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  1. I search on the forum but did not find an answer to this. It possible to brush porcelain slip on white stoneware (on leather hard, like Hakeme, but covering the body completely), or would the shrinkage difference cause the porcelain to flake off? Thanks a lot! Lucia
  2. I am an experienced potter trying to find the right porcelain for my work. As of late I have been using cone 6 Laguna 15 because it is super white and super vitreous. Both of these things are important to me because I leave much of the exterior of my pots unglazed, so the porcelain needs to look very white and not stain from absorption over time. However this clay cracks like crazy!!! About 50% of the mugs I make have cracks around the handles. Also, lots of cracks along the bottoms. I have tried everything I can think of to prevent cracking- compressing like CRAZY, adding more clay to attachments, different glaze/clay combos, slower firings with holds... at this point I’m wondering if it’s me or if it’s just the clay. Has anyone else had this problem with Laguna 15? Has anyone found alternative super white, vitreous clays that don’t have cracking problems? This clay is so beautiful I wish I could figure this problem out, but a 50% loss rate is too high!
  3. Hi! I'm totally inexperienced in this new world of clay and I have questions. I am planning on making tiny porcelain ceramics for jewelry. I have acquired a brand new kiln, some samples of colored porcelain, and a 25lb block of Suzuki white porcelain. I'm reading that I can fire the Suzuki porcelain to cone 6, which is good because the glazes I'm looking at can also fire up to cone 6. Has anyone done test pieces with this clay? My items will be very small as I plan on adding them to other pieces and adding other things to them after firing, if that makes sense. I have no idea what I'm doing. I need guidance so I don't ruin things when they arrive. How do I care for my kiln? Will kiln paper work? Kiln wash? Can I dip pieces and just lay them on a shelf that's been kiln washed or will it stick? How long and how hot for bisque, and for the next firing? These are going to be smaller than what most people do for test pieces I'd imagine. Does anyone know what happens if you put a piece of copper in a divot of clay and then fire? Would I risk a piece exploding or ruining my kiln if I tried to add any metals on top of recesses on the surface of my pieces? I'd be grateful for any advice you could give. I have lots of creative ideas and ambition but don't want to ruin my new expensive toys as a result of experiments. Blessings, Azloen
  4. Dear colleagues, I have to make a decision as I could have a Venco Super Twin in a few days here in my studio what would normally take months to be delivered and I have a big order of lots of plates to throw. In my research about pugmills I have come as far as that I think I have to decide between buying a Peter Pugger vpmss20 and a Venco Super Twin, both stainless steel and de-airing. I throw porcelain and run a studio production, means around 2 tons a year, getting more (sorry, I'm not a native speaker)... I'll need it in the first place for replacing the wedging of new porcelain clay as I find this extremely power- and timeconsuming for production. I let the wet material dry a little bit down to have a stiffer clay for throwing thin bigger pots. That means the clay has stiffer parts outside from the drying and softer ones inside even if I dry it slowly under a soft fabric to avoid too fast drying. I hope such a machine could mix and de-air it for having a homogen porcelain body ready for throwing. That's what I intend mainly. To reclaim crap is also an idea but not really important as I can sell trimming crap for a small money to someone who re-uses it for small sculptures. i know in stoneware de-aired clay is a gorgeous thing for throwing, but porcelain is different and it seems to absorb air whenever possible so the vacuum effect might be a problem? What I have heard about the Peter Puggers: Some potters have problems with porcelain coming out with no plasticity. Also heard a rumour that the pugging chamber of the PP is too short for good de-airing. The advantage of PP seems to be that the clay can be stiffened or dried down easily and that any stiffness doesn't seem to be a problem at all as the mill is very strong so it won't stop with stiffer clay. About the Venco: the twin spiral shall have a quite well mixing effect but the de-airing pump shall also not be so good. Another disadvantage of the Venco is that I heard it stands still if the clay is too stiff and you have to open it to pull the clay out before going on with softer clay. I'm afraid I will have spent so much money to have small air bubbles in my fired ware what must be quite horrifying and / or that I have a machine that stops when i put a bit stiffer clay for bigger pots into it. It would be SO GREAT if anyone working with porcelain with these machines could share his/her experiences... thanks so much, claude
  5. Weekend - August 6-8, 2021 Fabulous Surfaces on Porcelain Jewelry: Color, Texture, Pattern Colleen Williams Embrace colored porcelain by working small in this class where ceramics and jewelry meet. Explore handbuilding methods and surface techniques for ceramics of any scale. Use layered slips, resists, stamping, sgraffito and more to decorate jewelry "canvases." Learn basic jewelry skills to assemble several pieces to wear home. Beginner; Materials fee, payable to instructor, $20 for 5, 4-6 ounce balls of colored porcelain, 1 lb. of white porcelain, small plaster forming molds, paint pot strip with underglazes, 24 ga. nichrome wire, 18" sterling silver wire, leather cording. The instructor will also bring Items that each participant will have access to including assorted sterling silver and niobium jewelry findings, assorted glass beads, assorted colored porcelain slips and assorted resists and texture tools $360 Registration and Information
  6. Attempting to glaze very thin slip cast cups. The casting slip is a commercially mixed ^6 porcelain bisqued to ^05. I’m using a commercial transparent dip glaze recommended by the supplier. When dipped, the glaze remains completely wet on the cup and then sags and cracks off completely as it slowly dries. I know I’m in the dark without further information about the make up of either the slip or the glaze and that the real solution will be mixing my own glaze but I just wanted to make sure that I’m not getting something wrong in the mechanics of firing and application. My first thought is that the very thin porcelain over fired in the bisque firing and is therefore not porous enough to take the glaze however it does absorb water when soaked. Would I be better off using a spray application as a starting point? I am a newbie and very much finding my way here. Thanks
  7. From the album: July 2019

