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JeffK

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  1. Like
    JeffK reacted to liambesaw in Clay Stuck to Work Surface   
    Unless the table is absorbent it's not going to let go as it dries, the bottom will just stay moist.  I'd wire it off and plop it onto a bat or wareboard or newspaper like you said.  Maybe practice wiring off lumps of clay, you should be able to do it without damaging anything
  2. Like
    JeffK reacted to Rockhopper in Clay Stuck to Work Surface   
    If you try a wire, make sure you're pushing the wire away from you, rather than pulling toward you.
    When pushing away, the natural motion also pushes the wire down against the table - but when pulling, most people will have a tendency to lift up as they bring it closer to their body.   (Made a lot of 'tilted pots' before I learned that one.)
  3. Like
    JeffK reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Vinegar vs. slip   
    I agree;
    But apple vinegar smells better than plain water and does change the local area to a slightly more adhesive environment.  My handbuilding is generally done with soft clay.
    The corn syrup (it's sticky by design) in the SPOOZE mix helps with adhesion of stiff clay.  
    LT
  4. Like
    JeffK reacted to Min in Vinegar vs. slip   
    Vinegar works as a flocculant, same as it does it glazes. Clay particles will be electrically attracted to each other. Magic water works because of a couple things going on, the sodium silicate in it is sticky, it's going to physically help join the pieces. Sodium silicate also dries quickly and dries hard. Since magic water also contains flux, the clay when fired, will have a strong join. The soda ash and sodium silicate are both deflocs. The sugar in spooze acts like the sodium silicate insofar as being sticky and helping the join stay, well,  joined. The vinegar acts as a flocculant, same as if you just used straight vinegar. 
  5. Like
    JeffK reacted to neilestrick in Vinegar vs. slip   
    I've never had trouble with plain water when using stoneware- score, add water, score again- instant slip. With porcelain I prefer to use slip, and usually deflocculate it.
  6. Like
    JeffK reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Vinegar vs. slip   
    With all the talk that seems to be running around lately about adding flocculants like Epsom salts or vinegar to glazes to affect how they flow I can see the logic in it. However I personally never noticed any difference between using vinegar vs plain water, or vinegar slip vs slip made with water. Wiggling the piece being attached until you can feel it “grab” seems to be a better determiner of attachment success. 
     
  7. Like
    JeffK reacted to liambesaw in Vinegar vs. slip   
    I've heard of making slip with vinegar for joining clay, but I haven't used either.  I've never had an issue joining clay that is still leather soft.  If it's leather hard I will use magic slip.
  8. Like
    JeffK reacted to LeeU in Vinegar vs. slip   
    I remember trying vinegar instead of water a long time ago--no success--didn't work,  just as plain water doesn't--the joins needed slip. I use either slip , slip w/vinegar, or, for the best result, Peggy Heer's "Spooze". This stuff generally works miracles for me, when I  can justify a "repair" or just need a super tight join. Once it sets, it may need sanding to smooth it to "invisibility". Here is her recipe from an old post:
    Peggy Heer on sat 26 oct 96
    Hi ...SPOOZE recipe one more time.....

    1/3 dry clay body you are using
    1/3 vinegar, ordinary white kitchen vin.
    1/3 corn syrup, white or brown.
    A drop or 2 of peroxide, out of your bathroom cabinet. This is to keep the
    spooze from fermenting and giving off a real stink.
    Make thin by adding more of the corn syrup or vin. Make thicker by adding
    more of the dry clay body. The above rec. is only a base to start from.
    I use my dried trimmings for my spooze and have a S. jar for each clay body
    I use. Wash tools, brushes etc after using as the spooze will become cement
    like and is not good for tools and brushes if they are left. If left with
    out a good washing, soak in a cup of warm water till the spooze comes off.
    Have a fun, sticky time. ;>}}}
    As Always in Clay Peggy
  9. Like
    JeffK reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Vinegar vs. slip   
    Yes, vinegar works fine.
    So does plain water, and a few other liquids.  I have used them all. 
    the compression of the pieces is more important than the choice of liquid. Also wait until the sheen of the applied liquid goes away before putting the clay pieces together.  Too much liquid in the joint is not good!

