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Found 194 results

  1. From the album: newer work

    Hand pipe with bearded face sculpted on to bowl.
  2. Kevin Snipes Workshop Heck Yeah: Creativity and Clay WS04 – Saturday & Sunday, 10-4pm, May 14 & 15 2016 Fee: $200 member/$225 non-member Artist Talk: Saturday May 14 at 6pm. Free and open to the public. Heck Yeah! - Creativity and Clay. Come explore the right side of your brain with Kevin Snipes and clay. Stretch, poke, prod, shape, squish and draw out those ideas! Working with both 2 and 3-D materials, he will help you unleash the hidden images and talents buried in your psyche. Engage in fun ways to invigorate your imagination with drawing, painting, collage and sculpting. Brainstorming with paper and pencil can lead to unexpected twists and turns that can be transferred to your ceramic art. Ceramic surface techniques and creating forms will be explored. This is open to all skill levels and artists from a variety of media. Kevin Snipes was born in Philadelphia, but grew up mostly in Cleveland, Ohio. He received a B.F.A. in ceramics and drawing from the Cleveland Institute of Art in 1994. After leaving grad school at the University of Florida in 2003 Kevin has led a seemingly nomadic artistic life, constantly making making no matter where he is. Kevin has participated in several artist residency programs, including the Clay Studio, in Philadelphia and Watershed Center for Ceramic Arts, in New Castle, Maine and received a Taunt Fellowship from the Archie Bray Foundation in Montana 2008. Exhibiting both nationally and internationally, including a recent solo exhibition at the Society of Arts and Craft, Boston; Akar, Iowa City and Duane Reed Gallery in St. Louis. Kevin has exhibited as far away as Jingdezhen, China. Kevin combines his love of constructing unconventional pottery with an obsessive need to draw on everything that he produces, creating a uniquely dynamic body of work. www.Kevinsnipes.com Contact Mary Cloonan at mary.cloonan@baltimoreclayworks.org for more information. Baltimore Clayworks 5707 Smith Avenue Baltimore, MD 21209 www.baltimoreclayworks.org
  3. I am new to using my own kiln, I have an electric one. I use cone 10 porcelain but I don't glaze, I just underglaze. The porcelain after being fired to cone 10 does not come out very white and this is southern ice so it should. The only thing i can think of is that I am putting on a bisque setting till cone 10 (which was recommended by the company L&L Kilns) since I don't do any glazing. Can someone help me out here? Please? Thanks in advance!
  4. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Table piece for holding cone incense.
  5. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Table piece for holding cone incense.
  6. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Porcelain table piece for holding cone incense.
  7. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Holder for cone incense.
  8. LeeU

    Incense Holder

    From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Table piece used for cone or resin incense
  9. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Small box, porcelain, clear glass in well, stamped outside
  10. LeeU

    Incense Holder

    From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Table piece used for burning cone or resin incense
  11. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Free formed shallow bowl-like tray stamped with crochet lace; has feet, clear glaze and bare clay.
  12. From the album: LeeU 3-16 Smalls

    Small box, porcelain, clear glaze in well, stamped outside.
  13. Hello there everyone! First post from a porcelain newbie. Tell me if I'm being ambitious here, though I'd like to undertake a process of creating many super thin 15-20cm long porcelain feathers for a project. I've only ever worked with stoneware, handbuilding with slabs and pinch pots, I've never used slip before - so this will involve a lot of first time experiences for me. I'm trying to plan out how I'll make these forms, preferably double sided. I have access to a kiln a few months from now, so will be able to do some home experimenting (though I'm a total novice in that regard, so I'd probably want to fire them with my local studio instead - however they only do mid-firings, so not sure if I'd be able to) Regardless, I'm happy to make the greenware and store them until I can get access to a kiln. So here are my ideas, let me know if they spark anything in your mind and you can give me any advice/tell me that it's never going to work First idea: On a dampened plaster slab, using different nozzles on slip trailers, I pipe out the stem and an outline of the feather shape, with none of the feather 'prongs' (?) touching each other, leave to dry for a few minutes: (Sorry in advance for my terrible MS paint skills) Once the first piping has dried a little, I pipe out a second layer of 'prongs' and repeat this process until there are no gaps to achieve a 'feather like' texture: I then finish it by piping out another stem on top. Leave it on the plaster slab to dry, then peel off? Second idea: Buy feather silicone moulds used for cake decorating and create plaster slump moulds from them: The trouble with this idea is that the feathers would only have texture on one side, do you have any ideas on how I could make double sided versions? Third idea: Scrap using slip and use a plastic porcelain instead, roll it out thin and cut out leaf/feather shapes before applying a texture to each piece. (Time consuming?) -------------------------------------------------------- Ultimately I'd like to make 60-70 pieces to start with - and maybe more in future if it all turns out well, so efficiency is important to me. I like the first idea the most since it would make every piece unique, though if you don't believe it would work, let me know as while I'm happy to experiment, everyone's previous experience and knowledge is a fantastic gift and it'd be a shame to waste it
  14. Hi Folks, I have started to use cone 10 porcelain from sheffield pottery. Since it is full of impurities, I decided to fire my porcelain pots in oxidation. My pieces are pretty thin and I get crawling just along the rim of each piece....like clockwork. Crawling is also a problem along sharp ridges where curves of the form jut out and then recede. Does anyone use Sheffield's porcelain cone 10? If so, would you be kind enough to share a clear porcelain glaze recipe that does not crawl, with me? FYI, I wear gloves to handle the ware, glaze immediately after bisque so dust and grease are not a problem. I have added 1.5% bentonite to my glaze to add some small platelets to my glaze mix which has made little to no difference. The recipe which I use (from Mary Risley (RIP) at Wesleyan University 40 years ago....): Custer spar 33 Flint (silcosil) 32 Whiting (snocal 40) 20 Grolleg Kaolin 15 Help?!!! Does anyone have any recommendations (bedsides switching to EPK in the glaze. I am in the process of testing it)? Sharon Nahill Oak Hill Pottery Meredith, NH
  15. From the album: Jewels

