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Found 13 results

  1. Hello new wannabee potter here. I'm throwing the same thing over and over to try and get better at the basics but not sure what to do with all the clay that I use to practice. I'm keeping some pieces to see how they turn out after glazing and firing but I don't want to throw all this other clay. I know you can use plaster boards to dry it out and rewedge but I'm in a shared studio and there isn't space to leave plaster boards out for long periods of time. Any tips? Thanking you in advance!
  2. Hello from a newbie to the forums and to ceramics! I’ve read info from the Ceramic Arts Network for a while, but I’ve just joined the forum tonight. I’m an intermediate handbuilder and beginner thrower looking to expand my skill set and absorb as much knowledge as I can! My ceramics teacher is a sculpture artist and not a ceramicist, so while I’ve learned a ton about handbuilding from her, there’s a lot she says she can’t teach me about glaze, special firing techniques, and advanced throwing. I’m looking to build a collection of great, thorough resources (forum posts here, names of people to follow, blogs, websites, articles, videos, online courses, whatever) to educate myself further. I was hoping some of you kind folks will have some that immediately come to mind that you can point me to (the internet is vast, y’all). If there’s something or someone you found helpful while learning, chances are I will, too! I’m especially interested in anything to do with glazing, firing, and throwing. I’ve only used commercial glazes, but I’d love to learn about mixing my own and all the cool effects you can get. I’m working on getting a kiln of my own, but am currently limited in that I’m using the one on the university campus where I work, and thus can’t do what I want when I want. But after I get my kiln set up, sky’s the limit. Thank you in advance for any pointers you’re willing to throw my way! Cheers!
  3. Hello! I am fairly new to throwing and have just bought my own wheel, a Rhode HMT 500. First few weeks of throwing everything was greet, but now whenever I throw directly on the wheel head I am getting this black substance that feels gritty. It’s actually really abrasive and hurts my hands after a while. I thought it may be residue from some more heavily grogged clay I was throwing, but I have cleaned and cleaned the wheel head. On a totally clean wheel, if I wet my finger and let it run over the wheel head I can see and feel this black gritty substance build up. Does anyone know what it might be or how I can get rid of it?
  4. Hi folks, no new questions in the pool, so I will pose one. I was recently watching a youtube video posted from House Beautiful about Heath Ceramics in S.F.. The video shows some interesting things including the use of a Griffin Grip! This production pottery also shows quite a bit of trimming, some throwing and ware on the storeroom walls. I was enthralled with the amount of trimming done with the GG, and how much trimming was done. I had always been taught to trim only the base, and make my throwing thin enough to not need trimming, and to use ribs when in need of smooth surfaces. Quite different story here in the video. This makes me reevaluate my values in the way of time, expediency, and even aesthetics. I have on occasion believed a piece was too heavy, and would trim some weight off up the sides, but very infrequently, Not being judgemental, as a teacher I would always encourage/require my students to get the most out the clay walls even testing them on height/weight throwing. Now I wonder if I was imposing my own learned biases on my students. So it brings to mind the question for my own justification or approval/disapproval. .. . QotW: How much do you trim? best, Pres
  5. Looking to buy my first wheel for home (will be in my garage). I throw porcelain including larger platters/plates so I need a two part splash pan. I’m deciding between a Brent C or CXC or a Bailey ST-X or XL. I have used a Brent but not the Bailey. Considering the Bailey given the larger splash pan, trim guard attachment and the fact that it is a bit cheaper. But don’t want to be penny wise and pound foolish.... would love some feedback from those with experience on these wheels. Thanks!
  6. Hi all! New to this forum and excited to connect. Due to the pandemic, I have decided to invest in my own home based studio. I recently came upon a Soldner kick wheel after years of primarily using brent/shimpo electric wheels. I’ve been searching the Internet for tips on making this transition to primarily throwing on a kick wheel, but to no avail. Does anyone have tips / tricks / recommendations on making the switch to solely throwing on a kick wheel ? Anyone have access to videos of centering on a kick wheel? Thanks!
