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Found 235 results

  1. Hi y'all! I'm about to order a couple pounds of Laguna Crystalline Glaze (Crystal Palace) and try it out. http://www.axner.com/lagunawc-561crystalpalace10glazedrysoldperlb.aspx Laguna's website says it fires from cone 5 to cone 10, but I'll be doing the first firing at cone 10 in a gas kiln. Has anyone here had prior experience with this glaze? I haven't been able to find much information other than that it is a good base for other crystalline glaze recipes (no info on what those recipes end up looking like though). I'm trying to figure out if it plays well with other glazes and what kinds, as well as different ways to tweak the recipe. Any tips would be much appreciated so I can make the most out of the once-a-month firings! Chloe
  2. Hi all. Can anyone please recommend some food safe, high fire, clear matte/satin glazes? I'll be using it over fired underglaze on slipcast mugs I'm working on. Amaco recommended their SM-10 (https://www.amaco.com/products/glaze-sm-10-clear?ref=2&taxon_id=284) to me, so I'm going to try that out. But I'd like to see what other people are using as well. They can be dippable, sprayable, brushable - anything. I just want to test some different products to find what I like best. Also, I understand that the matte/satin clears aren't entirely crystal clear in the way that gloss clears are, but how much of a difference is there? I'm relatively new to ceramics so any info will be helpful. Thanks!
  3. Hey everyone! I recently purchased a used Cress FX27P Electric Kiln, and after bisque firing the first time with the automatic kiln sitter, I noticed that the thumbwheel does not move, and appears to have some sort of malfunction. I figured out a way to bisque firing while moving the thumbwheel manually, but I haven't tried glaze firing yet. Anybody owns this kiln or a similar version of this kiln and can help with how I can glaze fire (cone 6) by moving the thumbwheel myself? For everyone that doesn't know what the purpose of the thumbwheel is, there are numbers 0 to 10 on it, and it moves gradually by itself during a firing. 0 being no power to the elements, and 10 being maximum power to the elements. Any help would be appreciated! Thanks.
  4. Has anyone tested Spectrum's new Metallic Gold Rain? I would like to try it on a sculpture but need to pay shipping to test. I assume it doesn't actually look like the promotional test tile- but I'm looking for something stunning!! Thanks!!
  5. Hello: During my recent glaze firing I had an experience that I've never seen before in that my glaze looks like it's separated from my work. However, it seems to be a little more complicated in that the glaze is all over my shelves (Ugh. I know). I've attached a picture of a piece from this firing so you can see what I mean. Some piece are worse than others. The glaze that was used is this: https://www.amaco.com/products/glaze-pc-20-blue-rutile The Clay in use is this: http://www.lagunaclay.com/clays/western/wc379.php The ware was fully bisque fired prior to the glaze firing, and the glaze firing went to cone 6. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!!
  6. Hi folks. I've been using a Silhouette Cameo cutter to create vinyl decals I put on my bisque before dipping in glaze to create a negative space design. (it's ain't easy creating a signature look and standing out in an art town) It's challenging (sometimes flat crazy making) because if you pull the decals too soon, glaze runs into the area you want to keep clean and too late, it flakes and chunks come off with the decal and I end up doing a lot of clean up or touch up. Add to that my unnatural love of gooey, reactive, unpredictable and persnickety glazes and it can be a real PITA, especially when doing runs of 200+ pieces. My cutter just broke and I won't be able to afford a new one any time soon. Once I was done stressing out and having a mini meltdown, I decided to try to create something new, different and cooler. I was thinking about carving stamps of my more popular designs and then using crayons as wax resist (I have no love for liquid wax resist and a very complicated history with it) Crayons are crazy cheap at the dollar store and easy to control. Bonus, I can leave some small bits unwaxed to add shadow/more texture... I've only made one stamp, I carved into some craft plaster of paris advertised as “carvableâ€, then pushed wet clay into the carving and bisque fired to create a stamp. So here are my questions…. Has anyone ever used crayons as wax resist? And did they work well for you? What is your favorite carving material for making stamps? I've added a couple of photos of what I've been doing to provide a visual… Thanks in advance
  7. So I pulled this out a bowl this morning and found a 1" crack. I did not see it after bisque - and I looked. How / why did this happen, any ideas? Can I grind it out and reglaze maybe? I don't see it on the back but when I fill it with water it slowly dampens the surrounding area. Thanks
  8. Nube here. Might someone speculate on the process best suited to achieve a surface like the attached image of an ancient tile (Sumerian?)? Right now I have two greenware tiles made of clay that fires white. I'm planning to paint black underglaze on the greenware and draw into that (exposing white). Then fire to the max temp of the clay? Then apply a matte glaze for a second firing? Any thoughts for me? Appropriate articles?
  9. i all, I've recently set up a raku kiln and have been experimenting with different clay bodies. Someone requested on this forum that I try Laguna's B-mix with grog. I was looking for a nice creamy white clay to glaze with a clear.. I like the clay, but have had a few - not all - pieces came out with a few hairline cracks that were happening during reduction. I've attached a few photos. This past weekend, I fired around 10 different pieces with varying thicknesses, and had only about 3 cracks, so I'm not thinking it's the clay. Could I be doing something wrong in the reduction? The pieces were also bisque fired at cone 04. For the frit - I used 90% Ferro frit + 10% kaolin (another suggestion from the forum), but had a really difficult time brushing it on. I watered it down thinking it was just too thick, but it was still brushing on really thick, and impossible to brush on a second coat. I've used a frit before, and know they are not the easiest to brush on. The previous teacher I had used a Frit + kaolin at the same percentages, but I don't remember it being so difficult to apply. I tried smoothing out the bumps, but when my pieces came out you could really see the uneven brush strokes, making the surface bumpy. As you can see I got some nice crackles, but some pieces gave me hardly any crackles and a lot of black dots. Any advice on frit application? Marcia are you around?? I'm still new to doing this on my own, and am trying to self teach myself as I go along. This forum is a great help! I appreciate any help!! Thanks!!!!!
  10. From the album: Ceramics Fall 2016

