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Selchie

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  1. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Hulk in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    I know that this is an old thread, but I was looking for a way to draw lines on clay - and I am not an artist....
    Found the thread about ruling pens and it was an "Aha" moment! I have been using a drafting set of my father's. He was an engineer back in the 1950's and used them to draw blueprints when he was designing oil refineries. I have used the compasses to cut circles in clay and they are awesome for that use. There were these other tools that I had not clue about. Now I find out that they are ruling pens and I have three of them. One is actually one arm of a compass, so I should be able to draw underglaze circles with it. I am excited to try them.
    Thanks for old threads!
  2. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Roberta12 in tools or methods drawing fine lines of underglaze   
    I know that this is an old thread, but I was looking for a way to draw lines on clay - and I am not an artist....
    Found the thread about ruling pens and it was an "Aha" moment! I have been using a drafting set of my father's. He was an engineer back in the 1950's and used them to draw blueprints when he was designing oil refineries. I have used the compasses to cut circles in clay and they are awesome for that use. There were these other tools that I had not clue about. Now I find out that they are ruling pens and I have three of them. One is actually one arm of a compass, so I should be able to draw underglaze circles with it. I am excited to try them.
    Thanks for old threads!
  3. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Hulk in Stiff hands   
    I agree with checking with doctor first.  Also, hand therapists, who are either occupational or physical therapists understand the mechanics and needs of joints and can help set up a program to follow which will help decrease pain.
    I am a retired occupational therapist and biomechanist, but did not work with hands, so am speaking only as a layperson, here. I also have arthritis in my hands and when I started throwing about three years ago, I would put my hands under warm running water, or immerse them in a bowl of warm water, BEFORE I did anything in the studio. While the hands are  still in warm water, make a fist and release a few times. If you do this before you start working, it gives your joints a chance to move and "limber up".  I use mostly softer clay now. It was a bit tricky to get used to, but much easier on joints.  Gentle exercise is happening when you are working with clay, which is perfect and the exercise actually helps the joints maintain their integrity.  
  4. Like
    Selchie reacted to Hulk in Plates with foot or footless?   
    Hi Titi!
    Plus:
      limit unglazed portion to just the ring - the rest of the underside glazed, hence stronger, easier to clean, etc.
      limit contact surface - easier to make flat (so the pot doesn't rock) and easier to make smooth (so the pot doesn't scratch surfaces)
      provides a place for fingers to catch - easier to handle
      allows for precise thickness - better balance, lighter, closer match to the rest of the pot, etc.
      looks cool
      cut away the least conditioned part of the pot, the layer against the wheel head (or bat) is most likely to start cracking (per above)
      increase durability - ring provides mass and structure at the base, where impacts are likely
    Minus:
      takes time to cut foot rings
      takes more time to glaze
      generates trimmings
    Other:
      plates are a special case, bein' flat an' all...
    Other other:
      We've had a week of rain and wind here!
  5. Like
    Selchie reacted to liambesaw in Clay tools for cooking   
    Oh darn...  I've been doing it wrong all along!
    It just somehow makes its way into every beer I open in the shed.  I think the porcelain fairy comes by when I'm not looking and drops a chunk of reclaim in there 
  6. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Cajonat in Can glazed bisque pieces freeze?   
    Hi,
    Hadn't thought about the fact that, of course, even bone dry, it could still freeze because of water content. After writing this morning, I looked at my dining room table and decided it was a kiln load, so out to the garage everything went and it is firing away. About -4C right now, so not bad. I have recorded firing times and the extra time to bring the kiln up to summer ambient temperatures is minimal.
    Household humidity of 20%! Your greenware would dry out quickly!
    Pres, Thanks for weighing in on this. I guess the idea is maybe to keep the work away from the snow on the way out to the kiln.......Or safely store until ready to go. 
  7. Like
    Selchie reacted to Pres in Can glazed bisque pieces freeze?   
    I have an unheated shop in PA, and over the years have not noticed many problems with glazed pottery freezing, but am careful of dust getting on the pots. I did notice a few years back that a few pieces that did not get into a load had some strange crystal  break up of the unfired glaze surface. I assumed it had been some frost that had gotten onto the glaze surface disrupting my sprayed on decoration. Certainly glad I am not living as far north as some of you!
     
    best,
    Pres
  8. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Cajonat in Can glazed bisque pieces freeze?   
    Thanks for asking the question, Cajonat. I live in SW Ontario and thought that I couldn't load a kiln gradually in the winter. Warm year this year so far; just hovering below freezing right now.  We don't get Alberta cold, but cold enough.
