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Pres

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  1. Like
    Pres reacted to Babs in Newbie buy 1st kiln deciding btwn used paragon and new olympic   
    Dont know but don't go too small, this clay is addictive,  you may outgrow small kiln fast.
    One thung ,important thougg is the wiring these kilns may need, adding to the cost.
    Generalcomments, no kiln expert here
  2. Like
    Pres reacted to Min in QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?   
    I'm all about durability and functionality with most of the pots I make, I like my clay vitrified to the point that it won't leak without glaze, for me it's midrange stoneware or porcelain.  Would be great if there was a commercial body that was in the cone 2-3 range that met those requirements. I'ld gladly pay a bit more to fire lower than ^6 and yet have a clay that would be less expensive than a lowfire fritware body. Would probably need to use more frits in glazes than I currently use at ^6 but I think the decreased wear on the kiln elements (and kiln itself) would more than offset that cost. 
  3. Like
    Pres reacted to Roberta12 in QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?   
    Midrange is really all I have known.  And to echo what Min said, I am on the platform for functionality and durability as well.  I love the variety of clays at midrange.  Porcelain (like) stoneware, dark, light, grog, smooth.  I love what it all brings to the table.  
    Roberta
  4. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Min in QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?   
    Hi folks, once again nothing in the pool for QotW questions. . . Hope everyone knows where it is?? At any rate, after the last barrage on electric vs gas firings, I thought why not on firing temps?
    QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?
    This has been an interesting question for me over the years. I grew up as most of you remember with my parents painting bisqueware and having it fired. They could do it in the shop where they got the bisqueware and had it fired, or they could as they often did, work on it at home, sanding and glazing. I was never really much involved with it, being more interested in other things at the time. Then after three years of college with a Math/Science emphasis I  ended up in a college ceramics class in the summer. This was ^10 gas fired stoneware, and wheel throwing, or handbuilding. I became too involved with the wheel to do much handbuilding. Glazing was simple dip and pour with brushed oxides, simple and direct I loved it! Another Ceramics class confirmed my love of ceramics. Then I went to teach at a large HS in Central PA. They were just ramping up with more art courses, and had added a new teacher the previous year, then me, for a department of 3. The teacher hired before me had started a ceramics class, and was doing cone 06 Earthenware clays form Amaco with Amaco glazes. I worked that year on the 2 speed Amaco wheel with students and over the next few years the program became mine, and I moved it to ^6 immediately as I really did not like the Amaco clay, and had checked out several of the clay bodies from SC, choosing one that I thought looked most like a ^10 body that was also good for handbuilding and throwing, SC 112. I also took several courses at PSU allowing me to explore more in the way of throwing(large) firing salt and regular reduction, and glaze formulation.  After we bought a house with a garage, I decided to set up a shop. Bought a motorized kick, and a kiln. . . . I had gotten over ^10 knowing it would never work on main street. Earthenware? I really never liked the feel of it for throwing or otherwise. I always thought of it as being "not as nice", even the ring was false to me, and I know I will get some sour retorts on that statement, but it is IMHO.
    So once again,  
    QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?
     
    So once again 
  5. Like
    Pres reacted to Marcia Selsor in QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?   
    ^6 for functional work. Low fire for experimenting with alternative firings. I am moving my soluble salts to ^6 in the near future with a glaze. Meanwhile, using a small amount of earthenware for a pit firing coming up in may with friends.
     
    Marcia
     
  6. Like
    Pres reacted to Chilly in QotW: Earthenware or mid range Stoneware, What is your preference and why?   
    Wow @Pres, you posted this question 21 hours ago and no-one has yet replied......
    For me, the answer has to be "both".
    I like ^6, but my little kiln doesn't.  The one at the community centre likes ^6, but no-one else does, or needs ^6.  
    So, for some purposes, ^04 is fine, the glazes are more plentiful (UK), they come in every colour including special effects.  They suit the users at the community centre, and make my life as the advisor and firing tech much easier.
     
    But for mugs, outdoor pots, bonsai pots, casserole dishes, I still want ^6.  Or higher and wood fired.
  7. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in New L & L kiln   
    I have my TC's about 3/8" from the end of the tubes, and I haven't seen any flaking into the kiln yet after about 20 firings. Definitely some flakes visible inside the tubes, though. So far so good.
  8. Like
    Pres reacted to liambesaw in Food Safe?   
    Yep, food safe.  Nothing in there that would ever harm anyone.  Within acceptable limits of lead and cadmium, so dinnerware safe!
     
  9. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in Buying a used kiln   
    The only down side of buying new right now is that the lead time on kilns is 8-12 weeks. You may be able to find a basic Easy Fire model in stock from Clay-King, but if you want the Genesis controller upgrade or quad elements (both of which I highly recommend) they probably won't have that. It would be worth the wait, though!
  10. Like
    Pres reacted to Min in Standing to throw   
    Think part of the equation is how tall the extension legs / pipes are if you go the route of lengthening the pipe legs on your Brent. I'm little, I only had to add 14" to the height to make it the right height for me standing. I don't lean on a stool, I stand, wheel head is roughly at my belly button height. (think it's at a different height for different sized / taller people) The wood table legs I used are firmly attached inside the pipe legs, it doesn't wiggle. I can see if you needed really long leg extensions that it might wiggle, there have been some great suggestions for reinforcing so far. A couple more ideas would be to add a base or use muffler pipe and get the muffler shop to flare the two legs at the front of the wheel outwards like the Brent leg extensions, wider base will be more stable.  Rough drawing below of how I would do a base, cutout at the front of the wheel so there is room for your feet, I'ld make it out of plywood and cut circles where the leg extensions fit into, if it's wedged in there it can't wiggle. If you go the leg extension route you could try it without the base, see if it works then add the base if not.

