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Found 166 results

  1. From the album: Wheel Thrown Work, 2015

    This was my first attempt at "production" (making three of the same size and shape). There is some variation but they turned out clearly a matching set! I was quite pleased. The inside was painted with a creamy yellow engobe before bisque firing, and the outside was decorated with the same engobe and coated with clear before the final firing. I wanted to see if the engobe would end up different colors but it didn't change a bit.

    © Copyright Giselle Massey 2015, all rights reserved

  2. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    Version Two (EF-2) of the Tornado Planter has just started a long drying phase. With the help of Photoshop, I shaded out the messy studio so the planter is a little lot easier to see. This one is about 4" taller than the previous effort and the legs of the Wicked Witch are a little larger as well. The container is three wheel-thrown pieces assembled together with the addition of the 2 hand-built legs and 7 building parts. The entire work is stoneware and roughly 21" tall at the greenware stage.

    © Copyright 2015 by Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, Tennessee USA. All rights reserved.

  3. Hi all, this forum has been a treasure trove of information while I was learning and exploring techniques, I hope you can help me with a specific question. I like the look of unglazed clay when it has been fired at ^10. Red clays, black clays, off white clays… I like to play with the contrast of glazed and unglazed fired clay. One thing I would like to try, is to give color to the unglazed areas of my work, sort of like the pitcher pic I attached below. This is not exactly what I'm going for, though, but close. Here I assume the pattern on the unglazed clay is iron oxide applied along with the glaze and high-fired at the same time. Perhaps the tumblers I attached are like a better example of what I'm talking about, you can see she dipped the rim in white glaze and painted the rest with bright stripes, I'm puzzled as to how/what steps/what with. What I'd like to do is work in two steps. First I'd glaze the pot & fire it, and then I'd apply vivid colors to the unglazed parts, leaving the glazed part alone, and fire the ware again, at a lower temperature (lower^ is how I understand I will get the brightest colors). So my question is : What kind of color (overglaze/underglaze/stains..) would a) adhere to mature unglazed stoneware, and become permanent during firing ? This is not for the interior of dinnerware, but possibly destined to items that would get handled a lot. I guess another question would be : Am I approaching this wrong and should I consider another process? Thank you for any insight you may have on this, D. The photos are of work by Ako Castuera and Shino Takeda
  4. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    I slipped this container into a tall spot in the kiln at the last minute to see how my glazes break over the undulating walls. Actually, I really needed the pot for the Anthurium that I received as a birthday gift back in January...it was quite root bound and begging for better living conditions. Container is about 13" tall, stoneware, fired to cone 10 reduction and glazed with a combination of Ohio White, Woo's Blue, and Clear (sprayed on in overlapping layers).

    © Copyright 2015, Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN. All rights reserved.

  5. From the album: Tornado Pot Sketches and Progress Images

    This sketch started out far too tall..so, intentional extreme stretching as I formed the ridges weakened the side walls to allow them to slump. It may be too short once dried, bisqued, and glazed but I've decided to hang onto it. Note: It is about 11" tall at the greenware stage. There was a time when something like this would have been slop bucket fodder...now, I'm kinda linking the looseness of the form and THAT is a stretch for me (just hoping I don't slump due to all this stretching *grin*)

    © Copyright 2015, Paul M. Chenoweth, Nashville, TN. All rights reserved.

  6. GiselleNo5

    MG 3601

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    Slip cast in Moroccan Sand slip, then decorated with white slip trailing.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  7. GiselleNo5

    MG 3595

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    Slip cast in Moroccan Sand slip, then decorated with white slip trailing.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  8. GiselleNo5

    MG 3591

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    Slip cast in Moroccan Sand slip, then decorated with white slip trailing.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  9. GiselleNo5

    MG 3572

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    A slip cast piece made in a vintage pie plate mold with two tones of slip. Fired to ^6.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  10. GiselleNo5

    MG 3551

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    Simple and elegant. I cast this in white stoneware slip and added some slip trailing. The plate is glazed in matte cream with a gloss clear over the center portion.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  11. GiselleNo5

    MG 3500

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    This is my favorite platter from my set of vintage molds. I cast it in white stoneware and when it was leather hard decorated with slip trailing.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  12. GiselleNo5

    MG 3490

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    This is my favorite platter from my set of vintage molds. I cast it in white stoneware and when it was leather hard decorated with slip trailing.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  13. GiselleNo5

    MG 3446

    From the album: Slip Cast Dinner and Bakeware

    This is my favorite platter from my set of vintage molds. I cast it in white stoneware and when it was leather hard decorated with slip trailing.

    © Giselle Massey, Giselle No. 5 Handmade 2014

  14. Hi, I throw with stoneware but would like to give the look and feel of terracotta to the clay. I use (Draycott stoneware). Do you know any recipe, maybe applying some slip or oxide colorant before throwing? Any recommendations? Thanks! Andrea.
  15. cmdutcher

    close up

    From the album: Neriage

    Stained stoneware with Mason stain 6339 (royal blue) and threw it with regular gray stoneware. We'll see how it fires!
  16. Has anyone tried coloring gray stoneware with mason stains? I've used mason stains in cone 10 porcelain and it's been great, but I'm wondering if cone 10 stoneware is colorable too? I can of course test this out, but if someone else has done it that's of course a lot less time consuming! Of course the coloring won't be as bright as porcelain no matter what, but I'm more worried about the shrinkage rate changing possibly if I decided to use a colored stoneware with my regular stoneware.
  17. From the album: Lori Hess of Claybird Pottery Studio

    -this was the first pitcher I ever threw and then subsequently altered ...what a ride it's been

    © Claybird Pottery Studio

  18. From the album: Wood Fired Work

    © Lori Rollason

  19. From the album: Wood Fired Work

    © Lori Rollason

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