    Had to laugh about your description of your table. My dining room table is full of bone dry pieces waiting for a load so I can bisque fire. So, if my work is totally dry, can I do the same thing with the pieces and fill the kiln gradually? Or is it a bit more dangerous, because they might not be totally dry? I have heard of people taking work outside that wasn't dry and having it freeze and break, but  am wondering about bone dry.
  9. Like
    Selchie reacted to Bill Kielb in Thermal-Light Shelves   
    Ought to save a decent bit of energy as well or at least add some pep back into your firing. Old shelves can end up to be near half the mass of the load. Fired shelves look just the same before and after so a significant waste of energy and not even an aesthetic result.
  10. Like
    Selchie reacted to JohnnyK in Amaco glazes   
    Welcome to the forum RJ...I've been using and layering Amaco PC & C glazes for more than 5 years and have been pretty satisfied with the results of my endeavors particularly with my most recent layering over Obsidian. I have, however incorporated Duncan's Renaissance Shino Cream to my layering for some really outstanding results. The Shino Cream is used primarily in bands around the rim of my pots and causes some heavy duty running with a resulting "hare's fur" look when applied in 2 or 3 layers. You can see some of the results of the layering I do in my gallery. I have not tried the Amaco over other brands yet since I'm pretty satisfied with current outcomes. One thing I can suggest to get a realistic idea of outcome is to use large test tiles or reject pots (that you might normally trash because of cracks or other defects). IMO the small test tiles just don't do the job for good layering outcomes.
  11. Like
    Selchie reacted to graybeard in Custom throwing ribs   
    I've always had a hard time repeating size and shapes with mugs,  vases, bowls, whatever. I decided to try cutting the shape that I wanted to repeat out of a thin slab of clay and firing it to make a custom rib. It worked. I can't be the first one to try this but thought I'd put it out there.
    Stay safe!
    Graybeard
  12. Like
    Selchie reacted to JohnnyK in Is it too late to start learning ceramics for me?   
    I started 11 years ago at 62, make enough money selling my wares to pay for the habit and am learning everyday! 
  13. Like
    Selchie reacted to Bill Kielb in Is it too late to start learning ceramics for me?   
    From someone who is near double your age, it’s never too late to learn in my view and certainly never too late to build on what you have learned. Sort of a viewpoint that if I am not learning something new daily and not teaching those after me what I have learned then I am simply not moving.
    I would say no, it’s never too late, and no there is likely no harm in jumping back in and learning at any pace that fits your life. It sounds like you have acquired business experience. Clay takes practice and folks generally learn at their level of interest and to a lessor degree available time. Generally a few years of clay and one definitely becomes reasonably able and proficient............depending on their effort of course.
  14. Like
    Selchie reacted to neilestrick in Pugmill needed for full time potter?   
    Wedging all that reclaim is going to put a ton of wear and tear on your body. A pugger would be a good way to avoid that. However, it may or may not be worth the money. I'm of the opinion that reclaiming clay is a terrible way to spend your time in regards to profitability. In the time spent reclaiming $50 worth of clay, you could easily make some pots worth more than that. Add in the overhead costs of the space taken up up for reclaiming and and it gets even worse. It will likely take many years for the pugger to pay for itself. The only way I would do it is if I was really concerned about the environmental impact of not recycling, and if I had an extra $5000 sitting around to get a mixer/pugger where I could put my scraps in and run a little batch every couple of days, which wouldn't take up a lot of time. But you'll need to recycle about 13,000 pounds of clay ($0.40/lb) to break even just on clay costs, not factoring in time and overhead costs. I have no idea how much gets trimmed off a pot in terms of %, but say you're trimming 15% off each pot, you need to go through 86,000 pounds of clay to produce enough trimmings to pay for the pugger. If you're able to sell everything you make, then throw away your scraps and put your time into making more pots instead of recycling.
  15. Like
    Selchie reacted to Babs in Ecological impact of studio pottery   
    The straw and camel are flickering past my vision......pristine Arctic ,well you know, compared backstreet suburbia.
    Can we do better?
    Scythes and scissors...no need for gym membershop....
    Kilns radiant heat channeled into better uses?????
    Oh well, back to making compost. Nothing like shovelling s.... to bring on the philosophical thought trains
  16. Like
    Selchie reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Also hit the pottery supply place and picked up another half ton of porcelain... Yes... Another stoneware potter caught the porcelain bug...
    Could be worse I suppose, but I finally found a porcelain that I love.
    CKK6 from Seattle Pottery Supply, great stuff if anyone in the Seattle area has been looking for a good throwing porcelain.  Not translucent or anything but glaze looks fantastic on it and it doesn't turn to a puddle when you're throwing.
