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Found 3 results

  1. Hello, I finally feel comfortable with the number of tests I have run to share this information and make a definitive conclusion and recommendation. I have run 34 firing tests with burping and contrasted the results with 28 firings without burping. THIS IS ONLY A PROCESS FOR GLAZING. DOING THIS FOR BISQUE MAY CAUSE CRACKS. I HAVE NOT TESTED ON ONCE-FIRED WORK. Firstly, what do I mean when saying "burping kilns." The term comes from Raku (where I got started with pottery). Burping Raku is when you let oxygen into the container/ditch that you have your raku pieces sitting, many other potters, and I have found it to allow the glazes to become more active and colorful. However, that is not what I am referring to here. I am going to share with you my process to have your ceramics be more resistant to crawling. Process: Firstly, I do a slow ramp of my glaze loads (100-150 degrees/hour) to 250 degrees to allow for moisture to leave the pots. However, this is not a slow enough ramp and high enough temperature to completely rid your pieces of water and holding at such a low temperature adds unnecessary time to firings. So, every 150-200 degrees until about 700 degrees, I pop open the lid of my kiln for ten-fifteen seconds to allow for moisture to be released. Now, you are surely asking, "Why?" and "Will this damage my elements?" Why? - When I have burped the kiln, I have found glazes less likely to crawl. I also have found it less likely for the melt on glazes to be uneven. Will this damage your elements? - From what I have found, I have seen no stress on the elements. I have measured the time of firings and the life of the elements over two different sets, testing between burping and no burping. The process is incredibly easy- Know your ramp speeds, and calculate when your kiln will progress every 150 or 200 degrees, and go to your kiln with a pair of gloves and open the lid quickly. Do as many times as you would like until you hit 650/700 degrees. Anything over 700 will not work. (Little side note- If you wear glasses, take them off before doing this. It is incredibly foggy and can probably melt the plastic) Please try this on your own and let me know if you find this process to work for you and your glazes. To my knowledge, no one has written about this, and I have come up with this process myself. If this is a process that someone has written about, please let me know, for I do not want to take credit for something that isn't mine, even something as minuscule as opening the lid of your kiln.
  2. Hi everyone! I am currently experimenting with additional material, added to casting slip such as: sand, (rice) grains, paper, etc. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with that or can reference some interesting sources or examples to study? For some reason I do not find a lot (or any) examples of people working with these types of mixed media. Any tip or idea would be helpful! Thank you and I am looking forward to the feedback. Seb
  3. Hi everyone! I am currently experimenting with additional material, added to casting slip such as: sand, (rice) grains, paper, etc. I was wondering if anyone has some experience with that or can reference some interesting sources or examples to study? For some reason I do not find a lot (or any) examples of people working with these types of mixed media. Any tip or idea would be helpful! Thank you and I am looking forward to the feedback. Seb
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