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Found 166 results

  1. Hello! This may be a question that's a little silly, but I can't seem to find the answer anywhere. I've taken a liking to brushing on glazes on a banding wheel, as I've used earthenware clay/glazes for the majority of my time making pottery, and just recently decided to try a few different clay bodies and still intend to use brush-ons as much as I can. My question comes from the level of difficulty brushing 3 coats onto Cone 6 stoneware or porcelain (that has been fired and matured to Cone 6) brings, as It's not porous and takes a while for each coat to fully dry. As I've been looking at some different company glazes/glaze combinations and techniques (specifically Mayco), a lot of them have said to bisque fire to Cone 04, and then glaze fire to Cone 6 and it makes sense to me, but I still can't find it written anywhere definitively that that is the way to go about brushing on stoneware glazes. Is bisque firing stoneware or cone 6 porcelain to Cone 04 and then glaze firing to 6 a common practice when brushing on glazes or even dipping? Any information regarding this topic is greatly appreciated or any tips etc. about brush on stoneware glazes are also welcome! Thank you in advance!! Caden.
  2. From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is the second "House Wine" vessel that I made. This time, underglaze transfers were added in an effort to build more depth to the surface. These are fun to make but seem to require a good bit of time on the workbench. This one is headed for a November show.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  3. From the album: Forum Discussion Images

    This is a close-up of the lid/stopper for the "House Wine" vessel. I like sneaking in some detail work on areas that don't show when the top is in place.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All right reserved.

  4. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  5. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mug, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  6. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  7. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    Handbuilt stoneware mugs, approximately 12oz capacity, fired cone10. Surface treatment includes 3-d dwelling, carved-out hillside community, and underglaze image transfers. The transfers are new to me...using a CriCut Explore to create silkscreen masks through which thickened underglaze is printed onto rice paper. Once dried, the surface of the mug is coated in underglaze, the transfer is sprayed until saturated, and then pressed/burnished (with pint side to the mug) onto the bisque fired surface. I'm not yet comfortable enough with this technique to try it on greenware but it should work equally well. Certainly there is a story to these mugs...the short version centers around work in some of the poorest slums in Central/South America in contrast with visits to numerous iconic cites in Europe.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  8. From the album: Ceramics Fall 2016

    Turquoise stone and white matte on a dark red clay body. I threw the foot separately and attached when leather hard. It is slightly off balance, but will look nice holding my mini hanging succulents in the garden.
  9. Now that I have my own studio and electric kiln, I'm moving from cone 10 clays to cone 5. This new world of mid-range clays, glazes, and firing is like starting all over again. I'm uncertain about whether cone 5/6 ceramics are correctly referred to as stoneware. Pretty sure that the term "earthenware" refers to low-fire ceramics, but I await the wisdom of those who know better about these things. :-)
  10. I have just poured the inside of a stoneware cylinder (test piece bisqued to 1000oC) with a transparent glaze that crawled horribly in a previous batch. This is a commercially mixed dipping glaze - very reliable by all accounts! Following advice here and elsewhere I let it stand and drew the excess water off the top. The glaze is now like pouring cream consistency. 100ml weighs 153g. I've poured the inside - about 3 seconds. As it dried the glaze cracked - see photo. What does this indicate? Can I just finger-sand it and dip the outside or am I destined for more disappointment?
  11. Hello, I'm Sarah and this is my first post. I hope I am posting correctly. I graduated from university in the UK two years ago from a mixed media degree where I specialised in Ceramics. Since graduation I have worked with a local potter as an apprentice and volunteered to wood fire with some potters. I have also been having one to one throwing tuition for over a year and getting to the stage of starting my own business and I have just purchased my first gas kiln. My website and blog are www.sarahgeeceramics.co.uk I am particularly looking for an apprenticeship or support somewhere to work in a ceramic community or directly with a potter that wood fires. I am very interested in learning these processes and would love the opportunity to develop. Does anyone know of any potters in Europe or places in Europe that wood fire and or gas fire ? And use throwing as their main production of ceramics? I would like to stay somewhere for a month or two ideally. Thanks so much for any help you can offer. Sarah
  12. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    A small set of hand-built mugs (slab construction) with wheel-thrown rims for family friends...both of whom are musically gifted. The orange has a look of atmospheric firing, but it is actually Amaco Velvet orange underglaze. The sheen over the underglaze is from a light coating of clear. The interior and rim were dipped in Woo's Blue. The details on the piano keys are brushed on. All of the rest of the glazing was sprayed. These are 12oz (.35ml) and stand approximately 5in. (12.7cm) tall. These were fired to Cone 10 in reduction.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA All rights reserved.

  13. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These are my prototypes for a new direction in hand-building...at least mostly hand-building. I have never been completely satisfied with the resulting rims on hand-built mugs, so I have incorporated wheel-thrown rims that feel so much better on the lips. The k-cup in the image is simply to add something appropriate for scale...and wouldn't be part of a sale *grin*. All of these are 12-14 oz. mugs and the style and production technique are very similar to the work of Sandra Blain (Thanks, Sandy!).

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA. All rights reserved.

  14. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    This is a large, 3.5+ quart, mixing bowl that is part of a commission project for a retiring university dean. You might guess that the dean had something to do with the music program...and that would be correct. The bowl stands 7" tall and is a full 12" wide at the rim. The black keys were added individually to the wheel thrown piece and later brushed with Amaco Velvet underglaze. The exterior is glazed with Woo's Blue. The interior is Pete's Cranberry. A final light coat of clear was sprayed over the underglazes section for additional sheen. This is a Cone 10 reduction piece.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul Chenoweth - Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

  15. From the album: Custom Mugs and Commission Concepts

    These are the final mugs of the commissioned work for the dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

    © Copyright 2016 - Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN USA - All rights reserved.

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