Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Thermal'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Terms of Use
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest
    • Community Marketplace – Buy/Sell/Trade/Free

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 2 results

  1. A few quick questions for the glaze experts out there. Background: I'm very excited to be creating my first base glazes - a simple cone 6 clear for a white (talc free) clay body. I also have a dark red clay body with obviously a high iron content. And then after that I will be going for a cream color glaze and then a temmoku. I have no real interest at the moment in bright glossy colors. I have 2 different options for silica - sand (white) and flint (270M) - Which is the best starting point or should I just get some of both? I want to give myself the most possibilities for testing and using in secondary glaze recipes. For the base white recipe I want to use it calls for Tin Oxide Tin Oxide vs Zircopax - Tin Oxide is REALLY expensive and I am reading a lot that Zircopax although it can be substituted at around 2:1 for Tin Oxide, it tends to kill the colors that oxides produce a bit. Not too big a problem for me I wouldn't think at the moment and none of the Temmoku I want to test calls for it. Does Zircopax work in a wide range of recipes and does it have any caveats to watch out for? Thanks much! Very excited to get going and will post results as I go.
  2. Kilns: Why and How Sharon Art Center Campus of New Hampshire Institute of Art Professor John Baymore This one day seminar-type workshop will provide participants with a fundamental understanding of ceramic kilns and firing operations that they can bring back to their own studio operations. The presented material will cover underlying concepts that drive kiln function and operation, and how that information relates to designing, constructing, and firing them. This module will also assist participants in evaluating commercial units for potential purchase. Presentations will touch on gas, wood, and electric fired kilns, giving a diverse audience some practical tools. Useful handouts and a copy of one kiln plan will be provided to all participants. Prerequisite: Intermediate ceramics skills. Limit: 15 Sat, July 12 / 9 am – 4 pm / 1 Day SCER073 / Tuition: $80 TO REGISTER: (603) 836-2564 MANCHESTER CAMPUS: IN PERSON: Mon – Fri, 8:15 am – 4:30 pm Fuller Hall, 156 Hanover St. BY EMAIL: CERegistration@nhia.edu BY MAIL: New Hampshire Institute of Art, Continuing Education Office, 148 Concord Street, Manchester, NH 03104-4858 BY FAX: (603) 641-1832 SHARON ARTS CENTER CAMPUS: IN PERSON: Mon – Fri, 9 am – 3 pm BY EMAIL: register@sharonarts.org BY MAIL: Sharon Arts Center, 457 NH Route 123, Sharon, NH 03458-9014 SCHOLARSHIPS: A limited number of scholarship funds are available to adults, youth and teens based on financial need. Scholarships are awarded on a first come, first serve basis. An application form and deadline information is available on our website at www.nhia.edu/ce or www.sharonarts.org. http://www.nhia.edu/assets/Uploads/PDFs/CE--CT/NHIA5866x9CEsum14web.pdf
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.