  11. Like
    Pres reacted to JohnnyK in Standing to throw   
    Something else you could do here for stability is wrap the legs with plastic, then squirt some of that expandable foam into the voids around the legs. When it firms up, the foam will make the legs rigid and the plastic wrap will allow you to remove the extension, if necessary...
  12. Like
    Pres reacted to Dick White in Standing to throw   
    And, when throwing standing up, position the wheel so that when you are standing, your back is braced against something solid, like a wall or a support post. You will need to put some seat cushion foam on the wall to make pressing back against it more comfortable.
  13. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in Standing to throw   
    Lots of people just use cinder blocks. Might need shimming to get it exactly where you want.
  14. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Roberta12 in Standing to throw   
    Plastic pipe, put end caps on them for the legs. Drill holes for bolts in the pipes, use a bolt and nut to make block to height. You can fancy this up by adding multiple holes to make it more adjustable and even add another row of holes to make a cross of two bolts, add a plywood plug on top.
     
    best,
    Pres
  15. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Min in Standing to throw   
    Plastic pipe, put end caps on them for the legs. Drill holes for bolts in the pipes, use a bolt and nut to make block to height. You can fancy this up by adding multiple holes to make it more adjustable and even add another row of holes to make a cross of two bolts, add a plywood plug on top.
     
    best,
    Pres
  16. Like
    Pres reacted to Mark C. in Spring demand is way up   
    Spring orders are rolling in (wholesale) and local sales are at a all time high min some venues. I had the best 1st quarter at one market almost tied the 4th quarter at same market.
    This summer looks to be a strong one with local tourists . Last year we had more tourists than normal; and this year we all think there will be more with current situtaion with shots in arms happening now.
    By fall shows may be back as well. My slow down schedule has taken a beating-I need a new plan
  17. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Min in Handbuilt plates/high fire/glazing question...   
    I would suggest that you look at the shrinkage , and the absorption of the 182 at both of the firing temps. Then look at the shrinkage and absorption of 563 and 630 from SC. This gives you a clue as to the size you would need to make pieces and how they will be after firing/shrinking, and also how much water the bare clay would absorb after being fired to glaze temperatures. Simple, straight forward and telling. 
    I understand the difference between the excitement and satisfaction of making. It is immediate and thrilling. Trust me though, it is not as thrilling when you find that your pieces so lovingly created do not hold up or last as long as you would expect them to. Many of us reject the idea of "throw away" society, wishing to make things that last and are cherished for the lifetime of the purchaser.
     
    best,
    Pres
  18. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Benzine in What’s on your workbench?   
    Yeah, throwing this way will wear on you. I still open up large pieces with the pounding method, it takes less energy and makes a really well compressed base. Multiple section pots are tougher on one wheel as you are always shifting the bats. One of the many reasons I miss my old HS classroom! Even though it is quieter and easier to concentrate in the studio, I miss the kids.
     
    best,
    Pres
  19. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Benzine in Handbuilt plates/high fire/glazing question...   
    Littlefairyone, @Min has beat me to the punch, as everything she has stated is spot on.  I struggled for a few years when I first started with a wide range firing body. I did not hold up well, and even though my throwing and construction skills were well developed, my understanding of clay bodies and glazes was negligent. Welcome to the journey!
     
    best,
    Pres
  20. Like
    Pres reacted to Min in Handbuilt plates/high fire/glazing question...   
    If you are firing cone 10 in an electric kiln its going to wear out your elements (and the kiln itself) far quicker than if you fire your stoneware to cone 6. There are wide firing claybodies out there that claim to go from cone 6 - 10 but they will only be mature at the high end of that range. I would suggest using a cone 6 clay, not a wide firing range one, and firing to cone 6. A cone 6 clay fired to maturity is just as suitable for dinnerware as a cone 10 clay. Just be sure and choose a claybody with a low absorption rate, this information is supplied by the manufacturer but it's best to test it yourself also.
  21. Like
    Pres got a reaction from littlefairyone in Handbuilt plates/high fire/glazing question...   
    Welcome to the community @littlefairyone, this is an ambitious project. Let us know what your skill levels are, and what tools you have available. Potters wheel, banding wheel, forms etc. Have you fired pottery, where do you fire, what temps are you talking about as being high fire. 
    Any information you can give us to fill in your profile will be helpful.
     
    best,
    Pres
  22. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in What’s on your workbench?   
    Exactly! It's about due for a cleaning...
  23. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Babs in What’s on your workbench?   
    Yeah, throwing this way will wear on you. I still open up large pieces with the pounding method, it takes less energy and makes a really well compressed base. Multiple section pots are tougher on one wheel as you are always shifting the bats. One of the many reasons I miss my old HS classroom! Even though it is quieter and easier to concentrate in the studio, I miss the kids.
     
    best,
    Pres
  24. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in What’s on your workbench?   
    Making a couple of big planters for our deck.

     
  25. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Violette in Toxic mold in clay?   
    I'm reminded of a tale told to me by a hunter/potter down in Georgia years ago when the conversation of mold came up. He said he had a bird dog that got hurt ran into a pig. on a hunt, and they couldn't find her for a couple of days. Finally found her part buried in a red clay bank along the river. She was doing fine, and the clay and mold had helped her survive. Don't know, but I have heard often that hurt animals will go to water for the water, and the clay.
     
    best,
    Pres
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