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GreyBird

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  1. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Babs in Hudson River Clay   
    OK, looks fabulous on the squid vase... and a second Hudson River clay glaze recipe on a few other pieces...  It's been almost a year since I started down this rabbit hole. I think I can lay these to rest now and get back to production! 
     




  2. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Genboomxer in Hudson River Clay   
    OK, looks fabulous on the squid vase... and a second Hudson River clay glaze recipe on a few other pieces...  It's been almost a year since I started down this rabbit hole. I think I can lay these to rest now and get back to production! 
     




  3. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Rae Reich in Hudson River Clay   
    Thanks Rae!!! Yes, I am excited
  4. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Rae Reich in Hudson River Clay   
    Wow! Wow! Wow! Looks wonderful!
  5. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Rae Reich in Hudson River Clay   
    OK, looks fabulous on the squid vase... and a second Hudson River clay glaze recipe on a few other pieces...  It's been almost a year since I started down this rabbit hole. I think I can lay these to rest now and get back to production! 
     




  6. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Rae Reich in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    OK, well it's 7PM and it's only at 400°. I guess this is going to have to wait until tomorrow morning. 
  7. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Hulk in Hudson River Clay   
    OK, looks fabulous on the squid vase... and a second Hudson River clay glaze recipe on a few other pieces...  It's been almost a year since I started down this rabbit hole. I think I can lay these to rest now and get back to production! 
     




  8. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Pieter Mostert in Hudson River Clay   
    OK, looks fabulous on the squid vase... and a second Hudson River clay glaze recipe on a few other pieces...  It's been almost a year since I started down this rabbit hole. I think I can lay these to rest now and get back to production! 
     




  9. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Stephen in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    seeing it sooner is never worth messing up a load over. I've always turned vent off when cracking the lid and removing plugs since it will draw in the room air.
  10. Like
    GreyBird reacted to neilestrick in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    I usually open my lid wide open at 300F.
  11. Like
    GreyBird reacted to LeeU in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    I make myself wait 'til 200. I'm too antsy to risk anything over a few hours of impatience! Mostly this with regard to with New Hampshire winters, which are very cold, for a very long time, and my kiln is on an unheated back porch. 
  12. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Bill Kielb in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    Cracked 250 for me but 300 when  in a hurry. 100 degrees an hour initially but as the difference in temp between inside and outside decreases so does the cool down rate which you already figured out no doubt.
  13. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Pres in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    As Mark says,  200F.!. . . . 500F.? NO, crazing is more prevalent there.
     
    best,
    Pres
  14. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Mark C. in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    Wait until 300 to be safe if its a glaze fire
     
  15. Like
    GreyBird reacted to liambesaw in What temp is it ok to crack the kiln lid?   
    I don't open it until it gets down to 200, only because that's where my kiln basically stays for an entire day if I let it.  I think I've seen that some people crack at 500, but that feels risky to me, I did it once and heard my kiln bricks start to make noise.
  16. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Jack Woodhull in Hudson River Valley clay   
    This has been so helpful, many thanks. 
     
     
  17. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Jack Woodhull in Hudson River Valley clay   
    Yes! Go to Croton Point, park in the big parking lot facing the playground. Walk in past the playground parallel to the river. You'll be walking South. When you come to the end of the field you'll see a path/dirt road that goes up and to the left a bit. Follow that up about 100 yards and you'll see a path on your right which leads down to the river. Now just keep walking South along the river and look to your left. There are many places where trees have fallen over and you can see the clay entangled in their roots. Also where the walls of the river get steep and high you will see clay there. You'll need to check the tide chart and go at low tide. I imagine if Croton Point is not close to you you can probably find the same anywhere that you have the river walls exposed.
    PS... I had the clay analyzed and it came back surprisingly clean  
  18. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Rae Reich in Hudson River Clay   
    Its funny how things work out sometimes... I had posted a photo from a book a while back which pictured a "rust red"platter. I had to take the photo down as it was copyrighted, but the discussion talked a lot about obtaining the red I was looking for that I saw on that platter. I had given up on the idea after many failed tests. And subsequently moved on to develop the Hudson River Clay glaze. The last tile I pictured here in this post showed some really great rust red blooming from the dark glaze. I fired that in my test kiln and matched the heat rise and fall of my large kiln, or so I thought. Until I went to run these two mugs when I noticed that after it reached temp I had the numbers put in wrong and the kiln actually cooled much quicker than it would have in my large kiln. So I fixed the error and let the cups fire with a slow cool of 190° per hour to like 1490 the let it cool the rest naturally. The results were a rust red alternating with shiny black very similar to that elusive platter red I was trying to achieve. I do have a question in all of this... Notice how the clay appears stained reddish from about 1/2" from the bottom up. I'm sure the cups were clean when they went in and not sure where this discoloration is coming from. could it be that the Iron soaked from the glaze through the clay? Maybe if I cool at 200° per hour or let it cool naturally next time it'll have less time to soak through?


