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Found 5 results

  1. Hello I used a series of 4 glazes layered on a recent set of plates. Every single one of them has crawled, especially on one particular colour which I’m guessing is the thicker application when layered? My question is, can I reglaze and refire them, perhaps to a lower temperature? They’ve been fired to cone 7 (electric), and it’s a Valentine’s Delta stoneware. I’ve refired plates before and they’ve broken right down the centre. I’ve seen people on here say they’ve had success with refiring and wondering if there’s a recommended technique. Attached a couple of photos of the crawling. Hoping someone with more experience than I can provide a helpful suggestion. Other than telling me not to layer the glazes! Funnily enough I’ve used this glazing technique plenty of times on bowls without any problem. Thanks in advance.
  2. Hello, I have a figurative sculpture piece in a cone 5 white stoneware that I made poor Iron Oxide choice on. I put a fairly light Iron Oxide wash on over the entire thing as bisqueware, then fired it to cone 5. I'm O.K. ( or fatalistic) with about 90% of the surface, but the region of the head, which is a distinct area, is bothering me. There are some medals on the figures chest and i ran some super fine sandpaper over one and some of the oxide came up, the sanded area looks white. However that surface is closer to a burnished surface then the face is (I think) - so maybe the face absorbed more Iron Oxide? So I was thinking if I could sand off the face and... I don't know, some white glaze, or even try to underglaze and re-fire? My problems are a) I don't know how deeply Iron Oxide permeates a bisqueware piece, and b) I don't know when to stop messing with something. It may be I should just leave well enough alone. Just tried to put an image up but I'm not sure how to have a URL for an image, my carbonmade account isn't helping. Anyway, any sage advice would be appreciated .
  3. Hi - I was doing a glaze fire to cone 5 last night, and due to a dumb mistake on my part, the kiln shut off an hour too early. My question is this: can I save these pots by refiring them to the correct temperature? Can I do this without reglazing them? Is it even worth it? Any advice would be appreciated! Thanks!
  4. I'm not sure why some cone 6 glazes change color rather drastically when refired to a lower temperature, but maybe someone can explain. Specifically, Coyote Ice Blue glaze fired to cone 6 turned out the usual beautiful multi-hued blue, brownish at the breaks. Then I decided to put some low fire clear glaze on the bottom and refired the piece at cone 06. The result was an awful, mottled green and brown camouflage-like color. Yeechhh!! So I refired back up to cone 6 again hoping to recover the blues. The piece now looks much better - the greens are gone - but the subtler blues are also gone and there is more and deeper brown. As it happens, I did the same thing to several other pieces with different commercial glazes on them. All of them suffered significant color degradation after the 06 low fire, and recovered only a portion of their original color in the second cone 6 fire. With one exception: a bowl with a combination of Amaco Textured Turquoise and Amaco Iron Lustre looked pretty bad after the low fire but almost completely recovered its original color after being refired to cone 6. I thought it was safe to refire pieces at a lower temperature, but I am obviously mistaken. Any insights on this phenomenon would be appreciated.
  5. I use Southern Ice porcelain, bisque fired then sanded then fired to cone 9 and sanded again, I don't use glazes. I have started making complex neriage coloured work, using the same clay body. I sometimes develop fine cracks that can successfully be patched and refired to cone 9 but the result is an all over tiny bloating of the surface. I have read a lot about bloating and the possibility it is due to over firing but don't really know what that means. I have twice fired thinner, slip cast work (from the same clay) without developing this problem. Could it mean I need to slow down the firing at one or more stages?
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