Jump to content

blackthorn

Members
  • Content Count

    37
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About blackthorn

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    Antelope Valley in California
  • Interests
    Photography, Watercolor and any Science, History and Languages.

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Not really my thing Jolly, but I just stumbled across this site in search of something else. Maybe it'll be of help. https://www.relyefpotterytools.com/fonts
  2. I used mine touring for a year or so, doing demonstrations. Quite handy for it's mobility and served my well. I know it says it's rated at 25lb but I think that's optimistic. I might have thrown 20lb at one go, but off the hump. Anyhow I hope yours treats you well Cameo. Looks like you scored.
  3. Thanks Mark. Sound advice, as always. I am probably being a bit of a cheapskate. Your purchases are beautiful.
  4. That's the exact model of my first wheel from 1975. Cost me $350 or so back then. That's a long time for an entry level wheel to stay running in good shape. As you can see in your image the top is made of particle board so you'll have to check the shape that's in. I agree with Neil though I would start the offering at $100, going no higher than $150 You'll need to run this one and make sure the head turns true. Mine came from the factory a bit off and needed some nudging. Should work for throwing 10-12 lbs. or less. Good luck.
  5. Any chance of posting images on the finished firing? Would love to see.
  6. Interesting. I've not used Soldate 60. Thanks for clarifying. Actually, I don't use toilet tissue as a paper source either. Only shredded cotton inkjet paper so far.
  7. I've not made one myself just yet but apparently, yes, indefinite moisture maintenance.
  8. Today it rained. Yesterday it rained. Day before that, it rained. I like the rain but my tomatoes are treading water. So envious of you good folk with full on studios and kilns. I shall go now and roll another slab.
  9. Yes Pres, and thank you! Watercolor. From recent trip to Maine. Quite some time before I'm able to go back, so now, just remembering. Great desk project Mark! Nicely done.
  10. Ah, I found an image, though not even bisque fired. Hopefully it can show better than my 1000+ words.
  11. Lately I draw and paint. Typically with the intent of putting it on a pot. But sometimes not. Not as cool as knitting but sadly, I am an unskilled knitter.
  12. Dang! I did put the wrong video up. Mitch has two videos where he creates the colored clay balls. Apologies for the confusion. There is another one where he shows the actual dusting technique and the posted one only shows how to make colored clay. Not bone dry. But let's forget the videos. The still photograph shows the tools and the result of what I've tried so poorly to convey. The ball of clay, having been mixed wet with oxide, is bone dry. [chromium green in this case] So, I take that bone dry ball of colored clay and lightly scrape it across a wire strainer [which I call dusting] and I'll get a pattern like that of the ware you've shared with us. The higher up I hold the strainer the more faint the speckles will be. Any oxide or stain can be used. I have some with cobalt, RiO, like what's used in the ware you shared. Of course in production, as your examples are, it's not manual as I describe but almost certainly, as @oldlady has pointed out, with a larger screen and likely a conveyor belt. When I do this the colored dust settles on the pieces with no change to the surface texture - only color, such as those you've shared. Am I saying this IS the way your shared ware was created? Nah. But you can easily achieve that look this way. As @Rae Reich mentioned, coming up with a glaze with such speckles is tricky. A simple semi-translucent white or even clear glaze is far easier, to which you can then add the speckles of your own choosing. Again, apologies for my confusing attempts but as soon as I saw your images I immediately recognized one of the techniques I use. I'm sorry I don't have finish fired images to share. Those pieces, like me, are in lock down elsewhere.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.