  17. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Hulk in hand-building and throwing with arthritis, suggestions   
    I totally can empathize. I only started working with clay after I retired and when I started, my hands were really sore, with arthritis in my thumbs predominantly, but some of my finger joints hurting as well.  I would warm my hands up under running water before I started classes, then as I was in the studio more, I repeated doing that a number of times. I always use warm water for throwing, more for my hands than the clay. I know I am not working for a full days all week, and probably it would be different and harder on my hands if I were, but I do find that my hands hurt less when I have been doing pottery for a few days. 
    One thing that happens when you work with your hands is that the small muscles in your hands strengthen. This is a good thing, if it is done gradually, and seems to help the bone on bone forces decrease a bit.  If you decrease the amount of clay you work with and be sure not to put too much force through your joints, that also might help. And the idea about adding equipment to do the work that is causing you the most pain is really good.  
    I think the other thing about this ageing.....is to keep doing the things that you love doing - maybe modified - but keep doing them. This is absolutely a personal opinion, but I think  I would rather adapt my activities whenever I can, rather than giving them up completely. Especially pottery. 
  18. Like
    Selchie reacted to liambesaw in Sodium Silicate   
    Don't rinse it near any reclaim, sodium Silicate will ruin clay so if you recycle, keep it away.
    After it dries you can make a solution of lye water and soak it for a bit in there to dissolve it again.  Really does turn to glass if you let it dry
     
     
  19. Like
    Selchie reacted to oldlady in Sodium Silicate   
    selchie, get the Dollar Tree house painting brushes that come 3 for a dollar and clean them immediately or toss later if you have to.
    crusty,   i have never used a tan glaze.  i saw that you liked the smaller green glazed squares because they came up when i opened the post.   the only thing i can think of as tan is the large, round tray with leaves on it.  that photo was taken after i sprayed blue slip over the entire tray,  if so,  you are looking at the wet slip as it dries and before i removed the leaves with a needle.  there is a shot showing the blue slip after it dried, too.
    if you were looking at some of the studio photos, you can see that i use many colored slips, they are all over the place in plastic take-out tubs from the chinese restaurants i frequent.   you can buy them empty with lids if you find the  heavy duty ones and the owners of the store are willing.
  20. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Chilly in Tips on teaching   
    Full disclosure: I haven't taught wheel throwing and I am only two years into learning to throw. I do, however, have a background and have taught  in human movement sciences. 
    Our eyes are the sensory system that we usually use dominantly, with our other senses as support.  We have proproiceptors in our muscles, joints and skin that tell us where our body is in space and where the parts of our body are in relation to one another, as well as giving us the feel of things that we are manipulating - hot? cold? soft? hard.  The visual system will predominantly decide whether parts of the body are correct or not.  We rarely, other than in wheel throwing, try to keep our hands still against an object that is spinning. If you really want to be the opposite of a good teacher (not recommended)  - try having your students throw on a batt that has a spiral pattern on it, rather than no marks or circles - very weird, and probably annoying,  if you are still learning.  
    I would suggest that you use all the ideas noted above, from everyone else here - good positioning, anchoring the arms. Then, you could tell the students to close their eyes and feel if their hands are moving.  I know this is probably unconventional, but it makes sense - you are removing the dominant sensory system rather than trying to override it. When I was learning, I worked at first centering with open eyes, so I could get the correct  hand positions, then I practiced with my eyes closed. Then I worked to throw an entire cylinder with eyes closed.  
    Just a thought. 
  21. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Tips on teaching   
    Full disclosure: I haven't taught wheel throwing and I am only two years into learning to throw. I do, however, have a background and have taught  in human movement sciences. 
    Our eyes are the sensory system that we usually use dominantly, with our other senses as support.  We have proproiceptors in our muscles, joints and skin that tell us where our body is in space and where the parts of our body are in relation to one another, as well as giving us the feel of things that we are manipulating - hot? cold? soft? hard.  The visual system will predominantly decide whether parts of the body are correct or not.  We rarely, other than in wheel throwing, try to keep our hands still against an object that is spinning. If you really want to be the opposite of a good teacher (not recommended)  - try having your students throw on a batt that has a spiral pattern on it, rather than no marks or circles - very weird, and probably annoying,  if you are still learning.  
    I would suggest that you use all the ideas noted above, from everyone else here - good positioning, anchoring the arms. Then, you could tell the students to close their eyes and feel if their hands are moving.  I know this is probably unconventional, but it makes sense - you are removing the dominant sensory system rather than trying to override it. When I was learning, I worked at first centering with open eyes, so I could get the correct  hand positions, then I practiced with my eyes closed. Then I worked to throw an entire cylinder with eyes closed.  
