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Found 236 results

  1. This weeks question is less philosophic or ephemeral and more on the practical studio side. However, this too could be pretty deep. So JosephF asks:What is your favorite part of your most favorite glaze and why? I have been working towards a white that works on a variety of cone six clays, it comes from an older formula, but with some adjustment of opacifiers, I find that the color and surface works well for me. Originally it was a liner glaze, and I like the fact that it seems to be quite hard, contains enough clay to keep suspended, and goes on smoothly on my bisqueware. Over the years I have worked with a lot of whites, and none have pleased me as much as this one does. best, Pres
  2. Hi guys. I've started my aquaitance with ceramics and glazes half a year ago. I still have a very basic understanding of chemistry and I have several problems I'd like to ask about. First is clear transparent glaze. I made around 10 of them taking different recipes, but all of them contain bubbles. I've tried bisque firing in various temps, from 600 to 950C and second firing slow cooling, dropping and slow cooling, but bubbles are there and their quantity is similar in all conditions. I know commercial glazes don't have such problems. Please help me to figure out what is going on. My thought is that my raw materials are the problem. I have very few materials for glazes, those are: feldspar, whiting, borax, dolomite, talc, silica and kaolin. Substituting whiting with wollastonite didn't help. The runnier the glaze the less bubbles it has, but running is provided with whiting and borax and I have white clouds coming along with bubbles. Less flux - no clouds, but still bubbles. I imagine it is kaolin that gives a lot of small bubbles. Any chances to fix that? I have stains and wish to use them in underglaze painting, so I need to make a decent covering glaze. For underglazes I bought a few frits, I don't know their formula, seller keeps it in secret, only mentioning temp range. I have 1 lead flux frit melting on 710C and other leadless on 1100C. I need to fire on 1220C, so I guess some kaolin may help to lift temp of frits melting so the stains won't burn out, but more bubbles again? If you have info how to win the fight with bubbles please share. Sorry if made any mistakes.
  3. Hey y'all, I've been lurking for awhile but haven't done much posting yet. I was curious about flashing slips. I have a converted gas kiln (which works very well and I got a lot of really good info from another thread in this forum -- thanks!) and am still relatively new at mixing glazes. (Slowly) Developing practical understanding! I really love the look of flashing slips and would love to incorporate them into my work. Though, being that this kiln was converted from electric and is made up of soft insulating brick, I'm a little concerned that atmospheric firings will flux down the bricks, so I haven't messed with it. The kiln's brick wasn't in the best shape to begin with, but I put some love into it and would rather not be wasteful. So I'm curious if y'all have any ideas about circumventing the notion of atmospheric firings to achieve a flashing effect? Might one spray ash on the surface of the slip? Mix more soda ash into the slip? Make a solution and simply brush it on top? Are any of these methods viable? I anticipate being advised to use saggars, which I'm not crazy about as the kiln just barely breaks through a "medium class" for top-loaders -- not a whole lot of space. Hopefully can circumvent the use of them, too. Holding my breath over here for a guru's advice! Thanks! Kevin
  4. I am trying to make a matte wash with oxide for low firing. I tried a GB wash but it became glossy when firing. Any ideas or recipes ? Just oxide with water ? Gum ?
  5. Hi everyone! I am am new to ceramics after moving to it from metal clay. Things are going well but there is one constant error. I have a small jewellery kiln and it fires to the correct temp and the ceramic and glaze is working fine APART from where the object touches the kiln shelf on a glaze fire. I make pendants and rings mostly and it is so upsetting to have the items ruined or stuck to the shelf!! I use low fire stoneware clay and low fire glazes. So my question is what do I fire my pieces on. I have seen metal kiln furniture, is that the way forward? I am hoping you can help me, if you need any more info from me let me know! Thank you! Emma xxx
  6. Hi Y'all - I'm super stressing cause I don't know if I can reverse my mistake. The studio I work at uses a kiln that can fires to a max of cone 10, but regularly fires at cone 06 and uses EM342 whiteware clay. I somehow totally missed the memo and thought I heard them say we fire at cone 6 (!) so I went ahead and bought some really beautiful cone 5-6 glazes, covered a handful of pieces in them, and, to probably no one on this forum's surprise (but to my total dismay) they came out all kinds of wacky Is there any way I can salvage my pieces? One thought - could I fire the pieces again at cone 6? Would the clay be able to withstand that? Your ideas would be appreciated - thanks!
  7. Why do I get cracks in the glaze after the fire? Any suggestions Thanks nitza
  8. I am new in the pottery. I try to make glaze from raw material. It has so many recipes, which one should I start with? Please give to me some advice.