  7. Hi there! I've seem to have gotten into a funk with centering my balls of clay on the wheel. I can get it pretty centered, but it's always about a millimetre off...Here's my technique: Cone up by pushing inwards. Cone down with the meat of my right thumb pressing down and the meat of my left thumb guiding it down. However, I've been having issues with the mushroom effect. Any suggestions as to how to cone all the way down to the wheel without the mushroom forming? Once I get it relatively centered and in a puck shape, I'll try to fix the millimetre off by pushing inwards from the side using the meat of my left hand below my pinky finger and pushing downwards from the top using the karate chop of the outer edge of my right hand, also by the pinky finger. However, this usually pushes my piece ever more off center. So I've been sticking with coning up and down several times and starting to pull my piece with the millimetre off feeling. Any tips & tricks that might be helpful? Thanks!
  8. Hi! I have been making pots for about 7 years and in the past 4 have struggled with small s-cracks appearing on the bottom of about 75% of my pots. The s-cracks are usually around a half inch long, thin, and only on the underside of the pot - never go all the way through and therefore the pots are all fully functional, just annoyingly cracked. In the photo attached, you'll see 3 cracked pots, and 2 planters that did not crack. My theory is that something is amiss in the center of my pots that causes stress & cracking during drying - because typically, when I make planters that have the centers removed, cracks do not appear. The cracks don't show up to my knowledge til after the bisque fire (though because my studio fires my pottery, there are usually a few days that I'm not seeing the piece before it's loaded in the kiln.) I have tried just about every remedy I can get my hands on and still can't manage to kick these cracks to the curb. My current regimen is: 1. Wedge each piece of clay (ram's head) 40x each. 2. Align clay on wheel so the spiral-y part is horizontal per this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7oIZiXmXFU 3. Tap clay to center and use a finger to create a seal between clay and bat. 4. Add water, press down on the clay and get into flat hockey puck-ish shape. 5. Cone up and down three times. I make sure my cone is very cylindrical, with the bottom being almost as narrow as the top, which I read was important for preventing cracking. I make the top of the cone teeny-tiny and focus on getting air bubbles out of that portion. 6. During coning down process, I bring the piece back into a hockey puck shape and run my finger across the top towards the center, occasionally finding air bubbles there. 7. Bring out the walls and compress bottom religiously with my thumb, a kidney rib and my sponge. About 10 times, compressing from the outside of the base to the center. Occasionally, I'll feel little air bubbles during this step and will continue compressing until I've popped them. 8. Continue to compress and flatten bottom as I shape the piece. I don't let water sit in the piece. 9. Let the piece dry slowly and evenly on absorbent surface like canvas or foam (covered after a few hours). Dry with bottoms up once sturdy enough to stand. Something I've noticed: Often when I use the wire to take pieces off the bat, there is a small air pocket right in the center of the clay that appears both on the remaining clay on the bat (picture attached), and on the piece itself. The indentation in the bottom center of the piece is never more than 1/16-1/8 of an inch deep I'd say. It's something I trim off later in the process, but seems to correlate with the pots that end up cracking. A hypothesis: Could I be creating these air pockets during the coning up process? I.e. as I press the clay in & up the bottom air pocket forms? Maybe making my cone so cylindrical is part of the problem? Another potential hypothesis: My wedging is bad and introduces too many air bubbles. Would I be better off using clay straight from the bag? (Or, sigh, trying to get better at wedging?) Last note: I prefer a flat bottom to a footed bottom. It's possible I get less cracks when I trim feet, but I haven't really investigated. Any advice you have on ending this years-long struggle would be so, so appreciated! S-Crack Photo Bat with Air Bubble
  9. Guest

    JBaymore BottleForm

    From the album: Images For Misc. Posts

    Image of a bottle form made from the altered clay shown in another image.
  10. Guest

    JBaymore VaseForm

    From the album: Images For Misc. Posts

    A vase form made from the clay in a prior posting here.
  11. Guest

    JBaymore PotsDryingInSun

    From the album: Images For Misc. Posts

    Pots drying in the sun, getting ready for an anagama firing.
  12. cmdutcher

    close up

    From the album: Neriage

    Stained stoneware with Mason stain 6339 (royal blue) and threw it with regular gray stoneware. We'll see how it fires!
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