    LT
  10. Like
    JeffK reacted to CactusPots in Where do you keep it once you made it?   
    When I was a wood lathe enthusiast; at least in my own mind; I told a potter that I drew inspiration from ceramics, he  told me he drew inspiration from glass blowers. 
    So there ya go.
  11. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from Pam L. in Firing text into clay   
    Excellent idea - you've essentially created a printers layout. Work on a large press sheet then cut out the individual pages. You can multiple up different images as well depending on your production needs.
    @Pam L. - those are also lovely quotes. The definition of calories is spot on! Trying to get rid of those sneaky little buggers myself
    - Jeff
  12. Like
    JeffK reacted to Marko in Firing text into clay   
    The vines are preesed. But the lettering is decal. You can find a ceramic decal printer online. Here's one I use
    https://www.milestonedecalart.com/
  13. Like
    JeffK reacted to liambesaw in Firing text into clay   
    Fired on images laser decals probably fits your bill. 
     
    http://fired-on.com/
  14. Like
    JeffK reacted to Stephen in Firing text into clay   
    ha ha, yeah pottery can get complicated and/or tedious real fast. One thing about the screen printing is that you do it once and then can use the screen over and over again so that at least means that you can set aside time to do a bunch and then be done with it until you have another batch you want to do. You can probably fit a lot of quotes on one screen and then cut them out and use as you go. 
    edit: Just saw liam's post, that sounds like a really good option and low hassle. If you do go with the screen print I would first do a screen with a bunch of text sizes and styles so you can see which ones work the best.
  15. Like
    JeffK reacted to Min in How can I tell if my items are dry enough to bisque fire?   
    Hi BBceramics and welcome to the forum! 
    A simple way to check if a pot still has enough moisture in it to possibly explode in the kiln is to put the bottom of a room temperature pot it against your cheek; if it feels cool then it's too wet to fire as is.
    Candling is running the kiln at a very low temperature to ensure the clay is thoroughly dry, how long you candle the kiln for depends on both the thickness and dampness of the pots. To candle with a manual kiln use the lowest setting you have on the switch (if you have more than one switch just use the bottom one). Leave the peephole plugs out, leave the lid propped up an inch or so and let it run. For pots with a wall thickness under about 3/8"  candle for a few hours then continue with the firing. If the pots are really thick and damp then let it candle overnight. (and reset the timer when you go to bisque fire) Close the lid and put a piece of glass over the peephole, if you see moisture on it the pots are still too wet to fire. How fast are you turning up the switches for your bisque?
  16. Like
    JeffK reacted to neilestrick in Thumb Injury   
    Hand injuries are the worst, but the human body is amazingly adaptable. A few years back I shattered the fingertips of the middle and index fingers on my left hand. The index healed okay, but the middle didn't. Had a broken bone for almost 8 months total while I waited for show season to end before doing the second surgery to get a bone graft and screw. In the mean time, I threw with the ring and pinky fingers on my left hand instead, broken middle finger curled safely away in my palm. After a few weeks of building strength in those fingers, it didn't hold me back one bit. My point to all this is don't be afraid to change your technique if necessary, even if temporarily. There's more than one way to make a pot. There are few 'rules' in clay.
  17. Like
    JeffK reacted to Irene the Handbuilder in Waxing/polishing pit fired pottery   
    I've started using Annie Sloane finishing wax - a non-toxic product used for finishing chalk paint (tons of youtube info on this).  It goes on easily but does require some "elbow grease" in buffing it once cured. It gives a lovely, buttery "hand-rubbed" surface.  Another product I LOVE is "Rejuvenate" floor finish. I learned about it from watching Rocky Lewyky's workshop on Cold Finishes on Youtube. Really worth viewing. It is a water-based acrylic style finish but so dilute that it really sinks in rather than giving that "plasticky" look that other floor waxes or acrylic sealants can produce. I have used this on many clay surfaces, including ones with combined bare and glazed surfaces, or over glaze-fired oxide washes.  It also came in handy when I was finishing some pots from a naked raku workshop. I had not previously burnished or used terra sig on the pieces so they were very textured and porous and I knew waxing them could be difficult. I applied the Rejuvenate product instead and it was a breeze! And no follow-up polishing required.
     
