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Found 42 results

  1. From the album: Mad About Pottery

    Hand thrown pottery sugar bowl is made with a speckled clay. The body and the lid are coated in a white glaze. T

    © Gittit Rad-El

  2. Hi guys, I have some pieces I want to cast in plaster for a mould. The pieces will not be particularly flexible and I worry they wont release properly. Its a basic vase shape that narrows in at the top like a pair- this taper part is a 6cm diameter x 8cm long pipe that I feel the plaster will grip too tightly to release and slip out. I haven't had much luck with soft soap and I'm wondering could I rub a candle on my piece to give it a shiny and slightly slippery surface for the plaster to cast? I worry it will ruin the porosity of the mould though. Has anyone done such a thing? Other solutions are welcome but I'm mostly wondering if wax will ruin plaster or there are similar products that wont. Cheers!
  3. This seminar aims to introduce you to the world of this art, to become familiar with the material and its potential. To discover what has been created in the history of art until today and make your own unique ceramic pieces. Our goal is to take advantage of the imagination and inspiration that one gets from Ikaria Island in Greece, so as everybody discovers his own personal style and return home with a rich experience and wonderful things in his suitcase! This seminar includes: 25 hours of pottery workshop 3 hours introduction courses (History of Art and Pottery, Science and Technology, Jewelry) Printed leaflet with theoretical lessons and a set of ceramic tools 7 nights accommodation in a double room (shared by two persons) with 6 days of breakfast buffet and 6 days of dinner buffet (beverages & drinks are not included) 1 traditional Greek dance lesson (two hours duration) 1 cooking session- we cook together a traditional Ikarian recipe 1 guided trekking on the ikarian hiking trails 2 excursions around the island (we visit the Archaeological Museum of Campos & we meet a mountainous part of Ikaria)
  4. Hi! I have an interesting problem. I'm making a mug, but I want it to look different from the traditional mugs. Inside the mug (where coffee would be), I want to embed a circular piece of aluminum on the wall. It would be a few inches from the bottom. The problem is: How can I attach it to the wall and still keep a smooth surface? I was thinking of having an indentation on the wall into which the aluminum piece would fit in. The problem is then how to make the surface between the ceramic wall and the aluminum as smooth as possible... normal silicon will be stained from the coffee... Optimally the transition from ceramic to aluminum cannot be felt by touch. You guys seem pretty experienced so I'm sure someone knows! -Harry the Potter
  5. From the album: Horse Tribute

    © christine.dehn.designs

  6. From the album: Favorites

    I really love the way the pattern on this planter came out. This is wheel thrown with applied engobe, sgraffito geometric pattern. Fired to ^6 electric with commercial glazes.

    © Firenflux

  7. From the album: Ceramic Repair

    Do you need someone who can repair and restore any type of ceramic items like dolls, decorative plates, and dinnerware? Then we can be the best choice for your search and can help you in your restoration of any durable piece of furniture to assure consistent and excellent results.
  8. Hello,
 
 I thought that maybe some of you could be pleased to discover the work of contemporary artist and ceramist Yohei Nishimura, if you don't already know it. 
 Cooked at 1200 degrees, miraculously “fossilized†by the magic of the electric kiln acting like a time accelerator, Yohei Nishimura’s fired books are moving far beyond their fragile beauty. Whilst the link with the autodafé appears obvious, what really takes places is a conservation or even a revelation, not a destruction. Admittedly the ink gradually disappears during the ten long hours of firing, but it is a work of collective memory to which the artist invites us with, as the starting point, the first page intact suspended above each work. Founded in 1948 by Yagi Kazuo, the SÅdeisha movement contributed to the development of the ceramic-object concept (obuje-yaki) in opposition to utility pottery (yakimono). Through this ambiguous term, the avant-garde sought to break with sculpture in order to maintain this tension in the field of ceramic. But the irony is that it has thus contributed to the very western dichotomy between ceramic and art (modern, then contemporary). Whilst Yagi Kazuo launched the movement with his kokuto black ceramics fired at a low temperature, Ryoji Koie was even more radical, sometimes using industrial wood reduced into powder to mould his face, sometimes reducing the concept of ceramic to its simplest expression: “to burn thingsâ€, the literal translation of the word yakimono, going as far as simply making a mark with a cutting torch on the ground. Very often categorised as a ceramist, Yohei Nishimura began by studying sculpture and this is undoubtedly a key element in his freedom. When he creates a kokuto piece in ceramic, in this particular case a recipient, it is an object in which to keep magazines that have been fired in the kiln. When he “burns thingsâ€, for instance books or fruit, it is to better conserve them. Transcending the constraints confronting the SÅdeisha members, his work often takes the form of an installation, sometimes involving very different materials and techniques, such as iron, wood, lead or everyday objects. For his most recent work, on a series of books to be thrown out, he has only kept the covers. Painted in a way that only leaves visible the red cross showing that they were intended for the bin, they are carefully framed and covered with a protective layer of bees’ wax. In the era of the cloud, ebooks and other digital tablets, this pioneer in specialised teaching for the visually impaired replaces substance and imagination with virtual and thus calls on our common, universal memory. Copyright: the two last pictures come from his book edited by the Aichi Prefecture Museum.
  9. From the album: Favorites

