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Found 25 results

  1. Since day 1 I wanted to do wood firing. I started with an electric kiln and although it is possible to do interesting things I'm still focused on ultimately doing Anagama. I cant truly test Cone 10 glazes in my electric and want to get as close to possible to that environment, which means a way to do reduction, neutral and oxidation. So I got a broke down Duncan kiln donated to me and the burner came in today so I'm super excited!!! Stripping it down tonight and getting the elements out then will figure out how to cut the burner port and the top opening. Then I have to find a 40 - 50 gallon ta
  2. Hey yall! I recently was given a kiln, the Cress E-23. I have never fired my own work prior to this time, opting to drop it off at a studio because I did not have the wiring for a personal kiln. I ran a successful bisque fire for the first time, and am wanting to do a glaze test this week. What is a good schedule for a cone 10 firing? Is it important to cool slowly? What knowledge can you share? The schedules I have found (though scarce) are like this SEG1 100/hr to 220 with a 1 hour hold SEG2 300/hr to 2300 with no hold SEG3 108/hr to 2361 with a 1 hour hold
  3. Hello, All! I am looking for info on favorite and best clear glazes to use with slip decorations at cone 10, and favorites to use with underglaze at cone 6 on porcelain slip! any and all help is appreciated. I am in my senior year of my ceramics undergrad, so photos of results could be super beneficial because I am not 100% certain of the properties I desire as of just yet. Thank you in advance!
  4. Hello! I've decided to start using flamware clay to make cooking pots and I'm wondering if anyone has any experience or knowledge to share. I worked with an artist for several months who works with flameware so I know a fair amount, however my knowledge is limited to her techniques and glaze recipes. The artist I worked with soda fires her work to cone 11. Has anyone tried firing flameware in a wood kiln? Thanks!
  5. Yes, I am tilting at windmills... I've been doing tons of trials with Amaco Velvet underglazes to introduce some bright colors to my pieces, and I currently work only in cone 10 reduction. I know what I'm up against, but still I must persist. I apply the underglazes on leatherhard so that they will be bisque-hardened to better withstand cover glazing. Yes, most of the colors will not be true, but I've found many I like—without a clear glaze cover. What I need to find is a clear gloss cover glaze that will not completely alter so many of the colors. Amaco's own house brand has its problem
  6. From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is the second "House Wine" vessel that I made. This time, underglaze transfers were added in an effort to build more depth to the surface. These are fun to make but seem to require a good bit of time on the workbench. This one is headed for a November show.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  7. From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is a close-up of the lid/stopper for the "House Wine" vessel. I like sneaking in some detail work on areas that don't show when the top is in place.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  8. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  9. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a 14oz-16oz wheel-thrown, stoneware mug with slab-built (black only) keys attached to a carved/altered keyboard design. The handle idea is NOT original but borrowed/copied/altered from another artist's project. When I find the name, I will certainly give proper attribution. Interior is glazed with Woo's Blue. Exterior details are black and white, brushed-on, Amaco Velvet underglazes with a top coating of clear. This is a concept mug for a commissioned gift project that is currently underway. The basic form and structure may remain the same but the color scheme for the actual projec

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  10. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mug, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work e

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  11. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a 12oz-14oz. stoneware mug with a piano/keyboard theme. The rim is wheel thrown and re-assembled into a hand-built, slab-constructed base that has been stamped and stretched/altered. Handle is pulled and attached after the rim is in-place and black keys have been cut from a slab and attached/scored & slipped. Interior and rim is glazed with Woo's Blue. Exterior parts are brushed-on Amaco Velvet underglaze sprayed with a couple of light coats of clear. Mug is fired to Cone 10 reduction. This is a concept mug, developed for Nashville's music scene and various associated festivals

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  12. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  13. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    A small set of hand-built mugs (slab construction) with wheel-thrown rims for family friends...both of whom are musically gifted. The orange has a look of atmospheric firing, but it is actually Amaco Velvet orange underglaze. The sheen over the underglaze is from a light coating of clear. The interior and rim were dipped in Woo's Blue. The details on the piano keys are brushed on. All of the rest of the glazing was sprayed. These are 12oz (.35ml) and stand approximately 5in. (12.7cm) tall. These were fired to Cone 10 in reduction.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA All rights reserved.

  14. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These are my prototypes for a new direction in hand-building...at least mostly hand-building. I have never been completely satisfied with the resulting rims on hand-built mugs, so I have incorporated wheel-thrown rims that feel so much better on the lips. The k-cup in the image is simply to add something appropriate for scale...and wouldn't be part of a sale *grin*. All of these are 12-14 oz. mugs and the style and production technique are very similar to the work of Sandra Blain (Thanks, Sandy!).

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All rights reserved.

  15. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a large, 3.5+ quart, mixing bowl that is part of a commission project for a retiring university dean. You might guess that the dean had something to do with the music program...and that would be correct. The bowl stands 7" tall and is a full 12" wide at the rim. The black keys were added individually to the wheel thrown piece and later brushed with Amaco Velvet underglaze. The exterior is glazed with Woo's Blue. The interior is Pete's Cranberry. A final light coat of clear was sprayed over the underglazes section for additional sheen. This is a Cone 10 reduction piece.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  16. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  17. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  18. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    The Fujita scale is a measure of a tornado's intensity based upon the amount of destruction it causes...or how much it eats. Having experienced the destruction, first hand, of an F2 glancing off my home, it wasn't difficult to put a face on the monster that caused destruction in my neighborhood. Only now, new things grow from where the damage occured...thus a container for a plant with the form of the dark cloud of demolition impressed into the side.

    © Copyright 2015 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN. All Rights Reserved.

  19. From the album: Tobys Pottery

    3/4 lb test clay . translucent porcelain

    © dont copy

  20. From the album: Tobys Pottery

    3/4 lb test clay . translucent porcelain

    © dont copy

  21. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on.
  22. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on. These are stained then dip glazed into Woo's Blue and Honey Lustre, fired to Cone 10 reduction.
  23. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on. These are stained then dip glazed into Honey Lustre and St. John's Black, fired to Cone 10 reduction.
  24. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on. These are stained then dip glazed into Ohata Kaki and Mac Celedon, fired to Cone 10 reduction.
  25. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Wheel-thrown, stoneware containers, approximately 12"-14" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into the slab built handle on the lid. High-fired, Cone 10 with stain and Woo's Blue sprayed on exterior. Interior is glazed with Ohata Kaki.
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