    Good luck!
  18. Like
    JeffK reacted to Babs in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Well surviving a pit fire is no mean feat!
    Whatever method you used you did it well.
    Now breath:-)
  19. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from Sea Winds in Thumb Injury   
    I've just had surgery for trigger finger of my left thumb. There was no explanation as to why it happened - it was on my left thumb and I'm right handed - but the surgery was quick and simple.
    The best visual is imagining pulling a string through a straw. Goes back and forth easily. But in trigger finger, the string has a large knot in the end of it (base of thumb). So when you try to pull the string up through the straw - or your tendon through the covering sheath - the knot "snaps" up through the straw. Same thing happens when you then try to straighten it.
    Had two rounds of cortisone shots - limit that they offer - but not successful. So opted for the surgery. The surgeon basically makes a small incision at the base of the thumb, then cuts open the sheath covering the tendon so the tendon can move freely. Had full use of my thumb within moments after the surgery was completed. Just had to keep the area covered and dry for 3 days, then covered until I saw the doc 10 days from surgery. It's now been three weeks since surgery and I have full use of my thumb - no pain or discomfort. Still a bit tender when I bang it on a table but that has also been diminishing.
    Did take a few days off from the wheel but then just bought some latex gloves to cover the affected hand and sealed the glove around the wrist with waterproof adhesive tape so clay and water couldn't get in.
    Just letting you know this since the surgery is not a game stopper. Any other questions, please don't hesitate to ask!
    - Jeff
  20. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from Babs in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Hi all - I finally got a chance to pit fire the original bowl with pedestal that I created. As I wrote above, basically just joined a bowl with a cup that had a bottom. Seemed to survive with no cracking or separation. I've since seen better ways to do it ie use a thick coil of clay at trimmed bottom of bowl then raise the sides as if you were pulling a cylinder.
    Thanks all to your help and guidance - always appreciated.
    - Jeff
     


  21. Like
    JeffK reacted to Dick White in Waxing/polishing pit fired pottery   
    I use an acrylic floor wax, previously sold under the brand name Future, now sold under the name Pledge Revive It Floor Finish. Others I seen use an acrylic spray varnish.
  22. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from LeeU in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Hi all - I finally got a chance to pit fire the original bowl with pedestal that I created. As I wrote above, basically just joined a bowl with a cup that had a bottom. Seemed to survive with no cracking or separation. I've since seen better ways to do it ie use a thick coil of clay at trimmed bottom of bowl then raise the sides as if you were pulling a cylinder.
    Thanks all to your help and guidance - always appreciated.
    - Jeff
     


  23. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from Chilly in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Hi all - I finally got a chance to pit fire the original bowl with pedestal that I created. As I wrote above, basically just joined a bowl with a cup that had a bottom. Seemed to survive with no cracking or separation. I've since seen better ways to do it ie use a thick coil of clay at trimmed bottom of bowl then raise the sides as if you were pulling a cylinder.
    Thanks all to your help and guidance - always appreciated.
    - Jeff
     


  24. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from GEP in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Hi all - I finally got a chance to pit fire the original bowl with pedestal that I created. As I wrote above, basically just joined a bowl with a cup that had a bottom. Seemed to survive with no cracking or separation. I've since seen better ways to do it ie use a thick coil of clay at trimmed bottom of bowl then raise the sides as if you were pulling a cylinder.
    Thanks all to your help and guidance - always appreciated.
    - Jeff
     


  25. Like
    JeffK got a reaction from Rae Reich in Why make functional ware?   
    I don't necessarily disagree when it comes to mass consumption - the label says it all. But on the one hand you say "hard to be original or stand out in a craft that's as ancient as pottery" and later you state "50 years ago, no one grew the kind of plants for enjoyment I'm making pots for now." Why not buy a plastic pot at Home Depot - does the job, mass produced, cheap, etc. ? You can be original no matter the age of the form or format. You can even create a need. What you produce with your hands, your eyes, your sense of form, engineering, and color is unique.

    The downside is that if you find a growing audience for your pots, you're going to try and produce as many as you can as quickly as you can. Maybe you start an assembly line, producing the same piece over and over again, same style, size, colors, etc. Maybe you hire a couple of people to help you reproduce your designs. Ever see those landscape paintings in the department store? They have somebody on the line who does nothing but paint clouds all day long.  The bottom line is the bottom line.
    I'm going to take a SWAG at it - most here are not interested in just making money. I'm not. I'm happy when someone pays me in negotiable currency  for one of my pieces. And it helps me buy some groceries. But providing something unique, even a simple bowl, that I made with my own hands, and watching someone turn it over and around, sensing it's shape with their hands as well as their eyes, is really what gets me going.

    My contention is that strictly functional pottery no longer exists. A line has been crossed to take the functional piece to design and art. And that's not recent. Japanese, Chinese, and Korean tea bowls go back to the 13th century - they're strictly functional yet they were revered as part of rituals and ceremony. Interestingly, they raised the level of form and design of the everyday bowl. Why is that?

    I don't know if this answers your question. But the potters that I met, who depend on their craft to make an income, both teach and sell their unique wares. And I think they do it because they want to and generally enjoy what they do. Has little to do with what's practical.
    As the old joke goes -
    This guy goes to a psychiatrist and says, 'Doc, my brother's crazy, he thinks he's a chicken.'
    And the doctor says, 'Well why don't you turn him in?'
    The guy says, 'I would, but I need the eggs.'
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