    I do a lot of this nautical wave pattern on my pieces. this was the first cup I stacked 2 of the patterns on top of each other. I actually meant to glaze the interior with a different liner but I really liked the combination anyway after it was fired. applied engobe, with sgraffito, commercial glazes. Fired ^6 electric.

    © Firenflux

  10. From the album: Favorites

    This was a custom order I completed last year. I love the way it came out. It's wheel thrown, with thrown feet. applied engobe and underglaze, hand painted and textured. Commercial glazes fired ^6 electric.

    © Firenflux

  11. Presented by Artisan Tile NW, thirty five artists will be showing and selling handmade tiles in a wide variety of techniques and motifs. Garden art will also be displayed. The show is at the UW Center for urban Horticluture 3501 NE 41st St, Seattle, Washington 98105. Hours: November 1st 10-5, November 2nd 11-3.
  12. Greetings, I am an adviser to the Theta's, and I want them to do an art project. I saw a really neat utube on how to imprint on ceramic (and even bought the special ink-jet water decal paper to make our logos). Now I was pricing ceramic plates and they are exorbitant. At least it is when I need 40 plates. But, I saw a sale on white stoneware plates. Can I use stoneware instead of ceramic? Basically, you transfer the logo onto the plate and then bake it in the oven for anywhere from 10 to 30 minutes (directions vary). So... an I substitute stoneware plates (cheaper) for ceramic?
  13. From the album: Mug inspired in vintage enamelware

    multiple uses for one mug
  14. Hi everyone! I'm brainstorming about different ways to add text to ceramic pieces. I'm making a set of gray plates and I want the text to be small (in the neighbourhood of 14-point), subtle, and food-safe. I also don't think I will glaze over top, I just want to leave the stoneware (^6) as is. I'd love to hear your suggestions! Here's what I can think of so far: 1. scratch the text into leather hard or dry greenware. Leave as is or fill in with underglaze or glaze. (I think I'd particularly like the look of a coat of glaze and then everything wiped off the top so the glaze just stayed in the words) 2. Ceramic decals, which I know next to nothing about. Are they food-safe or do you have to put glaze over top? 3. Meticulously placing alphabet pasta in place and pressing gently into the clay. It will burn out in the bisque fire. (I have tried this and it works great, but that's a LOT of sorting through alphabet pasta!) 4. buy some letter stamps and use those. (Again, perhaps too labor-intensive for a set of plates.) 5. Paint words on with an underglaze or heavily pigmented glaze. (Are underglazes food safe, or do you have to put glaze over top?) Anything I missed?
  15. Hi everyone! I'm new here, and new to ceramics. I will be hand building miniatures. My main question right now is, how can you tell when the clay pieces are dry? I've searched online, and the only answer I have found is that they are dry when they no longer feel cold when touched against your face/wrist. I have created some pieces to test my clay samples (various types of stoneware and porcelain clay). After 3 weeks, they still feel fairly cold on my face. They are about 1/2" thick, and I realize that drying will take longer with this thickness. But, it seems like they have felt the same (against my face/wrist) for the last 3 days now, and I'm wondering if dry clay still feels slightly cold? Is there another method to check when they are dry enough for the bisque firing? Thanks for any advice! Melissa
  16. Hello My company is sited in Valencia (Spain) and we produce ceramic clays for casting or ready to use for throwing. We produce stonaware, red clay, earthenware... I would like to know from where you get the clays, and I would like to know if it´s possible any collaboration relationship with any of these potters shops or factories. Thanks very much VICAR www.vicar-sa.es Facebook: VICAR Cerámica www.facebook.com/pages/VICAR-Cerámica/173474149476721 http://vicar-sa.es/
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