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Bendan Blue

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  1. Thank you for explaining how to use the site! So much knowledge and experience here, it's incredible. I "do clay" catch as catch can, so all help is appreciated.
  2. These pictures of your studio are so helpful. I feel blind by how to organize - it all goes in and out of bins when I need it, lunky and a damper on working energy. Thanks again!
  3. Couldn't find the Min you referred to? I'm interested in glaze making, might be the next fun thing to learn. Currently learning to operate a manual kiln, so could be a while. Been using Coyote, Duncan, Amaco since I do work so little work. Oldlady, could you post a picture of a piece where you did just what you suggested - full strength on the body, half strength on the detail work?
  4. Re glaze, I was waiting to see how these bowls developed - awaiting inspiration, as it were. I use commercially prepared glazes. It's always a conundrum - how to get enough glaze on over most of the bowl without burying the finer detail coil work. The bowl shown below had fatter coils, and no tiny details down the sides of the bowl. These new ones seems more challenging, was almost considering a clear. I'd love your glazing suggestions (color, brand) , have plenty of test tiles to try them out.
  5. Thank you! When applying oxide to bisqueware, is there a way to do so that it doesn’t blend up in the glaze?
  6. It is B-Mix (not the added grog version), and was pressed smoother before the application and sponge removal of FeO2, so curious as to why it's more chalky now. I tried burnishing at his stage, but that was shifting the FeO2 application and was hard to not mush some subtler design attributes on the flat areas. I'll go with a light sand after bisque fire, and hope glaze application helps a little. Thanks for the suggestions!
  7. I applied iron oxide at leather (very) hard stage, as I have not had good luck applying it on bisqueware under glazes. The iron oxide was sponged off (kitchen-type) so as to work with the pieces as little as possible, because the detailed coils were rather dry and prone to split. The bowls feel chalky, grittier than I like. Using a scotch-brite scrubby works a little, but I suspect there is a better way. Should I wait until the pieces are bone dry? I'd sure appreciate suggestions on smoothing the flat parts of the bowls, and the detailed parts too, although I'm concerned about touchi
  8. Neil said to use a vent if the kiln is anywhere near a living space. By this I'm assuming that a kiln located in an attached garage is should be vented. Firing newbie here, on second firing (glaze, cone 5 clay) with used Skutt 1018, manual. Would have to admit to feeling a little weird (fumes) with the garage door cracked a foot high plus the garage side door wide open. Do you think a vent is still needed, even with both doors wide open?
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