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Found 5 results

  1. Hey! our larger cone 10 kiln recently suffered some damage where two arch bricks shot through the top and now we are left with a gaping hole. Luckily the keystone was not damaged and every other brick seems to be in the correct spot and undamaged. Though some are sagging and some are pushed up, nothing else happened. I constructed a support for the inside of the kiln so nothing else would shift out of place, but my question is- what is the easiest way to fit those two bricks back into place. I did order a few new arch bricks in case something goes wrong, but it seems like I should just be able to add the new bricks in the existing hole via the top of the kiln, and then shift the sagging bricks back up and all will be good. Am I under thinking this rebuild? I cannot find any videos or tutorials about how to just add one or two bricks back into an arch. Everything is seems to show the initial build, or small repairs, nothing like what I am about to undertake.
  2. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A natural gas fired downdraft soda kiln constructed at a workshop I gave at the Harvard University Ceramics Program.

    © john baymore -all rights reserved

  3. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    A propane fired gas kiln with a hinged door constructed at the Silvermine Art School in CT.

    © John Baymore -all rights reserved

  4. From the album: Kilns designed/constructed by John Baymore

    And example of one page of gas kiln plans.

    © john baymore -all rights reserved

  5. From the album: Kilns

    After the first layer of bricks were installed and the tie rods adjusted for the bricks to be tight, the arch support is removed by taking away the 2 x 4 supports.1996
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