locks the grinder on, or switching to the paddle-style. I have always used grinders with the locking slide switches, but the increased safety of the paddle switch seems a good thing to invest in. However I'm concerned that keeping the paddle engaged could be tiresome and uncomfortable when grinding a stack of shelves (sometimes 30+ in a session). What grinder do you use? Anyone have a paddle-style and love it? Hate it? Anyone made the switch from slide to paddle? Drilling down one more level into specifics: I have several Milwaukee M18 Fuel tools and if I go cordless for the new grinder it would be with one of the M18 brushless grinders so that I can use the same battery platform I already have for drills, drivers, etc. If anyone has experience with these particular grinders I'd appreciate your review of the tool for grinding kiln shelves. How long will a 5.0 battery last when grinding glaze spots and kiln wash?
  4. Hi folks, There have not been any new questions in the question pool of late, and I believe I have gone through everyone of them. So tonight I will pose my own question. What studio tool under $100 was your best purchase? I have to look at a series of tools that cost less than $100 dollars to purchase, my triple beam balance, my really nice banding wheel, my regular scale for weighing clay, the hand blender, and my Griffin Grip. I use most of these quite a bit, and would be lost without most of them. I can not go without using the balance and scales. I can work around having the banding wheel as I have a potters wheel. The hand blender can be replaced with a whisk and a lot of work. I can trim everything with chucks, tap centering and clay chocks or damp wheel head, but I really have gotten attached to my GG. So for me it is the GG. I purchased this way back in the 70's maybe a year after they appeared. Over the years I have trimmed a lot of pots on it, used it to band decoration and recenter rims of cheese hard forms, used the 3 divider lines to facet rims, and cut foot rings, set up at rimming chuck to trim chalice on, and use it to final sign all of my pots. Yeah my GG was my best purchase. best, Pres
  5. Hello, I am new to ceramics. I have made coil and slab pieces during high school art class, but that's it. I think I know the basics of making pieces, but I'm not sure how the whole firing process goes. I have found a used Skutt kiln for sale. Model LT-3K, three tier, new shut off tube assembly, inside 1/2 selves, on roll cart, and vents to outside for $700. Does this sound like a deal to anyone? What should I look out for when purchasing a used kiln? Also, I need all the start up tools. I think I would like to purchase a wheel to make cups, bowls, plates, mugs, and vases. Any thoughts? Thanks!
  6. Standing in for Evelyne this week, So what is your favorite tool that came from some other place other than a pottery supply store. Something that you have recycled, or redesigned in some way to use in your pottery studio. Some of my favorites are bamboo kitchen utensils that I cut the handles off of to make all sorts of ribs. Another that I find quite useful is a potato peeler to facet the stems of chalices or to facet mugs before shaping. Give some examples of yours, pictures if you can. best, Pres
  7. Joe Campbell – The Potter’s Brush Workshop WS02 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, April 25 & 26, 2015 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member The tools we use in our studio can and should be an integral part of what we say with our work, and their voice should be heard. Good brushes, chosen for their particular ability, and used with skill, are critical to the success of our pieces. In this 2-day, hands on workshop, we will visit the history of the potter’s brush, explore techniques for the application of ceramic materials, and learn to build good ceramic brushes. Slides, videos, handouts, and instructor demonstrations will weave together the process for making brushes, and their skillful use with slips, engobes, underglazes, glazes, and wax resist. During the class students will make 3 brushes of their choosing, and have the time and opportunity to enhance their decorating skills using these new tools and new knowledge. All necessary materials for brush construction will be provided. Joe Campbell has been making pots for over 45 years, and making his own fine brushes for over 25. He is Professor Emeritus from Frederick Community College, having retired after 33 years of college level instruction in Ceramics and Art. Joe received his MFA in Ceramics from Ohio University in 1976, and his BS in Ceramics from Frostburg State College in 1973. His ceramic work has always been involved with the making of vessels, with a particular focus on the surface. “Yes from a functional standpoint, I want my pieces to work well, but shame on me if that is all they do. Great pots should strive to be every bit as engaging as a good painting or sculpture, and have as an added bonus, their physical function in our kitchens and our homes. This has always been my challenge in the studio. †His brushes are a natural outgrowth of this same challenge, seeking to be great decorating tools, and beautiful, intimate little pieces of sculpture in their own right. Joe has conducted numerous workshops in brush making and decorating throughout the nation, and done artist in residence stays from Watershed in Maine, to Tierra Hermosa Studios in New Mexico. WS02 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, April 25 & 26, 2015 Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members Contact Matthew Hyleck at matt.hyleck@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  8. franaldea

    workshop

    From the album: Our Workshop

    my handmade tools!
  9. I am inspired to post this as I have walked around a saber saw on a stand in my studio for low these past two years. I did not ask for this saw, nor do I know how to use it. It is good for hanging my parka on.The owner got it out of his house. He left with a good feeling, having rid himself of an uneeded piece of equipment. I have been gifted clay, glaze, a gas kiln, more glaze,un-named white powdery bags of something.These are gifts that keep on giving. What have you been given that you didn't want, didn't ask for, and don't need? Merry Christmas. TJR.
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