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Pres

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  1. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in Repaired Items   
    I would never trust a repair long term, and I don't want poor quality work of mine on the market, so they go into the trash.
  2. Like
    Pres reacted to liambesaw in Repaired Items   
    I'd probably just put them in my own garden.  I don't feel comfortable selling something that is in a repaired condition.
  3. Like
    Pres reacted to Marcia Selsor in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Pres, 
    first what makes me think "I love this" is usually a good comfortable handles and the texture of a glaze. BUT your comment about keeping bugs out o honey reminded me of a honey pot I saw in a old museum in Pontevedra, Spain. There was a ridge in the shoulder of the pot or water creating a mote . It kept ants out o the honey because they wouldn't cross the water barrier. I thought it was brilliant. I loved the ingenuity of the pot.
    Marcia
  4. Like
    Pres reacted to Bill Kielb in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Sounds like that is your new personal standard. You continued to think about it and intentionally improved it. Good for you, credit deserved -  selling well or not.
  5. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Bill Kielb in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Bill, in answer to your query, when I said lots of variation, with different efforts, this took years with gestation time in between, thinking about what would work better. The last one are better, and once you understand the process, and can throw consistently these little thing off the hump, making 20 at a shot is not difficult or majorly time consuming. They certainly have sold well.
     
    best,
    Pres
  6. Like
    Pres reacted to Chilly in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Colour, balance, weight, size. 
    But each of those criteria can/will be different for any given object.  Mugs need to feel strong, cups delicate.  That kind of thing.
  7. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Chilly in Custom orders   
    Custom orders, or one offs, or gallery pieces were where I started. As an art teacher, that is what we taught in most of the other classes. If a student painted, drew, printed, sculpted, or other forms of art, they were one of a kind or custom. 
    I taught art, but then I did teach craft also.  We had a Jewelry and Metalcraft class, and Ceramics classes. In these, we mostly did one of a kind also, biggest restraint here was time. We just did not have the time to make more than one of each type of piece. However, as students moved from Ceramics I to Ceramics II they realized that I had something different in mind for their projects. . . . repetition! Oh how they hated that concept. I made them decide what sort of form they were going to throw, and what it would look like in sketches, and then they had to make a series of them for their project. Ouch! Most of them hated the idea in the beginning, but then by the time they completed a series they began to understand that it was about improving their skills on the wheel. . .If they could only do the form once, was it the best it could be or was it a fluke? Problematic, but got the point thru to them that I was really testing their resolve.
    Myself, I still wonder about custom jobs, and have found that when I had a weak moment and took one on that it usually took double or triple the time that I had to do a regular piece that I usually did. So over the years, I have taken on fewer and fewer of these "one offs". I say this as just yesterday a woman asked if I did "Steeler mugs" hmmmm, I was in a restaurant where they had some of my mugs for sale, and used some for folks looking for a cup of coffee.  She looked at them and I told her no, I did not do "Steeler mugs).  Walked away proud of myself, if a little confused about what a "Steeler mug" would really entail. Then I thought to myself, forget it!
     
     
    best,
    PRes 
  8. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Babs in Custom orders   
    Custom orders, or one offs, or gallery pieces were where I started. As an art teacher, that is what we taught in most of the other classes. If a student painted, drew, printed, sculpted, or other forms of art, they were one of a kind or custom. 
    I taught art, but then I did teach craft also.  We had a Jewelry and Metalcraft class, and Ceramics classes. In these, we mostly did one of a kind also, biggest restraint here was time. We just did not have the time to make more than one of each type of piece. However, as students moved from Ceramics I to Ceramics II they realized that I had something different in mind for their projects. . . . repetition! Oh how they hated that concept. I made them decide what sort of form they were going to throw, and what it would look like in sketches, and then they had to make a series of them for their project. Ouch! Most of them hated the idea in the beginning, but then by the time they completed a series they began to understand that it was about improving their skills on the wheel. . .If they could only do the form once, was it the best it could be or was it a fluke? Problematic, but got the point thru to them that I was really testing their resolve.
    Myself, I still wonder about custom jobs, and have found that when I had a weak moment and took one on that it usually took double or triple the time that I had to do a regular piece that I usually did. So over the years, I have taken on fewer and fewer of these "one offs". I say this as just yesterday a woman asked if I did "Steeler mugs" hmmmm, I was in a restaurant where they had some of my mugs for sale, and used some for folks looking for a cup of coffee.  She looked at them and I told her no, I did not do "Steeler mugs).  Walked away proud of myself, if a little confused about what a "Steeler mug" would really entail. Then I thought to myself, forget it!
     