    Thrown porcelain bottles (sometimes off the hump) - 3-4” tall. Underglaze transfer decoration applied to leather hard clay. Bisqued to 1000oC. Poured and dipped in transparent glaze. Fired to cone 6/7 (1200oC)
  8. Hello ! I received my new skutt KS 609 and test fired it successfully given that I have never worked with a kiln sitter. I will mainly be using it to make small stoneware and porcelain components for jewelry and wall hangings. My question is has anyone tried to fast fire cone 6 unglazed stoneware and porcelain to vitrification ? I only want to fast fire for small beads and components. Also, is it safe to stack cone 6 stoneware plates without warping (slow fired of course) I’m fairly new to mid fire clay bodies Thanks! Asmaa
  9. From the album: July 2019

    Thrown porcelain. Wax resist all over, carved when leather hard. Black underglaze inlay painted over and wiped back. Bisqued to 1000oC. Orange underglaze highlights added. Transparent glaze poured and dipped then fired to cone 6/7.
  10. Hi ...... Have some porcelaine cups that have reached the bone dry stage .Am wondering if I can still use engobes or slip on them before bisque firing ? Also can engobes or slip be used on bisque ware ? and then does one glaze as usual ? Thankyou Nicky
  11. Hi ....... Fired two batches of porcelain ware .The one was “ onefire “ And the other “bisque» My problem is they got mixed together. Now I cannot tell the difference as I want to glaze the bisque ware .Is there a way of testing the difference Thank you Nicky
  12. Hi there! I was wondering if anyone knows what the composition of Audrey Blackman porcelain is? I've searched high and low and the only info I got was that it contains quartz. I sell ceramics on a very small scale and someone is enquiring if my work vegan and I have no idea!!
  13. I am new to ceramics and can't seem to find any info on creating a strong white slip for decoration, not casting.Porcelain clay , I guess would be the optimum. If so how please? Powder ?...dried clay rewetted? Plus any additions? How would this work as far as compatability goes with stoneware clays? Also I would like to make an engobe white to use on bisque...any ideas please ?
  14. Hi I am using Audrey Blackman porcelain and am interested in using stains into the clay. Can anyone suggest which stains are good to use and can I just wedge it in? Many thanks. Debs
  15. Hi, I have a question about the compressive strength of porcelain vs stoneware, if both clays are modelled with the same thickness and are both cone 6 clays. Which one would be stronger or better to use for large (4-5ft) sculptures? Thanks, Callum
  16. Hello everyone! Another question from me: is it possible to cast a flat plate (without a foot) with a one-piece plaster mold? I am usually throwing a prototype with a simple white clay on a wheel, then wait until its dry enough and cast a mold, but when i tried making a plaster mold for a flat plate, plaster seemed to heavy for the clay to hold, clay got softer and caved in. As the result: the mold is with a little knob in the middle. Any advices? Thank you! Nata
  17. Hey all, I was informed a while back that most commercial slips are deflocculated with Darvan, which can cause adverse effects (warping) on the resulting wares depending on the temperature of the room in which casting occurs. I have found in my testing that this is certainly the case, trying my best to control all other variables within reason only changing the temp of the room. Cold temps certainly seem to increase warping. What I'm wondering is if anyone has any ideas regarding what the ideal temperature would be for slipcasting with darvan in it. I am trying to minimize warping as much as possible without having to heat my workspace to unnecessarily high temps. I can't seem to find anything about this online and would appreciate any direction greatly! Cheers, Cole
  18. Hello everyone, I find your site tremendously insightful and factual, and this is my first post here. I'm a fairly proficient handbuilder and sculptor but have never worked in porcelain. I need to know whether these lentil-shaped hollow beads will fall flat in the highfire glaze firing, with or without glaze. They are slightly larger than a quarter in diameter, and thickness varies from 11 to 13 mm. A classmate at community college handbuilding class gave me the porcelain clay because I just wanted to see whether I prefer it for my hollow beads. They all have holes, not showing in pic. My concern stems from the fact that I had read that walls can collapse, in porcelain, if not exceeding 30 degrees angle. I