    I made 4 similar mugs from the recycled clay and iron filings in a glaze called moonlight. I have learned that a little goes a long way for the iron filings, and next time I think I will use less. Most of the filings came through on the inside of the cup, rusting slightly but covered thinly by glaze. Does any one else have experience with using too much iron filings? Do you feel it causes any safety hazards to the average human?
  11. Hello! This is my first post after reading so much fabulous and useful advice on these forums the last couple of years. I'm still a bit of a newbie potter and I've been selling for just over a year. So far I've been really pleased and no complaints or negative comments (exception: why don't you make in blue?) LOL. So I sent off a pair of mugs (Etsy sale) and the new owner is really happy with them, except that he just tried to microwave one to reheat his beverage, and he heard some "pinging" noises. He was alarmed and took the mug out and didn't try again; he's just wondering if I know what is going on. The details: I use Tuckers Pottery 6-50 cone 6 porcelain clay. I fire to cone 6 based on witness cones. (I use cone 7 in the kiln sitter to get there). Glaze: I am making my own glazes. The liner glaze in these mugs was an Assad Opalescent (basic high percentage frit based glaze with no added oxides). Outside was a floating blue glaze (from John Britt's book of Cone 6 glazes: Floating Blue #2) I've used both of these before and have been very happy, and I've personally have had no problems with anything in my home. Unfortunately, I have sold everything at this moment that has this exact glaze combo. Also not sure if a mug done the same isn't necessarily going to be a perfect "test" as glaze thicknesses, exact kiln position, exact top temp, etc may be slightly different? Any advice would be really appreciated! Mostly I'd like to know if in *your* opinion I should tell this buyer not to try to nuke these mugs? I know I've been a bit "reckless" in claiming my things are microwave safe and I'm sorry now I did without being more sure. I've read the forums about the astm standards and I plan to at least test more carefully than just a few things I have at home. Thanks in advance! Cheers, Lorraine.
  12. From the album: Ceramics Fall 2016