    Blue and white porcelain pieces as a necklace with matching ring
  16. Hello! I'm new to the community, and I've been trying to find information throughout the other threads, but haven't had too much luck... I've been working with Sculpey polymer clays and glazes to make little charms and figurines, but have been wanting to move on to heavier clays and their beautiful glazes.I particularly love the look of porcelain, but I am a complete newbie, and don't know where to begin. I live in Seattle, so I am hoping to check out Seattle Potter Supply sometime this week, but I'd love to have an idea of what to get before I go. Mostly, I will probably stick to making charms, ring holders, and bracelets at first, but I've always loved the idea of making my own dinnerware. I will be hand building everything, and most of the charms I make are fairly tiny (1" or smaller). The ring holders and bracelets would obviously be bigger, but probably nothing over 4", and everything should be less than 1/2" in thickness. I am wondering if there is any clay I should start with that could achieve a look similar to porcelain, or if I should try to jump into porcelain first. I am aware polymer clay has incredibly different properties, and that porcelain is notorious for being difficult to work with (cracking, shrinkage, slumping, etc). I am hoping that since the pieces I'd be making will be small and not too complex in form (I am fairly quick at forming them now), that it shouldn't pose too much of a problem. Grolleg, Kutani, Dove, Awaji, and Crystal White Porcelains were some of the ones I was looking at that had descriptions that seemed to match my needs. But I also saw Alpine White, which is a stoneware, and wondered if that also might be what I am looking for. I an image (the unicorn) of what I'd hope my work will eventually similarly translate to in ceramics. Thank you!
  17. Hi! Does anyone know whether it is possible to attach porcelain to glass? I mean, attaching a small amount of glass to porcelain is easy, but can a little bit of porcelain be attached to a piece of glass? For example, can a drinking glass be covered with porcelain (lets say 0.5mm thick layer) and then fired? -Harry
  18. EDIT 2 : January 2016 - I've tested the porcelain-paper-clay-based engobes, and I haven't noticed any difference. Even with regards to sgraffito, there's no difference that I can see. Thank you all for your input EDIT 1 : November 2015 - The answer seems to be "yes, of course it's possible". I'll update the message again once I've tried it for myself. posted November 2015 Hi ! *Background information :* I use an expensive porcelain, and generally go to great lengths to reclaim every scraps. I throw my pots on the wheel, and decorate my pots with home-made engobes that I formulate on the basis of a slip made from the same porcelain body, to which I add various pigments/stains/oxides etc. I usually use a commercial glaze, glossy transparent, and electric-fire between 1280°c and 1320°c (which converts to cone 9-10 ?). Last year, for the first time, I prepared a batch of paper-clay using the same porcelain body I usually use. After playing with it, I was left with a pile of bone-dry paper-clay. I crushed it, added water to slip consistency, sieved it through 80 mesh, and stored it in a bucket for 18 months. I'm now left with 30 liters (8 gallons ?) of porcelain-paper-clay slip that I'd like to use in some way. Hopefully as basis for engobe, because I need big quantities of it, and always find myself running short. But I'm concerned about the presence of paper fibers in the mix. Could it significantly affect the bonding between the slip and the pots during the drying process ? during the 1st firing ? Could it affect the texture of the surface of the pots ? Could it affect the color ? Could it cause significant issues with regards to the glazing ? *Question :* Can I use this porcelain-paper-clay slip without further a-do as a basis for engobe, as I usually do with "normal" porcelain slip ? If yes, great ! If no, what do you advise ? Is there something I could do to make this slip usable as a basis for engobe ? I'd be very thankful for your advice, if you had experience with this. Emma Disclaimer 1 : I've been working with clay for only 5 years, with my own studio for 6 months. I try to experiment as much as possible, but now that I have my own studio, I often feel too caught in the production process (to be able to live and pay rent !) to go as thoroughly and systematically as I'd like in the trial-and-error approach. Disclaimer 2 : English isn't my 1st language. I hope I managed to explain my process/problem clearly enough !
  19. Hi everyone I use porcelain clay and I hand paint each work but I'm looking at making a new series of work that I want use the same drawing in multiple pieces say 100. So maybe a decal or transfer? I want it to be a crisp image and on unglazed work that is fired to 1280 degrees Celsius. I'm happy to apply it at any stage after it's built but would be best on bisque. I can only think of those glossy 80s decals that need to be applied to glazed work, but I want a more seem less matt finish with no outline. I wanted to attach an image to this post as an example but I can't work out how.. Oh and these will it be functional works Thanks Lilly
  20. Hello, I would love to start working with porcelain. I found a used kiln which has highest temperature 2300F. Is it enough for firing porcelain? I do understand that different types of porcelain require different temperature. I hope that this kiln will be suited for all of them?
  21. Since I can't work with clay for a certain time, but can't be without either, I was looking for books I could read about our passion. And just in time our colleague Edmund de Waal's new book is on the market. I've already read a third of the book and it's a real page turner if you are obsessed with clay and, in particular, porcelain. Edmund de Waal: The white road (mount Kao-ling - a pilgrimage of sorts). Happy reading! Evelyne
  22. From the album: newer work

    Hand pipe in the form of a baby bird. Ash glaze over white titania glaze.
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