     
    best,
    PRes 
  9. Like
    Pres reacted to Mark C. in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Its a blend of form and function that appeals to the user . Say in a mug the handle feels right and the form feels right as well as the color is good for that user.Everyone has a different value for this but you know when it all lines up for you. The bowl looks like it should weight as much as it does and the way it feels and works makes it just right.The foot looks and feels right and the balance is great between these aspects .
  10. Like
    Pres reacted to LeeU in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Well, I have to go with "all of the above", as a baseline. Yet those attributes alone won't do it for me as much as when a piece elicits  an inadvertent little internal  gasp...because it's just so gorgeous.  Just don't ask me to define my ideas of gorgeous (or lucious, or sweet, or way cool, etc.). Essentially I just "know it when I see it".  Loving a piece covers a lot of territory, from craftsmanship to color to design, to form to function to whether it can earn its keep, and so much more.  For me it's intuitive, or at times even highly counter-intuitive, evoking  a kind of primal or visceral reaction--or response-- (those not being the same thing)  to the piece. I guess it's a vibe, or an energy, or a perception of something being shared, that just sparks something and connects me to the piece, and sometimes, at least peripherally, with the maker.  
  11. Like
    Pres got a reaction from LeeU in QotW: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?   
    Hulk recently asked in the QotW pool: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?
    Babs replied in the same pool:
    Its feel in my hand .
    Its "balance" when in use.
    How it looks to my eye.
    How it fits in my cupboard.
    And
    Its functionality
    Not taking time to prioritize but bottom one is essential but then....
    I really don't know as I could improve on her answer, other than to add. . . I often try to improve on the functionality of pieces.  As an example my honey jars with the built in honey spoon is an adaptation to keep bugs out of the honey when outside on the deck or elsewhere. I went through several variations before I came up with one that worked well, and was not too great of a time addition to the project. In the end when dealing with this I have to ask was the improvement worth the effort?
    Asking once again: What (in a functional piece) elicits "I love this" for you?
     
    best,
    Pres
  12. Like
    Pres reacted to curt in Cause of these cracks?   
    Yes now that is a cooling dunt.  Very sharp edged, sharp enough to cut you if you run your finger over it with a bit of pressure.  
    The earlier crack does not have anything like this.  The glaze knew the crack was there from the very beginning and simply pulled away from it throughout the firing, just like it was pulling away from ridges elsewhere on the pot (since it is pretty clearly a breaking glaze).
     