    Turquoise stone and white matte ^6 ox on calico dark red clay. A couple very wonky vases that developed decent sized cracks from uneven drying, this was one of the first things I made after taking a hiatus of 3 years from clay, be gentle! I needed to keep a few unsatisfactory pieces to try my experiments. I am totally head over heals in love with the color combo, but am very sad all the pieces developed pin holes on them... I talked to the professor and she is going to go over how to avoid that next time and keep my work together as to have a more consistent firing.
  13. From the album: Ceramics Fall 2016

    Turquoise stone and white matte ^6 ox on bone white clay. A very wonky vase, this was one of the first three things I made after taking a hiatus of 3 years from clay, be gentle! I needed to keep a few unsatisfactory pieces to try my experiments. I am totally head over heals in love with the color combo, but am very sad all the pieces developed pin holes on them... I talked to the professor and she is going to go over how to avoid that next time and keep my work together as to have a more consistent firing.
  14. From the album: Ceramics Fall 2016

    Turquoise stone and white matte ^6 ox on bone white clay. A very wonky bowl, this was one of the first three things I made after taking a hiatus of 3 years from clay, be gentle! I needed to keep a few unsatisfactory pieces to try my experiments. Ended up loving the combo, but am very sad all the pieces developed pin holes on them... I talked to the professor and she is going to go over how to avoid that next time and keep my work together as to have a more consistent firing.
  15. From the album: Ceramics Fall 2016

    Moonlight glaze with cobalt splatter ^6 ox on bone white clay.This was one of the first mugs I made this semester. I have gotten some great feed-back regarding smoothing the lip, foot, and handle. This was an experiment that did not produce the results I was looking for, I had splattered cobalt stain on top of the moonlight (that I later found out had cobalt in it) and the resulting texture is very subtle. I probably will not stick with this glaze, it looked better on the test tile... :rolls eyes:
  16. From the album: Glazed Ceramics 2013

