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Found 219 results

  1. I have a question regarding some theory I read in the text The Kiln Book. On page 78 of the 4th Edition, it states that: "At the point where the exit flues enter the chimney, they should be restricted so that the chimney cross section is larger than this flue area" In the diagram (3-11) beneath this, it shows decreasing the point of entry to the chimney by 25% (from 4 bricks to 3), coming from the kiln exit flue. What's the thought behind this? I'm happy to trust my elders, but I'd also like to know what the theory is. I'm curious how this decrease affects the firing, vs keeping the same area of flow in the inlet flue>exit flue>chimney entry>chimney. As I'm building a chimney coming up in the next couple weeks, I'd love to figure this out. I can taper in the walls of the exit flue to the entry point of the chimney, which would accelerate flow heading into the chimney (while also creating slight backpressure?), which would then open back up to the full area of the chimney as it rises. Thoughts? Thanks in advance!
  2. Hi! I was running a cone 5 glaze with my skutt electric kiln and forgot to turn on my enviro vent. When I realized it was already finished and at 500F. I have the KMT so was able to see a graph of the firing which looked fine, but it did fire in 4 hrs instead of the regular 13hrs. What problems could this cause ??? Could this hurt my kiln for future firings? Vent is on now and another fan in the studio cause it definitely smells. Thanks!
  3. Background: I made oval earrings (oval shape with large oval cutout so they are more like an oval outline) (15 pairs) on the claybody Highwater Clays Little Loafers (Cone 6). I painted designs on them with Amaco underglazes. The tops of each have small holes (i'll put metal hoops them after they are all done). They have already been bisque fired. I also have three other pairs of earrings that have only small earrings. Goal: Now, I want to put a clear glaze on them and glaze fire them. Ideally, in one batch. What I have in my possession vs. what I could acquire. The clear glaze I already have is a Zinc-free Cone 5/6 glaze. However, I can get a different, low-fire clear glaze. I also have a bead rack I borrowed with some long rods that are too large for the small holes in the earrings. My question: I found this image online, in which someone made oval earrings very similar to mine and a bead rack with hooks. It appears they used kiln safe metal wire to make hooks. The hooks appear to be large but small enough to fit through small holes. I wonder what your opinion of that is. I'd have to figure out what gauge to get. A ceramicist nearby has a jewelry tree so I may take the bisquefired earrings over to her and try to see how they fit on her jewelry tree and that might tell me approx. the size wire those jewelry trees use and I could get the same gaugue, bend and make hooks out of them to hang on the rods. One potter has said this ^ should work if I order some nichrome or kanthal wire. They also think it would be fine to do with the Cone 6 clear glaze I have and would be fine to fire up to a Cone 6 (although we actually do Cone 5). Part of me wonders if I should just get low-fire glaze, try the hook thing, and low fire it to be on the safer side. Other solution: As I typed this, I just realized a possible other solution…1.) get a low fire brushable glaze, 2.) simply put rods through the large oval (taking care not to glaze the inside edge or anywhere where the rod will rest) instead of worrying about the small circles at all. It’s not as ideal but would probably hardly be noticeable. 3.) Fire at a low temp 04-06. That might work for the oval earrings but not for the winking eyes.
  4. Hello everyone, I have bought a second-hand electric Rohde 5024 Kiln (230V) and a TR 305 controller. I have done only 2 biscuit firing at 950C and noticed the pieces were almost vitrified; our mocal clay is rich in iron oxide. I recently did a slow glaze firing at 900C and my work melted down, some kiln shelves are distorted and even broken by the heat. The kiln electric plug is stick to the wall socket.Do you have an idea of what has happened? The whole situation is devastating as I live in West Africa and do not have potters, technicians or manufacturers who know about electric kilns. I have contacted the manufacturer and they said they could not help. I am not familiar with kilns and hope someone could help with the matter.Thank you so much in advance
  5. Hi, My wife managed to twist and snap this! Can anyone tell me what it called exactly as I cant seem to find replacements on t'interweb. If anyone has any surefire (sic) ways of repairing it, then that would be helpful too. It is to sit in the top vent hole of a Cromartie portable kiln (Hobbytech 40) and have a thermocouple through it (trying to build a Raspberry Pi controller). Cheers Andy
  6. Hi, I am looking for some advise if possible. I fired my kiln last night but the kiln didn't reach full temperature. I looked at the cone I have in my cone stand and it is not melted. The cone in the sitter either melted or fell off and the kiln shut off. Can I re-fire? As I have not unloaded it, can I just turn it on? Thanks Mal
  7. Hi, I am new to ceramic glazing. Are there any methods that can duplicate fire-based glazing on ceramics? I work at home, so i do not have access to kiln. I have read there are oven-based glazes and non-fire based glaze. How effective are they in terms of the glaze (will it be similar to fire glazed plate)? Thank You.
