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Found 7 results

  1. Hi!! I have just finished a sculpture of a baby using smooth red clay. This is my third clay sculpture, but first without a teacher to guide me. With my previous sculptures, it was easier to remove the armatures.. there were less detailed areas which made it less traumatic to cut open/join back together. I was also far less particular about my sculptures then as can be seen by the fact I removed the armatures far too early. Is it okay for me to leave the paper inside when I fire it? Also, how slowly should I dry it to make sure fingers, toes and ears don't crack? Any other
  2. I'm having severe cracking problems on large 20 inch platters. I think it's from hairline cracks developing during drying. The platters were dried upside down for about four months inside large plastic bags. Every week or so I would open the end of the bag and flush some fresh air through to clear out some of the condensation on the inside of the bag. Some of the platters were thrown in the traditional pull a cylinder and spread it out technique. Others were made from a slab laid on the bat on the wheel head. It doesn't seem to make any difference which way they were made. Attached are pi
  3. I have just started making my own glazes, I purchased the raw materials and I used my friend’s hood in her lab to mix up some of the glazes. I have bisqued pieces and the first coat of the glaze went on easily, BUT when I went to apply the the second coat it dried almost as quickly as the brush touched the pot, making it nearly impossible to apply a second coat. It was as if the glaze crystalized upon touching like in a supersaturated solution, but the glaze was well mixed and not supersaturated. This was with “Tin Foil II” and “MFE Turnidge”. I did not wait long between coats…
  4. Having trouble drying handbuilt slabs of porcelain They are rather thin ( approx 1 & 1.5cm ) Have put them to dry sandwiched between two pieces of drywall And 80% have cracked in various places Any input would be GREATLY appreciated As is rather frustrating After so much trial and effort Luv Nicky
  5. Hello! I was hoping to have a discussion with anyone who may be more educated/experienced on the topic of porcelain warpage. Primarily what I am wondering is - is it possible to make porcelain wares without any warpage at all through glaze fire? I have tried a number of different drying and firing techniques but it seems impossible to achieve a perfect net form. I am slip casting, so my wares have very consistent wall widths. I have read time and time again that the design of the object dictates warpage (along with drying/firing techniques), but I can't really think of a design tha
  6. I am a hobbyist and I throw at my universities ceramic studio. I have a really hard time drying things right. I go on Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon. If I throw something on Tuesday, I cant get it to dry properly by Thursday. If I put a plastic bag over it it is still far too wet to trim on Thursday and if I leave it completely bare it gets to bone dry. I cant figure out what to do differently. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
  7. I'm looking for existing plans or tips to build a drying chamber for my pots. I have been for the past three years torch drying my pots to an ideal leather hard for trimming, this normally takes about 45 minutes for around 25 mugs and I'm trying to find a more efficient option that will give the same consistent results (I trim at a pretty specific stage of leather hard and torching has been the only way to consistently get there so far.) I'm basically searching for some type of humidity controlled chamber that I can leave pots in over night so they'll be ready to trim without the need for tor
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