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Found 24 results

  1. Long time listener, first time caller here. I love the Turquoise Matte glaze from Coyote, but it isn't food safe. If I used a food safe glaze on the body of the mug could I still use the matte glaze on the handle or should I keep all glaze on the mug food safe?
  2. I used to fall into the affectation camp. Back in the day, if I could sell a mug for 6 bucks, I was pretty happy. I can throw pretty fast, and I'd throw the mug, undercut the foot slightly with a wooden knife, wire it off, and it was done, except for the handle. I'd wipe the edge with a sponge, and leave the wire marks. High volume was the key to making my ration of macaroni and cheese. But recently I got into throwing yunomis-- handle-less cups for tea and wine Most of the great potters whose yunomis I looked at used turned footrings, even if some of them were what I would call a lit
  3. I purchased a beautiful mug just recently and I am trying to figure out the artists name but I am having trouble. It looks to be Hcbie Ltcbie Locbie Hobie .... I have done an image search and can't seem to find anything! https://imgur.com/5blvEpN https://imgur.com/NidHIOW
  4. Will be firing a bisque fire of porcelain ware Mugs without handles What is the best way to fire ( thinking of warpage ) Should the rims be facing up or down Wondering if it makes a difference Thank you Nicky
  5. Hi! I know there have been many threads about wholesaling. I am particularly interested in wholesaling mugs to a cafe for them to use as servingware. Is there any difference in what I should charge (60% vs. 50%) since they won't be turning around and reselling for a profit? Thanks!
  6. I have been using the same clay,slip and glazes purchased from a local ceramic shop. Everything has turned out beautifully but I got a new mug mold that will NOT stop giving me issues! The mug is slip cast using low fire slip. I fire to bisque..all good. Then I apply my glaze and fire..I let the kiln cool for at least 12 hours and still around the rim and handles I keep getting light crazing. No matter what I do..less glaze, more glaze, longer firing, soaking on high, the mug will still craze. Keep in mind, I haven't changed anything from the other ceramics I'm glazing, which all turn out wit
  7. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  8. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  9. From the album: Fun Fun Fun

    © �Pottery by Penny

  10. Guest

    Mugs

    From the album: John Baymore's Clay Work

    Two woodfired American style mugs. Local granite, local clay and wood ash glaze. Both were sold at a solo exhibition held in Japan in 2011.

    © copyright John Baymore - all rights reserved

  11. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  12. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These two mugs are a hybrid combination of hand-built and wheel-thrown construction. The rim is the only wheel-thrown piece and is included only because I have never been quite satisfied with my efforts to hand-build rims on mugs. Unique to the stamped-on, tennis net theme are the athletic shoe & tennis ball finials to the pulled handle. The mugs are 14oz-16-oz capacity stoneware, fired Cone 10 reduction. Interior glaze is Woo's Blue. Exterior is clear, sprayed on in two light coats.

    © Copyright 2017 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  13. From the album: Mad About Pottery

    The mugs are made out of a beige clay I then coated the surface with a rustic green glaze and added a light touch to the rim with a light grey glaze.

    © Gittit Rad-El

  14. From the album: Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Mugs, white ^6 stoneware, overall incising, colored transparent glaze, footed, pulled handle.
  15. From the album: Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Autumn Leaf Mugs, dark stoneware ^6, sgraffito through underglazes, dotted accents, autumn leaf design, pulled handles, colorful.
  16. From the album: Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Autumn Leaf Mugs, white ^6 stoneware, underglazes with a wax resist and blackline leaf design, dotted accents, footed, pulled handles.
  17. From the album: Mugs, mugs and more mugs!!

    Mugs, ^6 dark stoneware, sgraffito through underglazes, dotted accents, footed.
  18. From the album: Work in Progress

    Having a mad and intense slip trailing session. I'm making these mugs specially as gifts for my husband's coworkers.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  19. From the album: Work in Progress

    To date this is the most I've ever thrown in one session. A full half box of clay and ohhh were my hands ever sore the next day.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015

  20. From the album: High Fire

    These are some thick hand built plus pulled handles I am working on for my mugs.
  21. From the album: Work in Progress

    I had drawn up this slip trailing design, then wanted to try it out on different shapes of mug to see which one I like best. The good news is, I really like the design. The bad news is, I still couldn't tell you which one I like better! The branch goes up from the bottom on one side of the handle and down from the top on the other side so no matter where you look at the mug you get a different view every time.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade, all rights reserved

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