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Found 14 results

  1. Late this week, or early next week folks, but no new questions in the QotW pool, so I will pose another question. When I started glazing in college, I had usually about 8 different cone 9-10 glazes to choose from in a studio that had a gas burning kiln that I believe may have been around 30 cu ft. The glazing was done with dipping, pouring and brushing with some splattering, but not much else. I continued much with this form of glazing while teaching, but added some atomizers to the work especially when working with ^6 in the HS I taught at. I still used the other techiques at PSU when doing grad school work. Then when I started my own studio at home with the purchase of a kiln and a motorized kick wheel I did much more glazing with the atomizer over a base matt white glaze and finished with calligraphic brush work. These pieces were one offs, and worked well with a few base glazes, and underglazes used as inglaze. However I changed direction as the glaze I used for a base proved to be unstable in my firings, and I found the zinc often dulled much of the color. I moved to a glaze with tin as an opacifier, and played with tin/chromium flashing for a while. Somewhere along the way I lost the feel for the previous work, as the glossy glazes moved too much and the colors were not the same. Of late I have been moving towards more texture in the piece allowing the glaze to break the thin and thicken as it breaks over the clay textured surface. I still am not happy with the results, but everything is a work in progress. The atomizer has been replaced by a spray gun, the inglaze replaced by glaze colors over the base glaze that is buttery white with the addition of 1-3% rutile. All of my firing for the last 30 years have been electric oxidation at ^6. QothW: What is your favorite technique of glazing and decorating? Does texture of the piece play into your choice of glazing and decorating? What atmosphere and cone do you fire to? best, Pres
  2. Hi folks, time for another topic, and don't forget you may post new ideas for QotW in the pool here: Of late I have considered some changes in the decorative process, I have often been interested in surface decoration and texture. I have probably done the gambit of Impressing, incising, piercing, added on clay or sprigging. In my earlier years I did mostly glaze dipping over bare surfaces, then spraying glazes through lace, and silk flower/leaves, along with calligraphic brushwork to bring out or add details. The last 20 years have been more about texture in the piece; first was faceting, then incising the unshaped cylinder. Then I started stamping, and forcing more into the clay to the point I often had to repair the piece when leather hard. Glazing was completed by spraying from different angles to highlight the surfaces. Lately I have considered returning to the smooth surfaces for large areas, with other areas of texture applied before the shaping. I would then decorate the smooth areas as mentioned before with stencils and inglaze work. QotW: What is your predominant method of decorating the greenware, and how do you deal with this decoration in your glazing? best, Pres
  3. Hello everybody! I am quite new to ceramics and I was wondering if it is possible to leave pieces unglazed. It concerns a series of handbuilt tealight holders, so even though it is functional pottery, they will not be used for any food or beverages. The types of clay I have used are the numbers 354 (980-1200 °C), 366 (1000-1120 °C) and 376 (max 1240 °C) from Have a good clay (I think it used to be called Goerg&Schneider). I like the structure and colour of the clay (especially when the tealight itself is lit and illuminates the chamotte) and I wish to keep it after firing the pieces. Is glazing a must for every piece of pottery? And if it is possible to leave them unglazed, should they be fired twice (and to which temperature)? Also, will the pieces be more brittle and fragile when they are not covered by the glaze? Thank you very much in advance! Any help is very welcome!:) Have a good day!
  4. Hi, new to these forums but really wanted to get some advice. I own my own small ceramic studio, I've been doing my own work all through the pandemic as I've not been able to teach. To try and save time, money I decided to try the one firing technique. First few bits of work came out ok. But the past two lots (and it's been a lot of work, a full kiln ) have either exploded or the glaze has just now worked. I think I'm being counter productive with my work. I have lots of pieces I can't use and now have to make more to cover orders ! Just wanted some thoughts on this process ! Is it worth the time and effort or should I go back to my original bisque and then glaze firing. ? Maybe I'm rushing or doing something wrong ? It's always been a difficult subject to approach with other potter's in the past.....as it's not regarded as 'good practice' . Be nice to hear the for's and against please ? Thanks in advance . Jayne
