Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Advice'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Terms of Use
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest
    • Community Marketplace – Buy/Sell/Trade/Free

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 13 results

  1. Hi All, writing as an American from East Coast but living in Denmark. I am in need of a new kiln after buying 2 used that I couldn't get working properly (I live on an island with only 6,000 people - none knowledgeable about kiln tech/specs/operation/parts etc. and my husband and I are useless for various reasons. I will sell the 2 to people off the island and get back some money). In Denmark there is one manufacturer of kilns and, as such, they get hefty prices for quality I'm not so sure about. Before, I buy, I'd love to hear anyone's recommendations, experience or knowledge of qualities/reliability/durability of kilns in EU (some being sold in the U.S. as well)? (Rhode, Nabertherm, Paragon, Olympic, Cromartie, Potterycrafts, possibly Skutt- many others made in the UK)? I would absolutely be buying an L&L in the U.S. if I were there (and couldn't join a shared studio). Rhode and Nabertherm are closest to where I live in Denmark. L&L does not have a supplier in EU, though I do have one on the East Coast who will ship to me - so I am considering that too. I know though that customs duties will be outrageous, and tax will include the duties and shipping costs plus price and tax the whole amount at 25%! All those I can find in EU will require shipping to where I live so would consider the right kiln from UK or other EU countries. Any ideas - they will be highly appreciated! THANKS in advance
  2. Hey happy to have found this group, looking for beginner info on using a electric kiln. Norman kiln. I know they are out of business and can be serviced. Looking for instructions on first time use, what to place it on top of? What to test with and operating info.. any advice welcome
  3. Hi all, I am trying to buy a versatile kiln for small projects at home, and the roderveld pyramid kiln with the gas and wood firing bases seems like a good choice for bisque, raku and stoneware glaze firing with the versatility to give me a variety of effects. The only problem is that I can't find any references from anyone who has ever used one, and it's a load of money to spend on something without having any idea whether it will do all the things I want (basically I don't have unlimited space so I want a kiln that can do as much as possible, I want to try a variety of techniques, and I don't really want to fire an electric kiln). Can anyone tell me if they have used one and if it's a good piece of kit? Thanks
  4. hello all hope everyone is safe and doing well in these difficult times! i have just joined this community and was hoping you all would be able to help me out. i normally throw on a wheel (where i go take classes) and have been doing so for about a year. i signed up for a membership at a pottery studio because i would love to pursue a career in ceramics. and then this quarantine happened. Sooo, i was maybe hoping to order some clay online and coil build some dinnerware or hand build random figurines. -Do i need a wedging table in order to do this? - how would i go about recycling my clay, should i just dump everything and let it dry out? i am unsure of how to upkeep and maintain things due to the fact i took classes and the teacher would handle all of the hands on stuff. any tips and advice on how i should go about all this would be immensely helpful! thanks in advance :))
  5. Hello, I have a figurative sculpture piece in a cone 5 white stoneware that I made poor Iron Oxide choice on. I put a fairly light Iron Oxide wash on over the entire thing as bisqueware, then fired it to cone 5. I'm O.K. ( or fatalistic) with about 90% of the surface, but the region of the head, which is a distinct area, is bothering me. There are some medals on the figures chest and i ran some super fine sandpaper over one and some of the oxide came up, the sanded area looks white. However that surface is closer to a burnished surface then the face is (I think) - so maybe the face absorbed more Iron Oxide? So I was thinking if I could sand off the face and... I don't know, some white glaze, or even try to underglaze and re-fire? My problems are a) I don't know how deeply Iron Oxide permeates a bisqueware piece, and b) I don't know when to stop messing with something. It may be I should just leave well enough alone. Just tried to put an image up but I'm not sure how to have a URL for an image, my carbonmade account isn't helping. Anyway, any sage advice would be appreciated .
  6. I took ceramic classes in college and loved it. I quickly became good on the wheel and that is my primary focus, however I also sculpt. I had the pleasure of working with multiple different clays. I primarily used stoneware and porcelain but occasionally earthenware as well. The stoneware I fired at cone 10 and 6 and porcelain at cone 10. I would consider myself a beginner as far as mixing the clays because I never had to do it and all the clay was made for us. I would like to mix my own clay bodies at home because I assume it’s cheaper than buying pre-made clay and I also will have more control with my preferences. I really liked stoneware and porcelain and wondered if anyone had any good recipes to share and advice to get me started. Like I said I mostly do wheel throwing (mugs, plates, bowls, teapots, etc.) I have the capabilities to fire up to cone 10. Thanks to everyone in advance!!
