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shawnhar

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  1. Like
    shawnhar reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    So I spent the weekend making more of these, and I really like to make them.  I keep improving on the design which means I'm learning.  Learning makes me happy!  So anyway, was able to finally glaze fire some and I like the result.  Here's one from the batch

  2. Like
    shawnhar got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    2 feet of snow... ya'll are crazy! 
    Feels good to have something on the bench, life's been busy, wife sold her store, we opened a new one in a nearby small town and I've actually sold a few things there already, tried a booth at a local shop that rents booths but  it's not done much better than the rent. We had to practice like 30 hours for a gig at a friend's party, that was awesome, made people cry, felt good to nail it for a change.
    Anyway, uggg, you don't throw for a while and for me anyway, let's just say the first few mugs will have carving around the bottoms, a couple might not make it due to thin bottoms, and I felt a bit rusty, lol. Sure does feel good to spin some mud though, nothin' like it.
     

  3. Like
    shawnhar got a reaction from Hulk in What’s on your workbench?   
    2 feet of snow... ya'll are crazy! 
    Feels good to have something on the bench, life's been busy, wife sold her store, we opened a new one in a nearby small town and I've actually sold a few things there already, tried a booth at a local shop that rents booths but  it's not done much better than the rent. We had to practice like 30 hours for a gig at a friend's party, that was awesome, made people cry, felt good to nail it for a change.
    Anyway, uggg, you don't throw for a while and for me anyway, let's just say the first few mugs will have carving around the bottoms, a couple might not make it due to thin bottoms, and I felt a bit rusty, lol. Sure does feel good to spin some mud though, nothin' like it.
     

  4. Like
    shawnhar got a reaction from Rae Reich in What’s on your workbench?   
    2 feet of snow... ya'll are crazy! 
    Feels good to have something on the bench, life's been busy, wife sold her store, we opened a new one in a nearby small town and I've actually sold a few things there already, tried a booth at a local shop that rents booths but  it's not done much better than the rent. We had to practice like 30 hours for a gig at a friend's party, that was awesome, made people cry, felt good to nail it for a change.
    Anyway, uggg, you don't throw for a while and for me anyway, let's just say the first few mugs will have carving around the bottoms, a couple might not make it due to thin bottoms, and I felt a bit rusty, lol. Sure does feel good to spin some mud though, nothin' like it.
     

  5. Like
    shawnhar got a reaction from LeeU in What’s on your workbench?   
    2 feet of snow... ya'll are crazy! 
    Feels good to have something on the bench, life's been busy, wife sold her store, we opened a new one in a nearby small town and I've actually sold a few things there already, tried a booth at a local shop that rents booths but  it's not done much better than the rent. We had to practice like 30 hours for a gig at a friend's party, that was awesome, made people cry, felt good to nail it for a change.
    Anyway, uggg, you don't throw for a while and for me anyway, let's just say the first few mugs will have carving around the bottoms, a couple might not make it due to thin bottoms, and I felt a bit rusty, lol. Sure does feel good to spin some mud though, nothin' like it.
     

  6. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Marcia Selsor in What’s on your workbench?   
    I like that exhaust filter. I could use one. I use a vapor mask for the chlorides and sulphates I am using. 
    Marcia
  7. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in What’s on your workbench?   
    New mugs, and a commission for tiny display dishes for a spice shop. 


  8. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Digital organization for pottery business   
    I’m maybe a little less fancy. I have folders of images sorted chronologically, clustered every 6 months to a year depending on how productive I’ve been with new work. 
    I’ll make folders of images that have been edited and that are suitable for applications, but beyond that it becomes too much upkeep. 
    I do have to say that even if it’s just a phone picture, take a moment to document things before they sell. You will always regret it if you don’t. Take the image in the largest format you can. If you must use your phone, use your phone’s native camera app, not something like VISCO or even directly into Instagram. Don’t crop the image while you’re capturing it: do that afterwards when you’re editing: give yourself the maximum amount of information to work with. 
  9. Like
    shawnhar reacted to neilestrick in Problems with dunting   
    I don't think it's a firing speed issue. If it survived bisque without cracking it should be able to survive a relatively quick firing and cooling, especially since it's not a super tight body. In my experience, horizontal and diagonal cracks in a cylinder point to either cristobalite issues or glaze COE issues. Because we're seeing it on two different glazes, and on pots that aren't all that thin, I'm blaming the clay. I don't think changing the firing speed is going to improve the situation. I'd first try firing hotter. Even just 1/2 cone may help, which you can accomplish with a 10-15 minute hold at the end of the firing. It'll tighten up the body, but hopefully it won't be enough to mess up how the glazes look.
  10. Like
    shawnhar reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Did the farmers market again this week, my big seller this time was small lidded jars.  I made a bunch last week and sold them all.  Forgot to take pictures whoops.
     