did do a LOT of searching and reading, but could not find an answer. Photo shows the bisqued hollow porcelain beads in the foreground, and in background are beads from my same molds, in my usual stoneware clay. I do have Kanthal wire which I usually use in my own, small, low-fire kiln but I'm sure the kiln tech at the college (with a vast volume of stoneware and porcelain pieces to fire) will not be game to be bothered with my little experiment so my intent is to just have her fire them on the shelf, unglazed, to maturity ... and then I will decorate them by other means, if I choose, after seeing the result (hoping to get some translucency?) So, in summing up ... do you think these little lentils will collapse and go flat when fired to the porcelain clay's maturity? I believe it is Cone 6. Thank you for any input!
  19. Hi guys , We are INSULATORS manufacturer HOLLOW INSULATORS have these problems of ID OVERFIRED problem rest of all material is OK If we talk abouts shed(which is thin portion of INSULATORS ) is OK stem is OK but in ID facing OVERFIRED problem Top portion of ID approx..300mm is OK Bottom portion of ID approx ..300mm is OK But middle portion of ID which is 500-600mm is OVERFIRED How can be short out this problem If we talk about other material like bushing is OK in same kiln Note:- HOLLOW ITEM FIRED IS BOTH HANG AND WITHOUT HANG BUT FACING PROBLEM CONSISTENT ... Please suggest new firing technics What are change required in kiln schedule or state of firing Regards VIKASH BHAGAT
  20. Hi all, Second time posting here and I’m hoping you can help! Hopefully this is the right place to be for a troubleshooting question like this. Im currently working from a recipe for Val Cushing’s Cone 6 Porcelain Slip. grolleg: 15% tile 6: 15% Epk: 3% om4: 10% flint: 25% neph sy: 30% gerstley borate: 2% —————————— Sodium silicate: .0028% calgon: .0005% When I mixed this before, as now, I subbed the deflocculants with Darvan. I mixed it successfully then, but I’m currently have difficulty. I know that darvan generally subs for sodium silicate at 2-1, so bearing that in mind, that’s where I started. I kept adding darvan in small 5g increments up to 100g in a 10000g recipe. That seems like far too much, but maybe I’m wrong? I feel like I’m on the other side of that deflocculation bell curve some how and missed my mark. Every time I come back to the studio the slip is gelled thick but never settled and never develops a skin. When I’ve added more darvan, the slip temporarily thins, but seems to rebound to being too thick the next day. Can the casting process indicate overdeflocculation? If so, in what ways? What should I be looking out for other than settling and a skin in my bucket? Can anyone offer any advice on this recipe or deflocculants? I’ve been doing some hard research and testing and can’t nail it down. My current gravity is measuring at 1.71, so I’m hesitant to add more water, since according to some other online sources I should be aiming between 1.7 and 1.8. I’m wondering if I should throw caution to the wind and say “this slip just needs more water than most”. Ive mixed this slip before with great success two years ago. I have no clue what I did right then. Dumb luck haha. Any suggestions or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  21. Hi, I have problems trying to find the answers to this question. I want the "paint" I use to be something like China ink, but that it doesn't run and that fires well to cone 10 without loosing color. Thank you for your help!
  22. From the album: July 2019

    Thrown porcelain vase, cut vertically from rim. Textured slab attached with slip. Copper & cobalt oxide wash applied to bone dry greenware. Bisqued to 1000oC. Transparent glaze poured inside and brushed on textured addition. Fired to 1200oC (cone 6/7). Gold lustre highlights added then fired to 780oC.
  23. From the album: July 2019

    Thrown porcelain. Wax resist all over, carved when leather hard. Black underglaze inlay painted over and wiped back. Bisqued to 1000oC. Transparent glaze poured and dipped then fired to cone 6/7. Gold lustre applied before third firing to 780oC.
  24. From the album: LeeU Hidden Mask Series

    This piece was fired in the anagama kiln at the Sharon Art Center in NH.
  25. From the album: LeeU Hidden Mask Series

    This piece was fired in the anagama kiln at the Sharon Art Center in NH. It is porcelain with a celedon glaze on the facial planes and a temmoku on the stamped area. The orange on the right side is on unglazed clay and is an attribute of the firing.
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