Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Electric kilns'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Terms of Use
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest
    • Community Marketplace – Buy/Sell/Trade/Free

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 2 results

  1. I have a new-ish L&L E23T kiln with 3" brick; one of the reasons I chose it was its ability to fire to cone 10. Now it seems that I might want to actually start to do that once in a while—I will mostly use it for bisque and cone 5/6. The motivation to do this is that since I left my last membership studio, I had a small load of cone 10 work gas fired at a friends studio, where I can also use her glazes. Despite the very reasonable $.05 per cu. inch cost, this load cost me $72—more than what two full kiln loads would cost in my electric kiln, and almost double what the friend said it cost in gas for one firing in her kiln! Obviously, that is not sustainable. I know I can't achieve the things I could with cone 10 reduction, but I will limit the firings to what will be happy in oxidation—matte and gloss white, matte black, crawl glaze, and Heino and/or Laguna turquoise. Any advice or words of wisdom about cone 10 electric firing? I'm very new to doing my own firing. I've included a pic of the spectacular Heino glaze from that last gas firing mentioned above; if I could anything close to this in electric oxidation I'd be a very happy potter!
  2. Ever wonder how much it costs to fire your electric kiln? It is probably less expensive than you think. Check out the New Potter's Page on the Skutt website for a formula and "fudge factor" description. http://skutt.com/potter/faqs/
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.