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Found 49 results

  1. On a recent Clayflix tutorial by Lisa Naples she mentioned she fires her earthenware to cone 1 or 2, which reduces the water absorption rate by a huge amount and renders the clay almost vitreous. Does anyone have experience with this and, if so, what clay do you use?
  2. From the album: MOAR STUFFS

    Pretty self-explanatory.

    © Sarah Alderete

  3. Hello all, Just inherited a 13litre tub of clear earthenware glaze (duncan). I'm not a studio potter, but a sculptor (ceramic). I'm dreaming of making lots of new glazes from this tub. So I'm looking for a list of additives ie. Silicon carbide to make it foam and thicken, Zirconium oxide to whiten, Tin to blush. I'll be adding oxides and stains. But I want more info on new weird behaving ingredients to test. Any other ideas folks? Thank you all for your expertise, your feedback has helped me learn so much : )
  4. Does anyone have any input on why I’m getting intermittent peeling slip on my cone 1 red earthenware pots? It happens on a handful of pots from each firing. Typically, it’s on the edges of a pot (mostly near the rim). I’ve tried reformulating my slip recipe and am now using deflocculated slip (Martina Lantin’s recipe). My colors are from the base recipe with the addition of mason stains. I use Laguna red earthenware clay and fire to cone 1. I hoped the deflocculated slip would solve the problem since the water content is so low, but it hasn’t. I’m ready to give up! It’s so frustrating. I’d greatly appreciate advice on this. See the attached photo.
  5. Good Morning everyone, I'm considering moving from stoneware to earthenware and I would like your reasons for your throwing preference. Thank you and have a good Wednesday
  6. Hello, Recently I did a cone 03 glaze fire (fast firing) for earthenware pieces and during the firing at 1833 degrees F, the kiln received an error code for e-1. The firing was intended to reach 1987F but was not able to reach this temp due to the error. The effects were pinholing and glaze which had not matured, due to being underfired. I would like to re fire these pieces again, but am uncertain as to what temp will help the glaze mature. Earthenware, I was told by my instructor will crack if put through a second firing at the same temp (cone 03). Does anyone have an idea as to what temp will be appropriate for a re-glaze fire? I will not be using the same kiln (an automatic) and instead will be using a manual. Side note: the kiln was put through a test firing after the e-1 incident and seems to be working just fine..but since it has already received the code once and caused problems, I would prefer to use another kiln for the re fire of my glazed earthenware pieces.
  7. hi everybody, i'm a ceramic designer from michigan currently living in the netherlands. I would like to adapt one of Val Cushing's earthenware recipes to materials I can access in Europe. I think I have access to most of the chemicals expect for the Frit. Also I was wondering if there was an equivalent to EPK in Europe. E.P.K. (Plastic Kaolin) --- 10 Grolleg China Clay --- 20 Ball Clay --- 10 (Ferro) Frit # 3124 - 10 Talc - 10 Wollastonite - 10 Molochite - 30 + 2% Bentonite From what I gather so far the Molochite is pretty expensive from where I'm ordering it (Keramikos.nl) Cushing-LowFireClay.pdf
  8. Hello! Is it possible to high fire a glaze on the interior of a cup and around its lip, and to then pit fire? I'm trying to find a way to make pit-fired cups food/water-safe! I'm assuming that this process wouldn't affect the high-fire glaze, but perhaps the outside (unglazed) body would no longer be able to take in the marvelous colors produced in a pit fire? I'm new to this process, but will be doing a ton of experimenting over the coming months with local blue clay that I've begun harvesting. Thanks for any insights!
  9. Week 8 New quiz folks, another hodge podge of thought raising questions. All of the Earthenware clay bodies can be lumped into 3 arbitrary groups: pure earthenware, talc, and kaolin bodies fritted, grogged, and kaolin bodies pure earthenware, fritted, and talc bodies pure earthenware, kaolin, and fritted bodies As temperature decreases, flux increases, and ________________ decreases. Feldspar kaolin ball clay quartz The thinnest, and lightest of kiln shelves are made of a ____________________composition. high alumina cordierite nitride bonded silicon carbide ____________ glazes are used in a lot of studios to avoid throwing small bits of glazes down the drain Trash Raw Commercial Ash This weeks questions come from text in Electric Studio: Making and Firing, edited by Bill Jones, c. 2016, The American Ceramic Society Note from Pres: This is one of the newer books(paperback) in my library. If for nothing else, it has a large area on the use of , repair and firing of electric kilns. This includes sections on kiln furniture, repair and upkeep. Answers: c) pure earthenware, fritted, and talc bodies Pure earthenware clay-as mined it can contain