    This whole bowl was glazed in sun valley. The outside ran quite a bit onto the foot and cookie it was resting on, but the inside result was very interesting. It breaks in a light blue, and can have a whole range of color changes as it melts. In 2013 this was the largest bowl I had managed to throw, it was made out of 10 pounds of clay. Deciding on if I want to use this glaze again on future works, as it is very unpredictable and runny.
  17. Hi guys! I was wondering what to do for grinding my own glaze drips off my pieces that are unwanted! Before I had my own studio, I was using a professional one of my friends that worked amazing but money wise I'm thinking of just getting a drill bit with a grinding stone on it! I have a feeling a grinding stone will take a lot longer than finding something electric, Any advice on which to get or what works for you please let me know
  18. Hi guys! Id love to start making my own glazes however I have no idea how to! Where I used to help teach the other artist always made the glazes and now on my own Id love to learn! Ive tried looking it up and watching videos but I just can't get the hang of it! Any help with ideas, recipes, recommendations and options would be great!
  19. Hello, I'm new to these forums and would appreciate some help! This isn't a new problem but I still don't know what causes it. On this particular problem piece, I used: Flint Hills "Porcelain" ^5-6 slip made with mason 6308 (Delphinium) mixed with the Flint Hills clay body Amaco HF-9 Clear Glaze. I do an 8-10 hour bisque to ^04; glaze firing is ^5 or ^6. I'm attaching a photo that shows a sample of bubbles that formed all along the edge of this platter. It happens most often on blue underglaze or slip, but I've had the problem with other colors. Sometimes a mug's rim will come out all bubbly and rarely the bubbles are on the main section of the piece. I dip glaze my work and carefully smooth out any pinholes or bubbles - and as far as I can tell, THESE bubbles along the rim are not visible before firing. Everything else in the kiln with this platter came out great! Here's what I've done so far: I've tried other colorants - several blue underglazes from Amaco & Mayco. I tried clay body slip with mason stain. I've tried other clay bodies. I slowed my bisque time to 8-10 hours. Called Amaco, but they weren't able to help. Does this look like out-gassing that didn't complete during bisque? Do larger pieces require longer bisque firings? Do you have a clear glaze recipe or suggestion that might "fix" it? I'm really hoping you all can figure this out - offer some advise or a solution (yes!) Usually it happens on platters that I've spent hours carving (I sgraffito the work) and I'm so frustrated and tired of re-making work - Please, can you offer advise or a solution? Thanks so much! Carol R
  20. After all the fun stuff is gathered (kiln, wheel, tools, clay, glazes) and you are ready to throw your work into the fiery pit, what temperature should that pit be and how long should you bisque it? I have my favorite clays and glazes (I am using my professors kiln and wheel for now until I get my kiln at home figured out) but I have yet to get a good answer on the correct temperatures and times my bisque firings should be in the kiln. I have mostly been observing and creating the works with glazes while others load and monitor the kiln/firing process (plus they are massive front load kilns over 6' tall and 6' wide). Here is the scenerio: I am using Amaco No. 58 (a red clay). It is a cone 5 clay, but what temperature/cone and how long do I bisque it? I want to put a Cone 5-6 Amaco Shino glaze on it. I load the kiln with the glazed pottery and leave it in there at the setting of cone 5 for how long? I understand it sort of varies depending on the quickness and efficiency of the kiln, but what is the general rule? I am using Amaco No. 11 (a off white clay). It is a cone 5 clay. Same as above, what cone and how long do I bisque it? I want to put on a Cone 5-6 Amaco PC33 Iron Lustre glaze. Once the pots are glazed how long will it take in the kiln? I am just looking for general estimates and I chose simple clays with same-brand glazes to reduce the possibility of bubbling/bloating/other problems. I will be keeping a log and most likely be testing my kiln for quite a while before I delve into putting my better work in it. Any simple formulas would greatly be appreciated!
  21. I just purchased five containers of Amaco Potters Choice cone 5-6 glazes. I just did a firing at cone 5 with the glazes and none of them vitrified. I also fired a few small pieces of bisque ware with the glazed items and I think that they turned out fine, although they appear more pink than what I have seen before. The glazed pieces look like they haven't been fired at all. I am trying to figure out what I did wrong, or what my kiln did wrong. I cannot imagine that 5 separate containers of Amaco glazes that were made at separate times would be at fault. Here are some details: - I cracked the kiln an inch from the beginning of the firing to the end. I did this because 2 of the small pieces I was bisquing were not bone dry yet and I thought that this could help air out any leftover moisture. The pieces were not completely moist. These were not the pieces I glazed. - The whole firing from it's peak to cooling was about 12-15 hours. - I have a Paragon xpress 1193 which I purchased in January of 2015. I have fired it to cone 5 before but never beyond that. I do not run my kiln frequently, I usually fire to cone 05 for low fire items. - As far as I know, the glazes were not shipped to the store frozen. -The items that were glazed were bisqued to cone 5. What do you think is the culprit? Do you think that my kiln needs to be repaired possibly? Suggestions?
  22. I am wondering if anyone has tried using the paint spray guns from harbor freight that run around $16.99. Or is it a you get what you pay for situation and worth the $50 to buy the PH300 glaze sprayer from the ceramic suppliers? Do paint sprayers even work for glaze, or will the just get all clogged up? I make 1" ceramic pendants and hand brush the fronts and backs. two coats on the back and three on the top. I currently have hundreds to do, and I think the time saved by using a spray gun will be the way to go.
  23. I have just poured the inside of a stoneware cylinder (test piece bisqued to 1000oC) with a transparent glaze that crawled horribly in a previous batch. This is a commercially mixed dipping glaze - very reliable by all accounts! Following advice here and elsewhere I let it stand and drew the excess water off the top. The glaze is now like pouring cream consistency. 100ml weighs 153g. I've poured the inside - about 3 seconds. As it dried the glaze cracked - see photo. What does this indicate? Can I just finger-sand it and dip the outside or am I destined for more disappointment?
  24. Hi all, I've just seen that my local suppler has stock of the Amaco Crystallex brush on glazes. The specs say to fire to cone 5. I use high fire stoneware and I'm wondering if anyone could shed some light on the ramifications of firing to cone 5 instead of cone 6 as I normally do. May thanks, Andrea
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