  8. have inherited a Gare Kiln Model # 1210 Serial # 10.7.84 hertz 60 volts 240 watts 3120 Amperes 13 inf phase single and I need your help pricing it. It’s better than used condition but not new. I would say used 5 times total and has the stand, all working parts, etc. I have someone wanting to buy it, but I can’t find any information online to compare too. Please help your girl out!
  9. Hi all, I'm planning on building a hobby kiln for my partner, and am in the process of choosing refractory materials and kanthal wire for the heating element. Was hoping I could get some advice from anybody who knows about these things. I want the kiln to be light weight and very efficient. I'd like to use ceramic fibre board as an inner layer of insulation (rated to 1400 C / 2550 F), and calcium silicate board as a secondary layer (rated to 1000 C / 1830 F). The ceramic fibre board is very expensive compared to the calcium silicate board, but i can't only use the calcium silicate board as it's only rated to 1000 C / 1830 F. So my idea is to cement the two boards together, with the calcium silicate board on the outside, so that it won't exceed 1000 C / 1830 F. I'm wondering how thick the ceramic fibre board needs to be such that the calcium silicate doesn't reach that temperature. We'll be firing the kiln to about 1280 C / 2340 F. My other question is about kanthal wire for the heating elements. I'm wondering what gauge of wire I need. The kiln will be about 40 litres / 1.3 cubic feet. I want it to get up to 1280 C / 2340 F. Based on similar designs that I've seen online, it looks like I'd need it run at about 3600 watts. I'm wondering what gauge kanthal wire I should use for a well-insulated kiln that meets these specs. If anyone has any idea about either of these questions I'd really appreciate your thoughts! P.S. I'm aware of the health risks of working with fibreboard, and will be using the proper PPE and precautions.
  10. When I am firing my electric kiln, I start with the lid propped open about 2 inches and the top peephole out. Then at around 1000 degrees F I shut the lid. The top peephole is open the whole time. I understand that the lid needs to be propped to allow moisture and gasses to escape in the early stages of firing. My questions are: 1) is 1000F an appropriate temp to close the lid? 2) Is it necessary to prop the lid on a ^6 glaze firing as well as the bisque, or only during the bisque (^06) I have been firing this way for a couple years and the pots always come out well. However the lid has badly cracked on both the inside and outside, necessitating repair with kiln cement. I have a large electric Skutt Kiln (I think it's the 1227). Even with my repair, it is all fractured and occasionally falls onto the pots below. The metal handle is also badly rusted and corroded, an issue I didn't notice when I bought this kiln used a couple years ago. I notice when I close the lid on an 1000F kiln it makes a soft settling crackling noise. I am curious if the cracking lid is from thermal shock when it goes from hot room temp to 1000F. Because of this, i wonder if it's better not to close it so late (and hot) in the firing. Perhaps it's just time for an envirovent. Is it normal for a lid to start to deteriorate like this? The newer versions of my kiln are made with the hydraulic lid lifter, which I assume lifts it more evenly, without the torque from supporting it on just one part. Please let me know if anyone else has had this cracking lid issue. -Dana
  11. Hello, I finally feel comfortable with the number of tests I have run to share this information and make a definitive conclusion and recommendation. I have run 34 firing tests with burping and contrasted the results with 28 firings without burping. THIS IS ONLY A PROCESS FOR GLAZING. DOING THIS FOR BISQUE MAY CAUSE CRACKS. I HAVE NOT TESTED ON ONCE-FIRED WORK. Firstly, what do I mean when saying "burping kilns." The term comes from Raku (where I got started with pottery). Burping Raku is when you let oxygen into the container/ditch that you have your raku pieces sitting, many other potters, and I have found it to allow the glazes to become more active and colorful. However, that is not what I am referring to here. I am going to share with you my process to have your ceramics be more resistant to crawling. Process: Firstly, I do a slow ramp of my glaze loads (100-150 degrees/hour) to 250 degrees to allow for moisture to leave the pots. However, this is not a slow enough ramp and high enough temperature to completely rid your pieces of water and holding at such a low temperature adds unnecessary time to firings. So, every 150-200 degrees until about 700 degrees, I pop open the lid of my kiln for ten-fifteen seconds to allow for moisture to be released. Now, you are surely asking, "Why?" and "Will this damage my elements?" Why? - When I have burped the kiln, I have found glazes less likely to crawl. I also have found it less likely for the melt on glazes to be uneven. Will this damage your elements? - From what I have found, I have seen no stress on the elements. I have measured the time of firings and the life of the elements over two different sets, testing between burping and no burping. The process is incredibly easy- Know your ramp speeds, and calculate when your kiln will progress every 150 or 200 degrees, and go to your kiln with a pair of gloves and open the lid quickly. Do as many times as you would like until you hit 650/700 degrees. Anything over 700 will not work. (Little side note- If you wear glasses, take them off before doing this. It is incredibly foggy and can probably melt the plastic) Please try this on your own and let me know if you find this process to work for you and your glazes. To my knowledge, no one has written about this, and I have come up with this process myself. If this is a process that someone has written about, please let me know, for I do not want to take credit for something that isn't mine, even something as minuscule as opening the lid of your kiln.