  13. Like
    Pres reacted to Babs in Cause of these cracks?   
    Right so if it was a cooling crack the glaze would be right up to the edge of the crack . 
    Thanks Neil.
  14. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in Cause of these cracks?   
    Since the glaze is breaking away from the crack, that crack existed before cooling. You probably flexed the rim at some point when it was too dry to flex and it started the crack. They're often not visible until the glaze firing.
  15. Like
    Pres reacted to Hulk in QotW: What mentor/mentee experiences have others had with regard to throwing?   
    Autodidact, that's a new word for me, thanks!
    Ah'm believing that my throwing is improving some; mainly it is studying others' work (and my own) and observing others (YouTube, mostly) that guides my focus on what to try, what needs improving, etc.
    There are very structured approaches to skill building for some disciplines, and some of these very structured approaches actually work well - recall, for those of you who had the experience, the tedium and pain of a full semester of keyboarding (formerly "typing")! If you came out rocking sixty or more words a minute (even thirty, ha), it was worth it, right? ...especially for those who spend/spent years running a keyboard (like me!). Are there many self taught keyboarders rocking sixty wpm? Compare/contrast the teaching of reading  (there is current analysis of widespread failure in the teaching of reading, btw), where the better structured approaches ease those who struggle up to full speed ahead, and the poorer structured approaches cripple.
    ...and that is my point; for those who are a "natural" the approach/method/strategy may not be as important. For those who struggle, a progressive, structured, flexible/varied approach can make all the difference in terms of achieving mastery, overcoming ineffective (bad) habits, etc. This point comes from my experience in the teaching of and training in swimming, from basic skill only through competition at highest levels and all in-a between. I did not see (and still don't see) much really good swimming instruction, and what is good isn't varied - it's good for a fraction of the audience, at best.
    I'm not expecting to find a throwing mentor, however, will try to keep an open mind!
    Before returning to school, I worked in the painting trade (having turned my back on teaching). I'd learned to spray airless and conventional; I was very good at it, and don't mind saying so, lol! ...wasn't much of a brush and roll guy though, not until I worked with someone who could really go, AND put me on a program to build the skills. There's a lot to handling paint tools that most of the world has no clue about. So I was a good sprayer, but my mentor helped me become a master, and also a good brush and roll as well. I was lucky, eh? ...same guy set up an intervention which lead to me going back to school for CS, changed my life, thanks Ron.
    There are good mentors out there...
    Any road, thanks for the responses!
  16. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Hulk in QotW: What mentor/mentee experiences have others had with regard to throwing?   
    Hulk recently posted in the QotW pool: 
    Still curious what mentor/mentee experiences others have had with regard to throwing?
    Hulk adds to this question by stating: I started at the local JC Ceramic lab, where short demonstration introduces skills required for upcoming assignments, then practice. From there, anyone struggling and/or having questions and/or asking for help would get some one on one or small group. I as (still am) ok with that. I have/am learning by practice, making mistakes, and observing others. Isn't it interesting what we see when observing others - particularly what we didn't see earlier? ...aha!
    For myself (Pres), even though I thoroughly believe that learning to throw is much like learning how to ride a bike; I believe that good practice can be taught, reinforced, and improved upon with the aid of an experienced teacher.
    First to cover my beginning statement, much of life depends on what is referred to as a priori knowledge that is pre existing knowledge to help learn something. However, riding a bike is something that you really don't have a lot of pre learning to help you out. Much the same when working on the wheel. The coordination of using the foot pedal, you can relate to the gas pedal on the car as it makes things go faster. but how do you learn the right pressure to move the clay, to center it, to brace yourself for greater strength/pressure on the clay, or how to gauge the thickness of the walls or the depth of the floor? All of this must be learned by viewing others, practice, practice and. .. . well you get the idea. In the beginning a good demonstrator/ teacher is paramount to understanding the steps in the process, the general body positions, the positions of the arms, hands and finger, and the speed appropriate for the stage of the throwing at hand. Only practice will really allow you to approximate the steps demonstrated and end up successfully.
    My last sentence of the opening paragraph states that a good teacher observing can make good improvement on what is already learned. I have seen many adults taking an adult ceramics class that I taught in the Winters at the HS where I taught, and where I still help out.  Many of these folks are art teachers, or had ceramics in HS, college or both. All too many times they have developed weak habits when throwing, that as an experienced thrower I can help them to correct, improve upon and by doing so allow them to throw larger amounts of clay with greater confidence and experiment with forms they would have never been able to accomplish before even though the desire was there.
     