    Guess I'll go ahead and make a bunch more of those!
  11. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    Table vase from recent firing. This one used a white glaze on the entire piece inside and out. As compared to the one before you can see how the white glaze bleaches browns on the SS 630

  12. Like
    shawnhar reacted to GEP in What’s on your workbench?   
    @liambesaw, the way I see it, it’s much better to start out with low prices, and raise them if the pots are flying off the shelf. Compared to starting out with overpriced pots, and having to lower the prices. Especially at a recurring market like a farmers market, where the same customers are going to see the evolution of your prices. 
    Also, don’t let others pressure you into raising your prices. Especially from across the internet. We don’t know the area where you’re selling. Every location has different market forces. Base your pricing decisions on how fast your pots are selling. 
    From across the internet, I can’t judge the weight and balance of your pots. But from what I can see, your pots are very attractive and of good craftsmanship. So present them with a sense of respect, not like bargain fodder. Which is related, but not specifically the same thing, as the number on the price tag. 
    This market is a good choice for your first attempt at fair selling, due to its low booth fee. You can continue to do it this summer for the experience, but I would also start looking for something that is a step up. Where you won’t be selling pots next to snake oil. 
  13. Like
    shawnhar reacted to liambesaw in What’s on your workbench?   
    Well I did my farmers market today, got out in the sun and got a lot of sketching done :/
    Made 55 dollars, which was more than i was expecting since this was a 20 tent market and I was one of two Craftsmen there.  
    luckily the booth fee was only 10 dollars!
    man there are some really weird people out there...
    Guy to the left of me was selling bleach water (FOR DRINKING!!!) and the booth across from me was selling essential oils... Don't these people know how dangerous those things are!? 




  14. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Marcia Selsor in What’s on your workbench?   
    working on a new batch of pots for soluble salts. will be writing 2 articles about discoveries in PMI and Revisita Ceramica International. Workshop schedule filling up for 2020. 
     
    Marcia

  15. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    Hi folks, 
    I have been doing some thinking about the white liner glaze that I have been dipping the hazelnut and the white clays in before spray glazing. So I decided to try a piece without glazing the whole piece in the white glaze, just the inside and neck. I think you can see the difference. Seems like to me, the white is bleaching out the cream rust glaze here, pieces I had sprayed with the cream rust, the variegated blue and the rutile green would always be more blue and green. Interestingly enough, the hazelnut pieces would have more browns in them. 

     
    best,
    Pres
  16. Like
    shawnhar reacted to DirtRoads in Bill Board Advertising?   
    Yes, I'm surprised at how much business this has generated.   It's on Hwy 16, an incoming route for people from Alabama going to Pearl River resort (casinos, water park & Nick Fazzio golf course).   I think it's important to always "know what you don't know".   I have tried bill boards in past businesses, even on this same high way.  I only got a handful of customers to my other businesses.  The key to this one is the DIRECTION that the customers are coming from.  Alabama, not cities like Jackson, MS.  These Alabama customers come over 2 or 3 times a year for a few days  away.  Also, the golf course gets a decent number of conventions of golfers (and their wives).     What this has done, is given me a small slice of a tourist market.    Really picked up my summer sales.     Had a 40% sales increase last year and am seeing a 30% increase this year.   I plan on going after a little more of the tourist market.    Just started on construction yesterday,  adding 640 square foot more to my retail space.    Will put in an area of "Mississippi" gifts and have a couple of marketing ideas to bring more tourist business here.    I've had this sign for 18 months.     Before this 60 foot sign, I shared a small spot on a multi board and I think I got 2 customers from it.   I can almost identify the "sign people" when they come in the store.    They have lowered my sales closure ratio.   We used to have a 95% buying conversion and it's lower now.   Also, the sign customers have lowered my average sale.  but thhe amount of traffic it generates is significant.   And I can get some very large sales form it.  Like the 6 ladies from Atlanta that were here for a golf outing and they more than paid the sign bill for an entire year.   And some customers become repeat customers.   Overall, it's definitely profitable.  
    I'm not sure this would even apply to a lot of the readers here.   But the key is to constantly look at your market.   I see a lot of people here that are oblivious to market opportunities.      Two years ago, I would have said "hmmm don't think bill board advertising would work for my type of business".    But NOW, I'm nailing down a second bill board location.  I'll definitely put a pottery picture on the next design too.  What makes this work .. is "Straight Ahead 11 Miles".  I've had 100 plus customers say "well it's just 11 miles here".   And the website.  I get website pings from that area where people are checking Dirt Roads out.  My web traffic went up 5X last year.
  17. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Pres in What’s on your workbench?   
    These are waiting for glaze firing tomorrow or next.