  5. This is my first post here, but I really need some guidance. I'm making handbuilt plate set (6 dinner, 6 dessert, and 2 serving plates) for a wedding gift for friends of mine. (I haven't figured out how to throw plates yet so they are slab) Anyways, I plan on doing high firing with them and would like glaze all around (i've tried to make a couple feet for them and it just hasn't worked well :( ). Do I use stilts? Is there a simple way to make feet that don't look like a first grader made them or that give to much height? How do I accomplish this?! Any and all constructive help would be appreciated!
  6. Hi all- hope everyone is doing well wherever you are. I was interested in purchasing an overglaze luster (metallic/gold) to apply to my pottery, but realizing my studio doesn't have the capability to do a 'third firing' for my pieces (especially if it requires different heating instructions etc.). I believe the studio fires at cone 6. Is there an alternative to using overglaze luster that could get me a similar effect? Any tips would be appreciated! Thanks.
  7. Hi, I am new to ceramic glazing. Are there any methods that can duplicate fire-based glazing on ceramics? I work at home, so i do not have access to kiln. I have read there are oven-based glazes and non-fire based glaze. How effective are they in terms of the glaze (will it be similar to fire glazed plate)? Thank You.
  8. Hi there, Like many artists, I am currently transitioning from making pottery in a community studio to working at home which is a big adjustment with an even bigger learning curve! I'll be setting up my very first kiln in the coming weeks and now need to figure out (for the first time) what the best commercial glazes out there are for the clay I'm using. For now I am using Standard #112 clay, and I will also eventually be working with their #551 Porcelain (both cone 6). I will be firing in a Skutt Km818 electric kiln. I have two big questions. First, does anyone have any tips on good commercial glazes to use on the #112 for a good fit? I'm specifically looking for a simple & reliable black, white and/or grey (glossy or matte), as well as other simple colors like cream, peach, soft/pale greens, yellows and generally neutral, organic tones. I like the look of flat color, and not necessarily layering. I've noticed that Coyote's Enduro-colors are really lovely and just my taste but I have zero experience with this company. Does anyone use these glazes? Has anyone tried Standard Clay CO's line of glazes? I just discovered those exist. Lastly, since much of my work is done by hand-painting AMACO Velvet underglazes, I now need to find a good zinc-free clear to put on top of both these clay bodies. Ideally, I'd love to find a glossy clear that won't craze or make my underglazes designs smudge or bleed color. This is a very overwhelming undertaking as a first-timer, so I'd love some feedback and guidance! Thanks!
  9. I’m on a really long and frustrating journey trying to find a glaze/clay match to avoid crazing. But why, time and time again, on YouTube and Instagram am I finding potters with high follower numbers and ‘JUST SOLD OUT ETSY RESTOCK’ posts who are advertising pots, which have clearly got crazing issues?? Is there a ‘generally accepted’ level of crazing one should expect? Is it ‘normal’ to hear your pottery ping when getting it out of the kiln then later pouring hot liquid in? I’ve been driving myself nuts, but it appears to not be as serious as I initially thought... am I wasting my time??
  10. Hi all. Am having trouble with pinholes. I am using some commercial glazes and one glaze I mixed up from a recipe I found online. I clean my pieces very well before I glaze. I allow to dry before glazing, and leave them covered until glazing. I believe maybe it could be my one glaze recipe, or perhaps it could be the firing. I rent a space and the owner does the firings. He will not let anyone else fire and he blames all defects on you or your pots. Any help is so much appreciated. I am attaching a photo of a bad example of a glaze with a pinhole I got this firing. I saw where I could add flux, or remove zinc or rutile? Here is my recipe for floating blue cone 6 I used: Neph Sy - 45.2 Gerstley Borate - 24.5 Silica - 18.9 EPK Kaolin - 5.7 Whiting - 3.8 Talc - 1.9 Bentonite - 2 Rutile Flour - 4 RIO - 2 Cobalt Carb - 1
  11. I have been wandering from years ,talked with many pottery experts but haven't got anything closest to yohem tenmoku glaze recipe, So is there anyone who can help me out to figure it how these wonderful bowls are done .
  12. https://photos.app.goo.gl/sA4GWePsvoQtE7gx6 Above is a link to the photo of an Eagle I sculpted. I mistakenly used low fire glazes on the head and feet while using cone 6 glazes on the body. Can I paint low fire glazes on the body to correct the problem? What would happen if I painted a low fire clear glaze on the body and re fired low range? Is there anything I can do to salvage the project? https://photos.app.goo.gl/sA4GWePsvoQtE7gx6
  13. From the album: Glaze Combinations

    Mug for a local apple merchant. The body glaze is Coyote Red/Gold with a small accent of Gun Metal Green on the rim. Best results are achieved by leaving the upper 1/4-1/2" unglazed and then dipping into the green. The apple embellishment is hand-painted: Mayco Caramel (Cone 05) - Coyote Really Red and whatever green I'm in the mood for! Clay is Laguna BMix5

    © Whistle Tree Pottery - Ellijay, GA 2015

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