  7. Hi, so I am new at this and asking for help. I had fired my clay, and painted it (with regular paint, ceramics friendly) and then put a glaze over top. The glaze said it could be used over paint and that it should be clear after firing. After firing the glazed pieces, it seems that the paint has been stripped off and the glaze never went clear. Did I do something wrong? My kiln is a cone 8, bought barely used. I followed the instructions on the side and the internet: Cook on low for 1 hr., medium for 2 hrs., and (after looking it up) another hour on low. Also, is there any way I can fix the pieces? They were gifts and took me a while to make them, but I know they're likely ruined. I appreciate any advice and help.
  8. I'd like to up my game and break into "making more than the cost of the table", so I'm here for some advice. I've signed up for the application to a few small holiday fairs, and as a ceramic student I've got maybe $100 if I can get someone to loan me some money. I've been doing my school's "get rid of it before you go home" fair for a few years, but I haven't done anything at those other than put the stuff on the table and say hi to everyone who passes. Questions What kind of work sells well? What kind of setup can I throw together in 3 weeks? I've got some "eh it'll do" work (last year) and some "hey that's good!" (this year). Pricing advice? the fairs are at my school and a coffee shop, I’m not expecting big spenders, just your general artsy holiday crowd. studio turn around is about two weeks from bone dry to glaze fire, so small and quick is good. supplies I have freebie card reader from Paypal sign saying I have said card reader and can take X card car (SUV and I can fold the back seats down) old work that isn't terrible (images on request) one of those utility shopping carts Permission to use school materials (glazes etc) as long as I’m not working on “to sell” work during class (private studio time is fine. “Make More Work!” Is the school motto) stuff I can beg/borrow my dad who has a wood shop and is willing to help me make things if they aren't very complicated (my skill level, not his.) Possibly an assistant (my brother. Not lots of help, but some.) Maybe stuff from the house if I can promise to bring it back in one piece. limits the fairs I signed up for sell 4 foot and 8 foot tables. no booths here. I’m moving next year to a masters program, and I’m not sure they have a ceramic studio near there (I'll look but I'm not hopeful). I'd rather not make anything huge and/or costly and then have to store it in the meantime. thank you in advance for your time and help.
  9. OK, I've read most of the pugmill/mixer comments on why get one (or not), what size, and uses. I am retired, am not a production potter, and could do without a pugmill/mixer (at least until my hand/arm strength begins to fade). But, at my stage in life, I enjoy using fine equipment in my hobbies and would like to get a small to medium pugmill - not necessarily the smallest size. Now - I need to decide on the manufacturer - Bailey vs Peter Pugger. I know both manufacturers make good equipment but would appreciate hearing pros and cons on these two manufacturers including features, cost, and customer service. Comments from long time owners and recent purchasers would be greatly appreciated!
  10. I am a hobbyist and I throw at my universities ceramic studio. I have a really hard time drying things right. I go on Tuesdays and Thursdays at noon. If I throw something on Tuesday, I cant get it to dry properly by Thursday. If I put a plastic bag over it it is still far too wet to trim on Thursday and if I leave it completely bare it gets to bone dry. I cant figure out what to do differently. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
  11. I live in southwest Florida and have about 4 gallon bags of coral that I've picked up on the beach and I've been trying to find an a project to use it in. I thought making some jewelry out of it would be fun, but I wanted to know if anyone on here has ever tried firing coral before? Let alone glazing it. I know thin shells tend to crumble and turn to dust in a kiln, but this beach coral feels a lot tougher than your average shell. Anybody have any thoughts on this?
  12. Hello! I am a high school student who is interested in creating a studio at home. I would like to try and build a kiln outside for raku pottery, but am also interested in buying a kiln for regular ceramic use. I would really appreciate any help i can get in order to find the supplies i need (kiln, potters wheel, glazes, tools, etc.) I've taken a few ceramic classes at school so i am not totally clueless, but would really appreciate knowledge from those who are more experienced.
  13. Hey Everyone, I just started a little studio in my garage and figured I would reach out to the community for some advice. I plan on barrel firing my pieces to cut down on my costs but I've never done it before and have some questions. I bought a 31 gallon galvanized steel trash can and am wondering If I have to burn the zinc off before using it for a firing? I read online that this is the case but I was thinking that maybe the fumes from the zinc burning off would impart some color on the pots. Also I'm wondering what types of clay people are using for barrel firings? The guy at the pottery store told me low fire white clay but the internet seems to think I should be using groggy stoneware. Hopefully someone knows about this stuff but please feel free to post any other advice you have on this type of firing, I'll be grateful for any help I can get. Thanks
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.