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Found 166 results

  1. Hey guys and gals. I'm working on a white locally produced commercial claybody which is my favorite at the moment. I have 200 lbs of it to work through. It is only very lightly grogged. I am going to be doing some more testing with my own locally sourced lake clay but in the meantime I want to give this clay some more bite to it. Rather than grog, can I use silica sand or regular stream sand or something? I like the Korean's texture of the Maksabal which has just enough texture because they are using indigenous clay which is filled with impurities and is sieved leaving behind some of the bigger textured bits. Oh forgot to add that I am firing to cone 6 in oxidation.
  2. From the album: Some work

    Thrown. Brushed sodium silicate on surface then dried with a heat gun. Just the top where the sodium silicate is. Then taken off the wheel and carefully stretched and altered.
  3. From the album: MOAR STUFFS

    This was a piece I did in college--I sure miss midrange firing. Sadly, the postal worker who delivered this big bowl to the lady who ordered it from me just slammed the box it was in on her cement porch, and my beautiful work broke in three pieces. :'( GAH... Fired to ^6 in a Skutt electric. White stoneware.

    © The Earthen Cavy/Sarah Alderete

  4. Hi all, this forum has been a treasure trove of information while I was learning and exploring techniques, I hope you can help me with a specific question. I like the look of unglazed clay when it has been fired at ^10. Red clays, black clays, off white clays… I like to play with the contrast of glazed and unglazed fired clay. One thing I would like to try, is to give color to the unglazed areas of my work, sort of like the pitcher pic I attached below. This is not exactly what I'm going for, though, but close. Here I assume the pattern on the unglazed clay is iron oxide applied along with the glaze and high-fired at the same time. Perhaps the tumblers I attached are like a better example of what I'm talking about, you can see she dipped the rim in white glaze and painted the rest with bright stripes, I'm puzzled as to how/what steps/what with. What I'd like to do is work in two steps. First I'd glaze the pot & fire it, and then I'd apply vivid colors to the unglazed parts, leaving the glazed part alone, and fire the ware again, at a lower temperature (lower^ is how I understand I will get the brightest colors). So my question is : What kind of color (overglaze/underglaze/stains..) would a) adhere to mature unglazed stoneware, and become permanent during firing ? This is not for the interior of dinnerware, but possibly destined to items that would get handled a lot. I guess another question would be : Am I approaching this wrong and should I consider another process? Thank you for any insight you may have on this, D. The photos are of work by Ako Castuera and Shino Takeda
  5. LeeU

    Dust

    From the album: LeeU 12-15 Cut and Ripped Slab Pieces

    Table piece embellished with beads, jewelry findings, and micro-dust glitter.

    © Lee Ustinich-Two Steps Forward

  6. LeeU

    Foundation foot

    From the album: LeeU 12-15 Cut and Ripped Slab Pieces

    Embellished with plastic mesh grid and bead.
  7. LeeU

    Foundation

    From the album: LeeU 12-15 Cut and Ripped Slab Pieces

    Table piece with single edge of micro-dust glitter.
  8. LeeU

    Wave

    From the album: LeeU 12-15 Cut and Ripped Slab Pieces

    Table piece embellished with two beads.
  9. Hi there, I'm a figure sculptor working in clay and firing to around cone 06. I'm getting ready to order a new batch of clay and am having some difficulty in understanding the differences between earthenware and stoneware bodies when firing to 06 (such that neither one will be vitrified). I'm interested both in the differences in the raw state (i.e. plasticity, wet-to-dry shrinkage, etc) but also the differences when firing (strength, resistance to thermal shock, ability to tolerate thick sections) -- in all of these I mean the difference independent of any grog/silica-sand added. I'm confused because from my research Earthenware seems to be defined purely by the act of low-firing, for example here's the definition I see often: "Earthenware is the term for pottery that has not been fired to the point of vitrification and is thus porous." Based on this definition an "earthenware" body that is pushed to 02 and vitrified is no longer earthenware and a "stoneware" body which is fired to only 06 and not vitrified would now be called earthenware. Am I the only one that finds this sort of definition, well, sort of useless? What I would like to know is what are the intrinsic differences between these two bodies when BOTH are fired to the same non-vitrified state at the same cone. So, what are the real differences in terms of: 1.) Working properties like plasticity 2.) General rules about shrinkage, strength, thermal shock, etc. 3.) Final strength, texture, etc. (please clarify if you use the word maturity to describe the differences, too, since that seems to be defined in a rather circular way too roughly as "when a clay gains the properties you want it to have")
  10. Greetings, I am an adviser to the Theta's, and I want them to do an art project. I saw a really neat utube on how to imprint on ceramic (and even bought the special ink-jet water decal paper to make our logos). Now I was pricing ceramic plates and they are exorbitant. At least it is when I need 40 plates. But, I saw a sale on white stoneware plates. Can I use stoneware instead of ceramic? Basically, you transfer the logo onto the plate and then bake it in the oven for anywhere from 10 to 30 minutes (directions vary). So... an I substitute stoneware plates (cheaper) for ceramic?
  11. Hi, I have recently been experimenting with converting a few of my production pieces to slip cast pieces. I took a Hiroe Hanazono workshop at Arrowmont, ( excellent BTW ) and learned the basics of slip casting. Since then I've made molds of my pieces and have cast several of them. Everything is going swimmingly except... My work is all in a red clay, I use RedRock from Highwater, fire it to a hot 5 / cool 6, I have made a slip from RedRock by drying then adding 40% water and .3% Darvan 811. The problem that I'm getting is that my slip keeps gelling up. I've already got over the maximum amount of deflocculant in it, and have had to add water anyway bringing my specific gravity down to 1.6 instead of the desired 1.75. It's working, but still gelling, I assume from the Iron in the clay. Does anyone have a good cone5/6 red slip for slip casting recipe? I don't mind if it is speckled or not, and it doesn't have to match red rock exactly, just be red. I appreciate any input ! Thanks
  12. Hello, I am curious about the incorporation of metals into ceramic sculpture for aesthetic reasons. At my university we use mostly stoneware (although we can make or buy our own clay bodies) and the ^10 is the normal firing temp although we can independently fire at lower cones. To use metals with the sculpture they must obviously be bisque fired together- as they will be apart of the clay (there will be obvious shrinkage but I plan to accommodate that) I guess my question is, if I were to use stoneware (for sculpture) and fire at a lower temp say... Bisque at 06 and fire at ^5 - ^6 up to the melting point of the metal used ... Would it make the sculpture super fragile considering the stoneware wasn't fired to it's fully matured temp... Any suggestions on a hardy low fire (^5 -6) clay body, or what metal should be used... What all metals CAN be used? I am curious about bronze (which would have to be fired at an even lower temp) or maybe just tiny scraps of steel... These metal pieces will be small decorations protruding out from the sculpture- and I'm not even sure if this is possible, I'm somewhat inexperienced, but if anyone has any info I would GREATLY appreciate it! Thank you! -June
  13. From the album: LaserJet Decals