     So to return to the original question from Hulk: 
    What mentor/mentee experiences have others had with regard to throwing?
    best,
    Pres
  17. Like
    Pres reacted to Mark C. in White Lead   
    I took a 50# unopened bag a few years ago to toxic recycle event locally.
  18. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Rae Reich in Why make functional ware?   
    I have just completed a few mugs for an order, and not  a single one is like the other when you consider form, surface, handle position, and glazed effect. Each is a labor of love that requires the potter to make judgments every step of the way, each leading to a different form and a different fit to the hand, and hopefully a different owner. Love the work.
     
    best,
    Pres
  19. Like
    Pres reacted to neilestrick in Best online resources for ordering clay and supplies?   
    Where are you located? Your closest supplier is generally your best bet unless you want to drive a long way or pay a lot in shipping.
  20. Like
    Pres reacted to LeeU in What’s on your workbench?   
    OK, it's not exactly on the workbench, but it is close by  Greetings of the season. 

  21. Like
    Pres reacted to Denice in QotW: What mentor/mentee experiences have others had with regard to throwing?   
    My high school only had one wheel,   my teacher would pick a boy to teaching throwing too.  He didn't think girls were strong enough to throw.   When I went to college to get a degree in clay  I needed to take three semesters in throwing.   Rick St.John was my first throwing teacher,  he was very patient and drilled the basics into our brain.   My second teacher was more into teaching us how to recycle,  make clay and cleaning,  very little throwing.   My third teacher was a mountain of a man and  would throw a 25 lb block of clay in minutes,   he gave my class a few helpful hints but mostly we followed a throw and cut schedule.   I decided to concentrate on hand building  when I had completed my throwing requirements.   Who knows I may have stayed with throwing if I had a mentor.   I have been rebuilding my brain/hand  connections since I bought a used wheel.   Marc found it for me and convinced me that getting rid of my kick wheel and going electric was the best way to retrain.   He was right,  maybe he is my mentor.    Denice
     
  22. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Hulk in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Some people like to throw the two sections with bottoms, as this makes it easier to lift off the wheel without warping. Myself, if throwing the pedestal section throw it on a bat without a bottom. Another option here is to throw the pedestal with a thicker (slightly) rim, as the piece will be resting on it, makes for a nice base line. Other options are to cut the pedestal with four parabola/hyperbola shapes. I use a thin walled brass pipe, I keep many diameters as hole cutters for all sorts of pieces, often cutting the foot rings for nicer dishwasher drainage.
     
    best,
    Pres
  23. Like
    Pres got a reaction from Hulk in Joining a bowl and pedestal   
    Just out of curiosity and for future reference Jeff, when you attached the pedestal that you described as a bowl, did it have a bottom on it? If so, you may have a bigger problem as the two layers of clay may have an air pocket between that could cause the join to separate in the firing. If you removed the bottom of the pedestal bowl before joining you should be alright.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  24. Like
    Pres reacted to Mark C. in QotW: What mentor/mentee experiences have others had with regard to throwing?   
    I took private lessons in 1969 to learn to throw. It was in Seal Beach Ca. I was in high school and I did it as a suggestion from a friend`as we had wheel access at scholl but no instructor . So we signed up for a night class and threw on 5 different wheels-3 were power and two kick wheels.I do not recall how many months we did this maybe 3-4 months. That same year I bought a wheel for home and within 6 months moved away to collage where I had more training in throwing. I guess about 4 instructors in total for throwing skills. I think it took me about 6-8 years to master it really. I thought I mastered it in 4 yrs  but looking back that was not the case especially handles.
  25. Like
    Pres reacted to liambesaw in QotW: What mentor/mentee experiences have others had with regard to throwing?   
    From what I remember I was introduced to wheel throwing in 3rd grade, and had ceramics class for part of the year for every year from 3rd to 7th grade, and then took 2 years (6 courses) at community college.  But I pretty much forgot everything between then and when I bought my wheel 2 years ago.  Been slowly reteaching myself with the help of you guys here and YouTube since.  I'm fairly autodidact so when I am interested in something i am driven to learn everything about it.  Doesn't always translate to skill though.
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