  9. The exhaust fan in the ceramic glaze spray shed has failed at my local Arts Center. The fan had an open motor and the spray had clogged up and shorted out the motor. What the old one is is a 10 inch inline duct fan. That unit is no longer being manufactured so I need to get it replaced with something comparable. I have seen some fans available on the internet but they are different and are very expensive. So, I'm checking with others on this forum for recommendations. I'll either be looking for an affordable replacement fan for the old one that failed. Or come up with some other DIY solution for exhausting ceramic glaze in a spray booth. Recommendations?
  10. I am asking for suggestions for matte white underglazes or engobes. I would also consider making my own engobe out of my white stoneware clay body but I don't know how. I've never done that. I need it to be able to be painted on bisque ware under my Clear Bright from Laguna. I have tried: - Duncan Concepts white underglaze. It flares up and comes through the clear glaze. Yuck. That's not going to work. - Dune White engobe from Laguna. If applied too thickly it forms micro cracks along the edges. Since this is filling in carving .... I thought I would try Amaco's Velvet White but it says it is only food safe if I use it with their clear. I have extensively experimented with the Clear Bright and my clay bodies and I am not willing to change it. I have been making a series of highly decorated pie plates with carving and slip inlay. I paint wax on a leather-hard piece and then carve through to the clay, then paint it with white stoneware slip. The problem I am having is that the two most recent pieces I've made this way have been horribly pitted, tiny air bubbles formed when I painted on the slip and they did not show up until after it was fired. I thought I had them filled with the glaze but after glaze firing about 20 pits were still open, making a high-investment piece completely unusable. I want to try just carving it plain and painting on/wiping off an underglaze or engobe after it is bisque fired. This is not the item with the issues, this is another one that I made with the same technique.
  11. When a manufacturer states that a specific line of glazes is 100% mixable, and that each of these glazes is food safe on its own, can I assume that means that if I layer or mix colors in the same line the glaze is still food safe? Applied and fired according to their instructions of course. I'm really agonizing over glaze safety and no, I don't want to make my own glaze. The prevailing wisdom, and what the manufacturer's say, seems to be that once different food safe glazes come in contact with eachother, all bets are off as to the food safety of that glaze. This makes sense to me, but I'm seeing all sorts of combining going on in utilitarian ware. Beautiful combining. I don't think everyone is sending their stuff off to the lab for testing. Or maybe I'm wrong. At this point I'm using single glazes anywhere food touches. I'd appreciate any guidance and suggestions. Thanks Irene, trying hard not to contaminate anyone or make any enemies
  12. I finally made the commitment to making a large batch of my standard white glaze in order to move beyond the size limitations of a 5 gallon bucket and the nuisance/mess of transferring glaze from said 5 gallon bucket to shallow bins for plates. I was hoping to find a 15 gallon bucket with an available bucket dolly, but no such bucket appears to be on the market. I ended up going with a standard 20 gallon Brute garbage barrel. I mixed up three 10kg batches of my glaze, which amounts to about 12 liquid gallons. It fills to just above the halfway line of the barrel (the barrel tapers out toward the top). In addition to sitting low in the bucket, there is an annoying trough around the perimeter of the barrel's floor where the barrel dolly locks into place from the underside. I anticipate this trough will make stirring up the glaze adequately a challenge. So I'd like to make the 20 gallon barrel act more like a 15 gallon barrel with a flat bottom. My idea is to pour concrete into the bottom of the barrel to fill the trough and raise the floor of the barrel up by a few inches. I've never worked with concrete before, so in doing some research I learned that it is porous. So my question is: Will the porosity of the concrete matter? Will the concrete absorb one or more of the glaze ingredients in higher concentration than others... will the presence of the concrete throw off the chemistry by trapping one ingredient disproportionately? Will the concrete break down over time? If it is not safe to have the glaze in direct contact with the concrete, my plan B is to cut sheet PVC to the exact shape and size of the concrete slab and seal it in the barrel on top of the concrete. Thoughts, recommendations, warnings and alternative ideas will be appreciated. PS I know the easiest answer is to make up another 10kg batch or two of the glaze, but it's and expensive recipe and I'm out of materials.
  13. Hi. I was looking for a nice white liner glaze and I came upon Turners White in a CAD article. It said it was good with cone 6 and cone 10 and mixes well with Mason stains. Sounds perfect to me, The glaze called for soda ash which I was out of. I called my local pottery shop and he had Minspar 200 which he said should work well as a sub. So I tested it at Cone 6 and it came out very underfired looking. It was dry and cracked This is the recipe I made Dolomite 10 Whiting 9 Minespar 200 25 Custer Felspar 20 EPK 18 Talc 6 Silica 12 BEntonite 2 Zircopax 8 (I used Zircopax plus) Is Minspar 200 a good Soda Felspar? Could it have been Zircopax Plus instead of just Zircopax? What can I do to fix this glaze for cone 6 firing. Thanks
  14. Does this simply mean a glaze speckled by the clay body? I've Wikipedia'd "Shino" and the best I can figure out it's an old Japanese technique using a white glaze which speckles over a red clay body, originally on tea bowls as part of rustic pottery aesthetic. Wikipedia branches off into a lot of info about shino that seems to spiral around getting more ever more complicated, at least to my beginner's ears. However I've heard the term "Shino" glaze bandied about seemingly loosely with modern glazes while watching youtube videos. They didn't look much like the ancient Japanese utensil ware referenced. The glaze wasn't always white, and there was no clue as to what they meant. I don't even think it was speckled. The nearest pottery shop has "Shino" glazes for sale not all of which are white. Of course I asked them what shino was and got an eyeroll. I'd like to learn once and for all what it means.