varying amounts of flux and other impurities and it fires to whatever temperature its contaminants (sodium, potassium, iron, etc.) dictate. Fritted bodies think of it as porcelain (25 kaolin, 25 ball clay, 50 non-plastics) but with much of the non-plastics being frit and the frit often containing boron. Two subsets exist; one with lots of nepheline syenite as a flux source, another with whiting (calcium carbonate), which is problematic because its firing range is narrow. There are, of course, an infinite range of mixes of frits, feldspar, and nepheline syenite in this group. Talc bodies-similar to porcelain but they have use talc (magnesium aluminum silicate mineral) as the principal flux. Again, talc, frit, nepheline syenite, and feldspar are mixed in infinite variety to make low-fire clay bodies. The clearest example is 50 talc and 50 ball clay. Talc bodies have very little silicate glass, in fact they have very little silica and consequently they can be terribly weak better for figurines than for functional ware. (d) Quartz As firing temperature decreases, flux increases and quartz decreases. Natural Earthenware clay, as mined, contains all the sodium, potassium, iron and other fluxes necessary to fire to maturity without added materials. c) nitride bonded From an image caption. . . . The relative thickness of three 18x24-inch kiln shelves composed of different materials. The thickest(left), a 1-inch cordierite/high alumina shelf weighing 21 pounds; the next is a thinner but denser 3/4:-inch silicon carbide shelf that weighing 20 pounds; and the thinnest shelf, a 3/16-inch silicon carbide nitride bonded shelf weighing only 9 1/2 pounds! (a) Trash It’s a fairly common practice in large studios to make what’s called a “trash glaze†using the remaining bits of various shop glazes to avoid throwing glaze materials down the drain.
  10. Hello there, my partner and I are considering the challenging undertaking of a ceramics workshop at the next Burning Seed festival (Australia's Burning Man) in September, so quite a bit of research and development time. However, if this is an absolutely impossible task in your esteemed and learned opinions, it would be better to pull the plug early on. It will be held outdoors (under shelter), there will be no electricity available and the festival lasts 6 days. Budget isn't huge and conventional small gas kilns aren't easily available in Australia, so I've been considering the ceramic fibre flat pack gas kiln designs. At this point, I believe my biggest challenge is the timeframe - I feel like delivering a glazed piece on day 6 is likely unlikely, particularly considering the lack of drying time and the unpredictability of being exposed to the elements. Though if there is any way I could incorporate a candling feature into the flat pack design, perhaps this issue could be mitigated. Here are my thoughts on a timeframe: Day 1 & 2: Handbuilding workshop - earthenware clay, cups Day 3: Drying Day 4: Candling and bisque Day 5: Glazing and glaze firing Day 6: Finished! So my questions are: -Impossible? Yay or nay? -Is candling possible in the flat pack gas kilns? Perhaps with a smaller, less powerful torch attached? -Are there any better ways you think this could be achieved? -Do you have any other general advice? Thanks wonderful people, this forum is an absolute wealth of information and you're all great. If all else fails I'll just take some airdry clay and be done with it :-P
  11. Jeremy Randall: From Flat to Form WS02 – Saturday - Sunday, July 8 & 9, 2017 10-4pm, Fee: $200 members; $225 non-members www.baltimoreclayworks.org In this 2-day workshop, Jeremy will present his techniques for using tarpaper templates to make repeatable and adjustable pottery forms out of textured earthenware slabs. Focusing on the development of form and the terra sigilatta surface, he will assemble the form, discuss line and surface elements in his pots. Eccentric finishing techniques using non-clay elements like carpet tacks and wire for accent for his vessels will be demonstrated. Open to all skill levels Jeremy Randall received his B.F.A. from Syracuse University and his M.F.A. in ceramics from the University of Florida, and has been making his hand built pottery professionally since 2005. He currently lives in Tully, New York, where he owns and operates his home studio. Jeremy is a visiting instructor of art at Cazenovia College in Cazenovia NY, and an adjunct professor of art at Syracuse University. Jeremy has been involved in numerous national and international shows, is represented by Red Lodge Clay Center in Red lodge MT, The Clay Studio Philadelphia, Society of Arts And Crafts in Boston, among others. He also has work included in the permanent collections of Robert and Jane Myerhoff in Baltimore, Bailey Pottery Equipment permanent Collection, and the Southern Illinois University Museum in Carbondale, Illinois. Questions? Please contact Mary Cloonan at [email protected]<script data-cfhash='f9e31' type="text/javascript">/* */</script>
  12. From the album: 2017 Stuff