    The tree images on these Cityscape bottles are what the HP Laserjet decals look like once they are fired to cone 6 (oxidation). The slide-off decal paper came from: Decal Paper, 12610 NW 1115th Ave. - Bldg 200, Medley Florida 33178. The printer that I used is an old HP LaserJet4000TN...ink from this printer includes enough iron that it fires very well onto previously glazed surfaces.
  14. From the album: LaserJet Decals

    The tree images on these Cityscape bottles are what the HP Laserjet decals look like after the decals are printed, cut out, soaked (briefly), and slid onto the previously glazed surface. At this point in th eprocess, the images are black. The slide-off decal paper came from: Decal Paper, 12610 NW 1115th Ave. - Bldg 200, Medley Florida 33178. The printer that I used is an old HP LaserJet4000TN...ink from this printer includes enough iron that it fires very well onto previously glazed surfaces.
  15. From the album: Marian65's Album 1

    Brown cone 6 stoneware clay, glazed inside, iron oxide outside.
  16. Has anyone attempted to use natural iron pyrite in a clear base glaze to a mid to high fire on stoneware? I would like to use iron pyrite collected directly from area streams which may contain minute amounts of gold or silver. I would like to avoid having to completely reinvent the wheel. I have a propane updraft kiln. Any advice or educated guesses are welcome.
  17. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on.
  18. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on. These are stained then dip glazed into Woo's Blue and Honey Lustre, fired to Cone 10 reduction.
  19. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on. These are stained then dip glazed into Honey Lustre and St. John's Black, fired to Cone 10 reduction.
  20. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Stoneware mugs, approximately 5" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into a house shaped slab-add-on. These are stained then dip glazed into Ohata Kaki and Mac Celedon, fired to Cone 10 reduction.
  21. From the album: Hope House International Fundraiser

    Wheel-thrown, stoneware containers, approximately 12"-14" tall with the Hope House International logo stamped into the slab built handle on the lid. High-fired, Cone 10 with stain and Woo's Blue sprayed on exterior. Interior is glazed with Ohata Kaki.
  22. Hi All, I'm trying to estimate how much slip I need to buy or make in order to create 120 pieces of a 64 oz. vessel from slip-casting. I would like to hopefully cast them 3/8" thick. Thanks for all your help! -Russell
  23. I am looking for a good "dark" grey glaze I can fire in oxidation on light stoneware clay. We wire around 1249C (cone 9) This the tone (or shade) of grey I am looking for (forget it's b&w image): Do you have any good recipes? I am thinking about experimenting with white satin glaze I have and adding some black stain I got (Co-Fe-Cr). Am I even on the right track?
  24. Hi all, Standing in a thrift shop staring at a pile of white hotel/commercial tableware and thinking of Duchamp. Makers marks showed predominantly porcelain from England, Australia, Japan, German, India, some European, a squillion Chinese.....and some completely unbranded ones amoung the makes. Some 'new' bonechina (Chinese or Thai I would think) and a smattering of earthenware. Usually in industry bonechina is high bisque/ low glaze fired, porcelain high fired and earthenware low fired....but are they??? Bought 6 dinnerplates reglazed 2 in a commercial e/w glaze as the first test pieces, fired to ^03, opened the kiln this morning........and found they were truly ghastly!! Has anyone tried this 'ready mades' approach before and could give me their expert success tips before I deface the other 4 'victims'? ta, Irene
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