    Just a thought. 
  22. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in Tips on teaching   
    Full disclosure: I haven't taught wheel throwing and I am only two years into learning to throw. I do, however, have a background and have taught  in human movement sciences. 
    Our eyes are the sensory system that we usually use dominantly, with our other senses as support.  We have proproiceptors in our muscles, joints and skin that tell us where our body is in space and where the parts of our body are in relation to one another, as well as giving us the feel of things that we are manipulating - hot? cold? soft? hard.  The visual system will predominantly decide whether parts of the body are correct or not.  We rarely, other than in wheel throwing, try to keep our hands still against an object that is spinning. If you really want to be the opposite of a good teacher (not recommended)  - try having your students throw on a batt that has a spiral pattern on it, rather than no marks or circles - very weird, and probably annoying,  if you are still learning.  
    I would suggest that you use all the ideas noted above, from everyone else here - good positioning, anchoring the arms. Then, you could tell the students to close their eyes and feel if their hands are moving.  I know this is probably unconventional, but it makes sense - you are removing the dominant sensory system rather than trying to override it. When I was learning, I worked at first centering with open eyes, so I could get the correct  hand positions, then I practiced with my eyes closed. Then I worked to throw an entire cylinder with eyes closed.  
    Just a thought. 
  23. Like
    Selchie reacted to Min in Tips on teaching   
    +1 for this. Even if you center the clay for them then get them to feel what a centered mass of clay feels like then push it off center for them to re-center.
    I've shown beginners how to center by pushing against the clay with the heel of the left hand between the 7 and 8:00 o'clock position and pushing towards 1-2:00 o'clock position.  The path of force would be a straight diagonal line for where the heel of their left hand is in contact with the clay to an imaginary spot straight across from it. Right hand doesn't do much work. I think a lot of beginners try and use both hands equally placing them at the 9:00 and 3:00 position so they land up with their hands wobbling around the clay as they don't have the strength to squeeze it into center. 
  24. Like
    Selchie reacted to Hulk in Tips on teaching   
    Clay responds to pressure; doesn't take a great deal of pressure to move a two to three pound ball of clay - if you're not in a rush. A seventy pound child (even smaller/lighter!) can throw a two or three pound form, easily.
    Press on a piece of clay - it doesn't move all at once, keep pressing. Try it.
    Once the clay is patted somewhat roundish and sealed to the wheel, wet it and get the base (initially) centered with one hand, there you go. Brace that arm how you wish - against belly, inner thigh, top of thigh, splash pan, something. That's first.
    Coning up&down, imo, is critical, not just for homogenizing, "aligning" particles, and achieving a good center, it's also building skill - how to move clay vertically at the wheel. Apply pressure, be patient, voila! the clay moves. As the feel for making and collapsing a solid tower builds, pulling a wall gets easier.
    Watch others, and watch video. There are many folk who throw really well using different technique.
    Counterclock or clock, whichever works. I'm right handed, sure, however, counterclockwise does not make sense to Me.
    Get lots of practice, but also know when to quit for the day.
    A round bat with no markings helps, else close eyes, agreed.
    One repeat: once the clay is patted somewhat roundish and sealed to the wheel, wet it and get the base (initially) centered with one hand, there you go. Brace that arm how you wish - against belly, inner thigh, top of thigh, splash pan, something.
  25. Like
    Selchie got a reaction from Min in Tips on teaching   
    Full disclosure: I haven't taught wheel throwing and I am only two years into learning to throw. I do, however, have a background and have taught  in human movement sciences. 
    Our eyes are the sensory system that we usually use dominantly, with our other senses as support.  We have proproiceptors in our muscles, joints and skin that tell us where our body is in space and where the parts of our body are in relation to one another, as well as giving us the feel of things that we are manipulating - hot? cold? soft? hard.  The visual system will predominantly decide whether parts of the body are correct or not.  We rarely, other than in wheel throwing, try to keep our hands still against an object that is spinning. If you really want to be the opposite of a good teacher (not recommended)  - try having your students throw on a batt that has a spiral pattern on it, rather than no marks or circles - very weird, and probably annoying,  if you are still learning.  
    I would suggest that you use all the ideas noted above, from everyone else here - good positioning, anchoring the arms. Then, you could tell the students to close their eyes and feel if their hands are moving.  I know this is probably unconventional, but it makes sense - you are removing the dominant sensory system rather than trying to override it. When I was learning, I worked at first centering with open eyes, so I could get the correct  hand positions, then I practiced with my eyes closed. Then I worked to throw an entire cylinder with eyes closed.  
    Just a thought. 
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