  12. The kiln is giving me an E1 error. Can I fix this myself? How?
  13. Hi ! I am so glad I found this forum. I am trying to kick start a ceramic club. Here at our facility we have our Kiln room that is fully equipped, completed with endless amount of supplies. I really hit the mother load, however this room has not been utilized in ten(10) years or so. We have EVERYTHING, but nothing has an expiration date. I've been into ceramics since high school, unfortunately this is just something I am not familiar with. Most of our supplies are either Mayco or Duncan Bisque, I might call customer service to check with them about their under glazes, glazes, paints and such. But if you have any tips, advice on anything that might help. We have our kiln that is practically brand new it just needs love. Also does anyone know if porcelain or earthenware that has been here that long is still good to use and if so how to give it life. I know this is a lot, any help is welcomed thank you in advanced
  14. Hello, I just came upon a medium size kiln. It was free, came with no manual or use instructions. I am a first time kiln user so I don't want to do anything without more information on this specific kiln. It is a very old Aim Ceramic Kiln with a sitter, Model K-10. Is there anyone out there who can give me some advice on this particular kiln? Thank you
  15. Hey Ceramiacs I've been reading about the topic on the net, and it seems that there are very different opinions on subject. I was wondering if someone had a more scientific approach to the matter. Some say that you should open at 130F, and I think that is a little strange because that means that if you make a cup, you have to mind the temperature of you coffee, and other hot things you may consume of you pottery. If you open the kiln at 150f and hear crackling, isn't that a coincidence. I mean if the kiln are outside and it is freezing, I see how it might play a role. But it just seem strange that ceramics that reach red hot temperatures are sensitive too degrees that low . thanks,-] AC
  16. I have a standard old school Skutt with a kiln sitter but not really old, from about 2005 or so, just not computerized. It normally runs like a champ and no issues with the elements. I belong to a large co-op but probably do 10 or so loads at home so it doesn't get heavy use as I fire most of my work at the other studio. Of course I have a show this week-end and was ready to run one last load through since I sold quite a bit at my co-op sale. For the first time my kiln tripped the breaker when I turned it to high, but not right away, about a half hour in. This is after I had it on low for an hour vented and then on medium for at least another hour with no issues. When I ran it on high it tripped the breaker after about a half hour. I re-set it and tried again and had the same issue. I didn't want to keep trying as there must be a more serious issue though I can't understand what would be causing it to trip when the temperature goes up. Anyone have any ideas? I may have to call in someone to fix if I can't figure it out myself. Thanks
  17. Hello all! I currently have a Cress FX1814P manual kiln (with kiln sitter) that I have been using for about 10 years. I got it (very) used, since it's circa approximately 1978. I have had to replace a relay since I've had it, and the brick on the inside has a couple of chunks missing, but all in all it's been a really good little kiln. I have been contemplating purchasing a new kiln, and have narrowed it down to the Cress E1414 automatic kiln, due to it having the electronic readout. I am, however, having a tough time finding any reviews at all for either of them, and was wondering if anyone in this community has either of these models, specifically the E1414, and if it is worth purchasing a new one just for the automatic readout, when my old clunker seems to work just fine? Cheers! Pinky
  18. Hi! I plan to build a small gas kiln to start my first experiments in ceramics. I researched a bit, flipped through some books, and it seemed accessible to me to build a little double crossdraft kiln. This model of kiln, known in Japanese as itte-koi-gama (いってこい窯) , is popular as a wood kiln (the Phoenix kiln or Philosopher’s Kiln) but little used on gas. It looks like a plan for a small gas kiln was published on Building Your Own Kiln, Three Japanese Potters Give Advice And Instructions , but I didn't have access to this book. So looking at some kilns over the internet (1, 2, 3, 4, 5) I made a plan for a kiln to firing in cone 10 for two 12X12 inch kiln shelves, the chamber is 3,1 ft³. I wonder if anyone has ever had contact with such a gas kiln. My main question is about the size of the chimney. The models I saw didn't have a big chimney, which leaves me wondering about Fred Olsen's rule. What do you think? I was thinking of building a five-foot chimney. The input size corresponds to the output size and the size of the chimney tunnel. Is it better or safer to have a wider chimney or not? Any comments that might help me in this kiln are welcome, thanks!