    The final result of my first animal head sculpture. I'm quite pleased with how this turned out--as you can imagine, I was sweating when this piece was in the kiln!! My fella, its intended and current owner, was extremely happy when he got it for Christmas. <3 Sculpted from Clay Art Center (of Tacoma)'s Xtra White lowfire earthenware, painted with Amaco, Mayco, Duncan, and Clay Art Center underglaze, fired to ^03.

    © Me and my fella

  13. From the album: Playing with mud 2016

    White earthenware bowl. Carved when leather hard. Grey underglaze painted into lines and scraped back to neaten. Transparent glaze.
  14. From the album: Fun Fun Fun

    These are really fun pieces called Yard Birds. Each one is hand painted with fun whimsical floral designs.

    © Pottery by Penny

  15. Now that I have my own studio and electric kiln, I'm moving from cone 10 clays to cone 5. This new world of mid-range clays, glazes, and firing is like starting all over again. I'm uncertain about whether cone 5/6 ceramics are correctly referred to as stoneware. Pretty sure that the term "earthenware" refers to low-fire ceramics, but I await the wisdom of those who know better about these things. :-)
  16. From the album: 2016

    Thrown bowls, cut at right angles to the rim. Thin slabs textured with bark, stamps, shells etc. - pieces attached to back part with front cut edge eased forwards to emphasise the contrast between the organic and engineered. Oxide washes applied at dry greenware stage, fixed in the bisqued firing. 3 back pieces were dipped in transparent glaze, front one dipped in tin white (to cover a repair that fired a different colour!). Fired to 1100oC in electric kiln.
  17. From the album: 2016

    3 creamers with cobalt tissue transfers applied through a home made stencil with transparent glaze over. Wedding favours - 2 test pieces (120 in total) glazed with Mayco Stroke and Coat. Individual name tags to be attached using teal ribbon. These are for my niece (a labour of love) - would never be cost effective as a commercial item, unless someone had money to throw away! Fired to 1100oC in electric kiln.
  18. From the album: Late 2015

    Fuzzy goat...I bet he's gonna eat those pansies. Measures 9.5" across, made of whiteware, greenware underglazed, fired to ^03.
  19. I've seen an ultra suede dry matte glaze used on earthenware. Is it a custome recipe? Done in colors too. Is it possible to get the same effect using other clays? See attached image. Thanks in advance for any information on the topic. MJ
  20. From the album: Early 2015

    Meet Rocky, the little box of dynamite. Sadly, this beautiful bowl did not survive the postman. Grrr... Measured 11" across, fired to ^03.
  21. From the album: Early 2015

    Here he is, Mr. Inlé himself. I could not, for the LIFE of me, get a good photo of him. No picture I took does this piece any justice... he's one of my favorites. Terracotta with white slip, ^03. Holds 15oz.

    © Sarah Alderete/Richard Adams

  22. From the album: Early 2015

    Yep. Another kitsune. Made from seward terracotta and white slip. Fired to ^03.

    © Sarah Alderete

  23. From the album: Early 2015

    Little Duncan here is a tripod bun. Isn't he precious? 10" wide-rimmed bowl, fired to ^03.

    © Sarah Alderete

  24. From the album: Early 2015

    This is Chewbacca, another bun who loves his blankies. He sadly passed away in late 2014, at the age of eleven. The piece is a wide-rimmed 10" bowl, fired to ^03.

    © Sarah Alderete

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