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Found 11 results

  1. Hey all, using white cone 6 stoneware- B-mix 5 WC-401 I have been making some little 8-inch coral wall hangings- I throw bowled plates and fill it in with coral looking bits. They dry slowly and they usually make it through the glaze firing fine but then I like to add some glass (I bought some stained glass and mosaic glass pebbles- photos attached (the ones I bought are different colors but same type)) and put them in for another glaze firing and then they often crack at this step. I try not to use too much glass since I know that can cause cracking and often they just crack a little bit in the back but sometimes it goes all the way through (photos attached since Im not good at describing this) I have 2 questions: 1- after they're bisqued, can I put the glaze on them, let it dry and then put the glass on top so that I just do one glaze firing or is there any cost/benefit to doing it separately? - I did it separately this time because I decided I didnt like how they looked just with the glaze. 2- I've heard you can put sand underneath pieces to be like a shrink slab but I fire in a community kiln and they dont seem to be open to that; would making little clay coils or rolling out cylindrical strips and putting them under the corals when I do the glass melting help to prevent cracking? -I figured they were cracking because of friction getting caught on the kiln shelf any other thoughts/suggestions on how to do these? I just made a few more and trimmed the back of the bowled plates to add a little foot thinking that might help since there will be less surface area touching the kiln shelf but they are still drying thanks!
  2. Handbuilding Laboratory There are two distinct stages to acquiring technique: The first is to learn it, the second is to forget it. We will review of the basics of hand built ceramics then blur the lines. Emphasis will be placed on gaining a deeper understanding of the clay itself, establishing a paradigm of creative problem solving and developing a personal set of integrated methods that accomplishes our artistic goals. ALL LEVELS Session runs August 1 – 5, 2018 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. daily, open studio hours on select days. $470 tuition + $35 registration fee Artist Bio: ERIC KNOCHE creates work that is an exploration of the underlying cadences and postulates of his own life and the layers of culture that surround him. The objects he creates are distillations of fundamental movements of energy into static three dimensional forms. When he makes work, he often feels as though he is excavating his own subconscious. He has been strongly influenced by languages he doesn’t understand and tools he doesn’t know how to use, male and female figures, machine parts, shelters, math equations, micro-facial movements, the argentine tango, alphabets, the spine and other bones, the distortional nature of memory, the limits of ocular perception, plants, running water, and songbirds. www.ericknoche.com $505
  3. From the album: Curves and Crisp Edges

    Slab construction, stoneware with a crackle celadon glaze.
  4. From the album: Curves and Crisp Edges

    Slab construction, stoneware with terra sigilata
  5. Guest

    Burnish Gold Luster Mug

    From the album: John Baymore's Clay Work

    This cup is in the invitational exhibition "I'll Drink To That" at the Eclipse Mill Gallery in North Adams, MA until August 27th, 2017. Handbuilt, woodfired, American Shino, overglaze enamel, gold luster.

    © 2017 - John Baymore - all rights reserved

  6. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    A small set of hand-built mugs (slab construction) with wheel-thrown rims for family friends...both of whom are musically gifted. The orange has a look of atmospheric firing, but it is actually Amaco Velvet orange underglaze. The sheen over the underglaze is from a light coating of clear. The interior and rim were dipped in Woo's Blue. The details on the piano keys are brushed on. All of the rest of the glazing was sprayed. These are 12oz (.35ml) and stand approximately 5in. (12.7cm) tall. These were fired to Cone 10 in reduction.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA All rights reserved.

  7. From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is a sculptural teapot by Helene Fielder. I had the pleasure of meeting her at the Tennessee Craft fair in Nashville over the weekend. This is NOT my work but is part of a community discussion forum. To see more of Helene's amazing work, go here: http://potterybyhelene.com/

    © Copyright Helene Fielder

  8. From the album: CLAY TO SHARE

    Crescent rattle hand formed and adorned with handmade ceramic clay beads and a found wood handle.

    © BHClaysmith

  9. Kye

    Handbuilt birds

    From the album: Early work

    My first hand building. Trying to figure out how to glaze fire them without sticking.
  10. From the album: Susie2014

    Handbuilt lidded pot, fired to cone 5.
  11. Hi everyone! I'm new here, and new to ceramics. I will be hand building miniatures. My main question right now is, how can you tell when the clay pieces are dry? I've searched online, and the only answer I have found is that they are dry when they no longer feel cold when touched against your face/wrist. I have created some pieces to test my clay samples (various types of stoneware and porcelain clay). After 3 weeks, they still feel fairly cold on my face. They are about 1/2" thick, and I realize that drying will take longer with this thickness. But, it seems like they have felt the same (against my face/wrist) for the last 3 days now, and I'm wondering if dry clay still feels slightly cold? Is there another method to check when they are dry enough for the bisque firing? Thanks for any advice! Melissa
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