  19. Hi Everyone, I remember reading something several years ago about the possibility of a kiln off-gassing and permanently fogging up windows in the building. I am hoping to get my first kiln late this summer or early this fall. Because of what I read years ago, I was going to build a separate 10 x 10 kiln shed. But, I notice from other forum posts that many of you have your kilns in the garage. We have a large 3 car garage and I could easily wall off a section for the kiln if I don’t have to worry about the kiln messing up the cars. What are the risks of having a kiln in the garage with cars? It will be electric and will be vented to the outside. Thanks, Shannon
  20. Since day 1 I wanted to do wood firing. I started with an electric kiln and although it is possible to do interesting things I'm still focused on ultimately doing Anagama. I cant truly test Cone 10 glazes in my electric and want to get as close to possible to that environment, which means a way to do reduction, neutral and oxidation. So I got a broke down Duncan kiln donated to me and the burner came in today so I'm super excited!!! Stripping it down tonight and getting the elements out then will figure out how to cut the burner port and the top opening. Then I have to find a 40 - 50 gallon tank. Gaaaaaaah excited! df
  21. Our college was gifted a Siegy front-loading gas kiln [Model No. unlisted] in which we are hoping to refurbish. We are in search of a hard copy or digital PDF of the operation manual, as we have been unable to locate one via Siegy Kilns & Equip. or online. Any help to get this kiln operational would be greatly appreciated! Thank you
  22. What is the highest cone temp you have reached in your Raku kiln- ill be using Propane for the fuel source.
  23. Hi guys , We are INSULATORS manufacturer HOLLOW INSULATORS have these problems of ID OVERFIRED problem rest of all material is OK If we talk abouts shed(which is thin portion of INSULATORS ) is OK stem is OK but in ID facing OVERFIRED problem Top portion of ID approx..300mm is OK Bottom portion of ID approx ..300mm is OK But middle portion of ID which is 500-600mm is OVERFIRED How can be short out this problem If we talk about other material like bushing is OK in same kiln Note:- HOLLOW ITEM FIRED IS BOTH HANG AND WITHOUT HANG BUT FACING PROBLEM CONSISTENT ... Please suggest new firing technics What are change required in kiln schedule or state of firing Regards VIKASH BHAGAT
  24. I am thinking of opening a members only clay studio, as all of them in my area have long waitlists and the demand is there. I haven’t found any recent threads on the operations costs or best practices associated with running a studio. Can anyone help me out by providing hard expenses associated with and any tips for this business? Thanks in advance for your help!
  25. I'm moving from a community studio to a studio in my garage and I'm planning on purchasing a large kiln, however I bought a small used Skutt 614 (it's tiny) off craigslist so that I could gain some experience with kilns before making the leap to an expensive larger kiln. My problem - once I got this used little Skutt home I see that the previous owner had twisted one of the electric prongs on the plugs to make it a 110v. Tt looks like the plug is compatible with 115v.) It appears that they twisted one of the prongs 90 degrees. I've been speaking to electricians about rewiring this little kiln, but I'm wondering if I could just twist the prong back to the original 115v position and then use a proper adapter from the hardware store rather than replacing the full plug/cord. Another option is to not bother and cut my loses. The kiln cost me $100, and ultimately will be too small for what I need. But it appears to be in good shape visually otherwise. I have not plugged it in. thanks in advance! Karen
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