Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'stoneware'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Ceramic Arts Daily Forums
    • Forum FAQ & Terms of Use
    • Studio Operations and Making Work
    • Clay and Glaze Chemistry
    • Equipment Use and Repair
    • Business, Marketing, and Accounting
    • Educational Approaches and Resources
    • Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy
    • Int'l Ceramic Artists Network (ICAN) Operations and Benefits
    • Ceramic Events of Interest
    • Community Marketplace – Buy/Sell/Trade/Free

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 166 results

  1. Hi all, Standing in a thrift shop staring at a pile of white hotel/commercial tableware and thinking of Duchamp. Makers marks showed predominantly porcelain from England, Australia, Japan, German, India, some European, a squillion Chinese.....and some completely unbranded ones amoung the makes. Some 'new' bonechina (Chinese or Thai I would think) and a smattering of earthenware. Usually in industry bonechina is high bisque/ low glaze fired, porcelain high fired and earthenware low fired....but are they??? Bought 6 dinnerplates reglazed 2 in a commercial e/w glaze as the first test pieces, fired to ^03, opened the kiln this morning........and found they were truly ghastly!! Has anyone tried this 'ready mades' approach before and could give me their expert success tips before I deface the other 4 'victims'? ta, Irene
  2. From the album: Vases

    Dark vase 40 cm x 28 cm

    © Photo only: do what ever you want but you must include the link to www.oostuudio.ee

  3. From the album: Vases

    White vase, 40.5 x 35.5 cm

    © Phooto only: Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

  4. From the album: Vases

    White vase, 40.5 x 35.5 cm

    © Photo only: do what ever you want but you must include the link to www.oostuudio.ee

  5. From the album: Vases

    Dark vase 40 cm x 28 cm

    © Photo only: do what ever you want but you must include the link to www.oostuudio.ee

  6. I am just getting back into clay after a long hiatus due to lack of studio space and other responsibilities. In the past I have usually known other potters where I could get some leads on good clays and glazes and check out some samples. I don't know any potters where I live and have had to rely on manufacturers write ups and test tiles at a supplier. At the clay store everyone says "you'll have to test it". Well, that's for sure but without a glaze studio I have accumulated some clays and glazes that are not working the way I hoped. I am hoping I can shorten the learning curve with some advice from those who have used Western clays. I do smaller scale hand-building: a good cone 5/6 porcelain and a white stoneware with a bit more strength (really fine sand or grog only) would both be desirable (no wheel work). So far I have had a lot of glaze fitting issues with the bodies I have tried (some success with clear glaze on porcelain, but success with a celadon type glaze is on my wish list) My location is Arizona so I would probably be looking at California manufacturers. I am considering a couple of Aardvark clays for my next clay trials (Nara 5 and BeeMix with sand), any comments on those? I do both slab construction and pinching and like a smooth body. I prefer white bodies so that I lessen the chances of contaminating porcelain with another color and I also plan to use body stains in porcelain. Firing is electric oxidation. Just to eliminate a few questions: I have already tried to fine tune bisque firing and I don't think it is the problem. I have called the clay manufacturer and spoke to a tech guy there, and I also talked to a guy in the back at the clay store. In the end I got honest comments about both clays I have been using that lead me to think they are less than ideal for my purposes and one is particularly difficult to get a good glaze fit under any circumstances. So I am back to looking at trying other clay bodies and hope that I can stick with one manufacturer to help with shipping. With any luck I might even find that some of the glazes I have already purchased might fit better on another clay. It isn't practical for me to start up a glaze studio right now so I would probably do best to find commercial glazes but would use glazemixer.com for a proven winner. I would be grateful for any suggestions since my time is limited and I want to reduce stress in my life by having more fun with clay and enjoying the end result. As you might imagine, this is my first post.
  7. From the album: What I am up to