  18. Like
    shawnhar got a reaction from Hulk in What’s on your workbench?   
    Sponge holders and berry bowls, just loaded the kiln with these and some 6 lb bowls.

  19. Like
    shawnhar reacted to liambesaw in tiny spherules in wet glaze   
    Have you tried sieving it and not getting anything? Normally if it's crystallized in the bucket you can sieve out the lithium and other crystals and dissolve them in hot water before adding them back in
  20. Like
    shawnhar reacted to neilestrick in tiny spherules in wet glaze   
    I get them too. It's probably from the boron, because I never had them in my cone 10 glazes, which didn't use boron.
  21. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Mark C. in tiny spherules in wet glaze   
    Run that glaze in a blender at full speed for a few minutes then seive-then galze the pots.
    It looks more like the surface of vthe moon arew you sure thats not a luner photo???I think I see a little flag off to the side ?
  22. Like
    shawnhar reacted to dhPotter in tiny spherules in wet glaze   
    Pete's Seafoam needs sieving before each glaze session. I get the same little hard balls. Shawnhar they will not go thru a 100# mesh. My glazes sat for 6 weeks before yesterday's session.  I sieved the glaze, using 100 mesh, and the balls appeared. This happens everytime if glazes sit up.  I took a 1/2 cup of glaze and mixed the little balls into it. Then into the microwave for 45 seconds on high, thinking they would dissolve - they did not.
    I am thinking it is the Strontium Carb doing this. I have not a solution for the problem.
    Pete's Seafoam
      Ferro Frit 3134.............     9.60  
      F-4 Feldspar................    51.30  
      Strontium Carbonate.........    25.50  
      EP Kaolin...................    12.00  
      Copper Carbonate............     5.00  
      Titanium Dioxide............     5.00  
      Glaze Jelly.................     3.00  
                                  =========
                                     111.40
  23. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Pres in tiny spherules in wet glaze   
    I get something like that in my glazes after they have frozen, but always get strained out after running through an 80 mesh screen. I have come to screening glaze every time I run a glaze load as it saves trouble with little bits of bisque etc that get into the glaze.
     
    best,
    Pres
  24. Like
    shawnhar reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in tiny spherules in wet glaze   
    The “little balls” are precipitated crystals of some part of one or more of the glaze ingredients. If the ingredients in the glaze recipe are necessary for the glaze to be successful, one can safely assume that removing the “little balls” will change the glaze in some fashion.   If the balls are not easily dissolved, the remove the balls, dry them, and crush / grind them to a small particle size.  I would use a mortar and pestle, or ball mill, depending on the volume of the “little balls”; after all, the glaze slurry is just a mixture of smaller balls. 
     
    The reason fit the formation of the “little balls” could be evaporation of the water, temperature changes, or contamination from pots or tools dipped in the glaze.  A detailed identification of the little balls would be an excellent sophomore lab assignment for analytical chemistry; tedious but not difficult. Most of us don’t need to search for a sophomore chemistry student to join our studio staff. 
    LT 
     
    As a footnote, if removing the “little balls“ works for your situation, have at it!  Don’t waste time and energy solving a non-problem!
  25. Like
    shawnhar reacted to neilestrick in First Art Fair   
    Keep some inventory aside if you need to. You don't have to have everything out all at once. Too much will overwhelm people. Just keep the surplus organized so it's easy to find a certain color/shape/size if someone asks for it.
    Get a good cooler and keep it stocked with food and beverages. There's nothing worse than being hungry or thirsty while sitting there. Keep rain gear and a full change of clothes in your booth, including shoes and undergarments. You might need them if the weather turns.
    Never apologize for your work. If someone critiques it, either thank them for their ideas or explain why you did it the way you did. But never admit that it's flawed in some way. Most flaws are only visible to you. Don't de-value your work with your words.
    Pricing is difficult, so go with your gut until you've done a few more shows and have a better feel for what prices your work can get. I never change prices for specific shows. If they won't sell at a certain price, that show probably isn't a good fit for my work anyway.
    Every artist has something they say to almost everyone that comes into their booth. For me it's telling them that my pieces are dishwasher and microwave safe. It's the question I get the most, so I open with that. It breaks the ice. Figure out something simple and interesting that will get the conversation going. Give people time to look. Don't pounce on them. Find that balance between letting them know that you're paying attention to them, but giving them their space.
    Good luck!
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