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liambesaw

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  1. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Bill Kielb in Spray glazing turns satin glaze glossy?   
    I don’t have a special maintenance connection., I would take the original nameplate  and work accordingly to spec a new motor. Since you know the existing horsepower, frame, service factor loading by measuring the temp rise. Make the measurements then next time specify a more appropriate replacement . Not rocket science actually, every large building fan is specified for continuous operation often at high horsepowers (50, 75, 100.. etc...) when you look at the system operation, you may get ideas on better cooling. Compressors  produce lots and lots of heat so their effect on the ambient temp often is an issue. Air cooled cylinders are a common thing  but they end up as nice ambient radiant heaters for the drive motors.
    With your background I think you could figure out easily actually. Think outside the box, outdoor air  for cooling?
     

  2. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Russ in Colemanite and spodumene in glazes   
    In Europe, yes
  3. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Luca Ask in Colemanite and spodumene in glazes   
    Ok, I tried to wash my spodumene: no foam or bubbles. I immagine that it was already washed before they sell it to me.
  4. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Hulk in Repairing bottom of pot after glaze fire   
    Hi Meredith!
    Cool texture, colour.
    You might polish that foot off so it doesn't scratch surfaces, then move on t' next pot?
    I've been using a diamond grit polishing disc (which I've glued to a bat) to smooth off feet (probably got the idea here) - a splash of water keeps it cool and controls dust, a few seconds straight on, then rotating at increasing angle to round off the edge a bit, voila, done.

     
     
  5. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from PeterH in Colemanite and spodumene in glazes   
    I think it's a surfactant from the float separation process where the ore is ground and then put into large water tanks that bubble air through the ore to cause contaminants to foam at the top which is then scooped off.
     
    It's strange though, because this refining technique is used on a lot of the materials we use, the spodumene and lithium just seem to hold onto it really well.
  6. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Joseph Fireborn in when do I stop giving credit, and start claiming it's my glaze?   
    I remade a glaze that is pretty different from the original glaze when I first started making glazes, it is the glaze that I use on all my work. It pretty much is completely different in chemicals, however I still credit the original creator by leaving some parts of the name in the glaze. The original glaze was called Folk Art White. I call my version Folk Fireborn White. I feel like there is nothing wrong with giving credit where credit is due, and it isn't like we are selling glaze anyways so its nice to remember the people who gave us a place to start.
  7. Like
    liambesaw reacted to CactusPots in Giving practical advice   
    To me, the difference between a casual potter and a studio potter is the studio.  A casual potter may not have a complete investment.  I know a few potters that outsource their firings.  A casual potter can be quite complete with just a bag of clay and some off the shelf glazes or even just one iron wash.   It's a fine hobby with almost no investment at that point.  A studio potter most likely reinvests his sales in facilities and equipment for quite a long time and so has a large degree of versatility.  At that point, is freedom to make whatever comes to mind.  Creativity is the push.  Not to say that casual potters and production potters aren't creative also.
    A production potter has the investment, but requires a return on the investment.  Both material and time.
    I've always thought ceramics was particularly wonderful because there are so many ways to go about it.  The process is the reward.
     
  8. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from JohnnyK in Spray glazing turns satin glaze glossy?   
    Probably need to spray a little thicker.
  9. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from dhPotter in Spray glazing turns satin glaze glossy?   
    Probably need to spray a little thicker.
  10. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Spray glazing turns satin glaze glossy?   
    Probably need to spray a little thicker.
  11. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Giving practical advice   
    Your question in that thrwead specifically referenced production potters, which is why you probably got that many production responses.
  12. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Pres in Giving practical advice   
    Your question in that thrwead specifically referenced production potters, which is why you probably got that many production responses.
  13. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from S. Dean in Customer complaint: handle came off a mug   
    I just give a replacement.  The amount of people who would cheat some way in this situation are so minimal and are the worst people to deal with it's just not worth my trouble.  The caveat being that this is the only replacement they'll get.
    Just try not to take it as a judgement of your work.  Pottery is fragile, things like this happen, but a mug should last more than 2 months for sure.
  14. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Liner glaze   
    You also know what to expect when you're glazing the same exact mug for the 10000th time.  
  15. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Roberta12 in CMC Veegum question   
    You can sub bentonite for the veegumT, it's not as powerful though so you'll need more like 3-5 bentonite.  Cmc is the brushing medium, not sure if there's a sub for that.
    The veegumT is there because the glaze has zero clay and will turn to a rock at the bottom
     
  16. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Liner glaze   
    I think that usually what happens is as you are required for whatever reason to make more and more mugs, you either get really fast at your given process through sheer repetition, or you get frustrated and eliminate the inefficient parts. Probably a bit of both.
  17. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Roberta12 in Making Decals using HP Laser Jet Printers with toner made by Laser Cartridge Pllus   
    Its always sepia or very light sienna
  18. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Dick White in Flocculation and deflocculation -- how much is enough?   
    There's a point of saturation with flocculants and deflocculants when there is so much that it actually flocculates or deflocculates itself and settles out, giving the opposite affect.
  19. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Dick White in Flocculation and deflocculation -- how much is enough?   
    And, not to put too fine a point on it, if you tried, you probably could flocculate a glaze slurry with so much epsom salt or calcium chloride (or overdeflocculate it with so much sodium silicate) that it too would just sit in the Ford cup and not drain. (That's another thing about the Zahn/Ford cups, they come with different bottom hole sizes, so the drain rate may be different. For example, one commercial glaze purveyor states in their instructions that it should empty from their Zahn cup in 18 seconds. Either that is one hella thick glaze (probably not), or their cup has one hella small hole (more likely).) The trick is to get the right balance of specific gravity and flocculation or deflocculation in your dipping glaze so that it applies the right thickness of glaze to your ware and then flows off nicely with no drips as you withdraw the piece from the bucket.
  20. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Bill Kielb in Flocculation and deflocculation -- how much is enough?   
    I stop when it behaves how I want
    I only deflocculate my glazes to stop them from cracking and peeling off of eachother.  Have never needed to flocculate
  21. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Hulk in How much glycerin to add to slip for improved brushability?   
    We used Floetrol for cutting and rolling water borne products on hot days, dry days - for some paint, any day. It really shines for spraying, great product.
    Vinyl acetate, n-butyl acrylate polymer, water.
  22. Like
    liambesaw reacted to Bill Kielb in How much glycerin to add to slip for improved brushability?   
    Nope, propenoic acid, (acrylic acid)
  23. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Min in Experimenting and creating wood ash recipes   
    Pehatine for those of us in the US is brushing medium
  24. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in What is this chemical? For fun   
    If you zoom in it's spelled korrectly. There's just a rust stain that makes it look not
  25. Like
    liambesaw got a reaction from Babs in What is this chemical? For fun   
    If you zoom in it's spelled korrectly. There's just a rust stain that makes it look not
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