  15. Hi, I am new to ceramic glazing. Are there any methods that can duplicate fire-based glazing on ceramics? I work at home, so i do not have access to kiln. I have read there are oven-based glazes and non-fire based glaze. How effective are they in terms of the glaze (will it be similar to fire glazed plate)? Thank You.
  16. This might be a very stupid question, so bear with me. Recently one of my pieces has split at the bottom (I made it too thick). I have both pieces and I know that when glazes are fired they connect with anything they touch. Is it possible to reattach the pieces just by glazing the sides that are detached?
  17. Someone asked me recently how I get the smooth interiors of my bowls. Potters that want smooth "non-drip" appearing glazes often struggle with it because they do not understand that clay(and opacifiers) in the clay will basically form a double layer in the areas where drips are formed. The only ways to prevent it, is to spray the glazes in a very controlled manner, or to sand drips that form down very carefully after it dried completely. Of cause drips are not necessarily wrong, but it must work along with the design of the object and not fight it. Anyone that have more ideas around this? Antoinette Badenhorst PorcelainbyAntoinette.com TeachinArt.com
  18. Here is an interesting happening... I recently fired about a dozen of these "flowerpot gremlins" in a bisque/glaze firing to ^04. The dark red on the right was done with 2 coats of pure red iron oxide. The strange looking one on the left was done with 2 coats of red iron oxide and 3 coats of ^06 translucent matte glaze. Right came out pretty much as expected, but Left was a total surprise! The "matte" finished glossy and the color just blew me away. Any suggestions as to what might have happened. The clay was a ^5 B-Mix w/o grog. JohnnyK
  19. Good day, I create ceramic pipes and have been having issues with the bowls / bottoms of the pipes encountering runny glaze. I fire mostly cone7to10 in my natural gas kiln and my problem has occurred most when I dip glaze for 3 seconds. I have spray glazed with greater success but it is cold outside where I spray and I want to stay warm inside. I do production so time is important which means brush glazing takes to long and should be out of the question. So do you have any tips on how to prevent my glazes from running and ruining my pipes? Less dip time? Deal with the cold? Face the long time of brushing? Or maybe dip the top half of the pipe and then the bottom half for 1second and brush the glaze in the bowl? To better understand the question and see my work you can visit ceramicsmokeware . com. Know that your time and replies are much appreciated. Thanks, James P
  20. So I recently bought a kiln and don't know a lot about how glazes work - will figure it out as I go along. Just had a question. How is the effect in the attached teapot achieved? Can I dip bisqueware in white and then paint on top of it with underglaze and then fire? How else would I be able to achieve a white base with painted pattern on top? Appreciate any advice.
  21. Hi All, First post on this forum - excited to have found it. I just tested out a batch of the Folk Art Guild White from John Brit's midfire glaze book. It's gorgeous, but at $30 lb, the tin content is a bit expensive - any thoughts on opacifying for cheaper? Does anyone use a white glaze with tin/titanium combined? I've tried some other recipes with zircopax and I much prefer the creamy white of tin over the bright bluish white of the zirc. Folk Art Guild White ^6 F-4 Feldspar 18 Spodumene 10 Silica 18 EPK 18 Dolomite 18 GB 18 Tin 13 RIO 2 Bentonite 2 -Vanessa
  22. Hi, I'm wondering is anyone can offer any advise!! I loaded my kiln about 9pm last night, and after I switched it from low to medium to high, I went to bed like normal. Today around noon I went in to going unload my stuff from the night before and to my surprise my kiln was still running!!! I turned it off right away. After letting it cool a few hours I was able to peak in the top and my trees looked like this!! They are glazed exactly the same as the other tree in the other picture though. I am wondering if maybe my kiln didn't reach temp. it should have which is why it didn't shut off and these did not fire all the way? Or if they fired to much and they are burnt?? Can anyone help me??
  23. Hello everyone, I have set the kiln to fire at night time and it switched off in the middle of the firing because of a power cut. Can I fire that again to get to the right temperature? Will the glaze be compromised? Thank you! Tatiana
  24. Hello everyone, I have set the kiln to fire at night time and it switched off in the middle of the firing because of a power cut. Can I fire that again to get to the right temperature? Will the glaze be compromised? Thank you! Tatiana
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