    A close up from above
  8. From the album: What I am up to

    A slightly better angle
  9. From the album: What I am up to

    The finished product glazed and fired to cone 6
  10. We just tried to fire a newly bought glaze that required 1160 degrees on stoneware that is labelled 1100 - 1280 degrees. The kiln was opened at around 250 which we have done many times in the past. However, this time we heard several pinging sounds from the largest stoneware piece, so we immediately closed it until it got under 200. Then we propped open the lid with a brick until it got down to 100. All the time we heard the pinging sounds. At around 70 we removed all pieces and they were fine, except the largest one that kept "pinging" away. So we wrapped it up in a large piece of cloth and kept it like that overnight. Today, almost 24 hours after it has gotten down to room temperature, it still "pings"! Some bone china pieces did spontaneously shatter with a glaze from the same manufacturer, but that happened within minutes of them becoming room temp. This large piece has lasted way longer now. On another forum someone said we should tap it and see if it rings out like a bell or if it only produces a dull noise, which means it's internally cracked, but it does ring out like a bell still. We've heard that the glaze apparently isn't compatible with the stoneware, but does anyone know what we can expect? Will it spontaneously shatter a week from now, a month, a year? EDIT: WRONG FORUM! My mistake. Can a moderator please move this to the "in the studio" forum? Thank you!
  11. Hi everyone! I'm new here, and new to ceramics. I will be hand building miniatures. My main question right now is, how can you tell when the clay pieces are dry? I've searched online, and the only answer I have found is that they are dry when they no longer feel cold when touched against your face/wrist. I have created some pieces to test my clay samples (various types of stoneware and porcelain clay). After 3 weeks, they still feel fairly cold on my face. They are about 1/2" thick, and I realize that drying will take longer with this thickness. But, it seems like they have felt the same (against my face/wrist) for the last 3 days now, and I'm wondering if dry clay still feels slightly cold? Is there another method to check when they are dry enough for the bisque firing? Thanks for any advice! Melissa
  12. Hello My company is sited in Valencia (Spain) and we produce ceramic clays for casting or ready to use for throwing. We produce stonaware, red clay, earthenware... I would like to know from where you get the clays, and I would like to know if it´s possible any collaboration relationship with any of these potters shops or factories. Thanks very much VICAR www.vicar-sa.es Facebook: VICAR Cerámica www.facebook.com/pages/VICAR-Cerámica/173474149476721 http://vicar-sa.es/
  13. Hello there, Im not a ceramicist (Im learning little bits here, doing workshops there...), Im an illustrative designer, but I would like to create decals of my designs and put them onto dinnerware. I was hoping someone out there could give me a bit of information....I have a few questions. First: I would like my designs to be transfered onto stoneware or porcelain. As far as I can tell there is no issue with that? My designs have very fine line detail, so I feel that an onglaze digital decal (as opposed to a tissue transfer, or screenprint) would probably ensure a sharp image. However, these decals can often look raised or "stuck on"...Im trying to avoid that. I have seen coloured digital decals that dont have that raised effect...so how is that achieved? Do they apply the digital decal on bisque....then fire, then clear glaze, then fire again? Or can you apply the decal, just wait for it to dry then glaze and fire? would that affect the vibrancy of the colours printed, as I understand with digital systems you can have the whole cmyk gamut? I understand there is an entire science behind the make up of clay, glazes and firing. If I wanted to apply a digital decal to bisqued stoneware for example, would it have to be a decal especially for stoneware? Additionally, I was interested to know how difficult/easy it may be applying a seamless design to the inside of a bowl or curved surface? I imagine that you would have to follow maybe a cone shaped template, so it can be applied? Second: Being dinnerware, I would like the decals to be food safe. Even if the decal manufacturer claims it is food safe, are there other factors that could cause problems? for example the type of kiln you use, or other things that may be in the kiln while your firing? Is it expensive to test? Lastly, and thank you so much for you time, As far as producing my dinnerware, I have found plenty of businesses that will custom make digital decals. but Im finding it difficult to find any that will make AND apply the decal to your piece...even though I know they are out there. Iam in Australia, which doesnt host such industry, but if anyone has any leads on any smaller run manufacturers or business (closer to me the better, naturally) That would be appreciated... maybe also because Im new at this, Im not quite sure how to search for this type of business, so any resources or "buzz words" that might help me would be great. Any info at all would be appreciated and helpful. Thanks a lot. J.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.