  19. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from Rae Reich in Hudson River Clay   
    Hi Babs, I usually throw a large low casserole type shape about 2" or 3 " then remove a circular section of the bottom while it is still on the wheel leaving about a 1/2" foot. When it firms up a bit I just slice it up, stamp each piece for so I can see how it breaks over a pattern and cut holes for hanging in the top with a simple hole cutter. This way they have a little foot to Stand upright in the kiln and they hang nicely on a chord. I have to make more, I'm fresh out! Its also good to make them in Porcelain and stoneware as the glazes act so differently on Porcelain.
  20. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from mousey in Hudson River Clay   
    OK, happy day!  I have finally gotten to running more glaze tests. I am Soooo very excited about the results. Here are three new tests of the Hudson River Clay glaze. I wish the sun was out so you could really see the color variation better. I was able to re create the original that I loved so much with the toasty edges (3rd tile) the first tile is what I'd expect from the clay after seeing what others have done with it. But the second is a whole new happy accident! Whoa, what a feast of reds to black on this one ❤️❤️❤️ Now I'll mix up a large bucket of those two favorites and retest to make sure I'm still on target before I put on any pieces... But I'm pretty sure I've turned a corner on this long road and finally got my own beautiful, unique glazes made from local clay.
     



  21. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Hudson River Clay   
    Maybe 
  22. Like
    GreyBird reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Hudson River Clay   
    Mary said:  “Notice how the clay appears stained reddish from about 1/2" from the bottom up. I'm sure the cups were clean when they went in and not sure where this discoloration is coming from. could it be that the Iron soaked from the glaze through the clay?”
     
    try a thin wash of either baking soda or soda ash on raw bisqued area and see what happens.  I get an orange stain in high fire reduction;  some colleagues have gotten orange flashing at cone 6 oxidation.  
    LT
  23. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from LeeU in Hudson River Valley clay   
    Yes! Go to Croton Point, park in the big parking lot facing the playground. Walk in past the playground parallel to the river. You'll be walking South. When you come to the end of the field you'll see a path/dirt road that goes up and to the left a bit. Follow that up about 100 yards and you'll see a path on your right which leads down to the river. Now just keep walking South along the river and look to your left. There are many places where trees have fallen over and you can see the clay entangled in their roots. Also where the walls of the river get steep and high you will see clay there. You'll need to check the tide chart and go at low tide. I imagine if Croton Point is not close to you you can probably find the same anywhere that you have the river walls exposed.
    PS... I had the clay analyzed and it came back surprisingly clean  
  24. Like
    GreyBird reacted to glazenerd in Hudson River Clay   
    Mary:
    in my testing, I noticed Hudson clay is extremely sensitive to application thickness. Also noticed color shifts when I increased potash content. Soon as I get time, going to slurry down a sample and spray it on.
    Tom
  25. Like
    GreyBird got a reaction from glazenerd in Hudson River Clay   
    Its funny how things work out sometimes... I had posted a photo from a book a while back which pictured a "rust red"platter. I had to take the photo down as it was copyrighted, but the discussion talked a lot about obtaining the red I was looking for that I saw on that platter. I had given up on the idea after many failed tests. And subsequently moved on to develop the Hudson River Clay glaze. The last tile I pictured here in this post showed some really great rust red blooming from the dark glaze. I fired that in my test kiln and matched the heat rise and fall of my large kiln, or so I thought. Until I went to run these two mugs when I noticed that after it reached temp I had the numbers put in wrong and the kiln actually cooled much quicker than it would have in my large kiln. So I fixed the error and let the cups fire with a slow cool of 190° per hour to like 1490 the let it cool the rest naturally. The results were a rust red alternating with shiny black very similar to that elusive platter red I was trying to achieve. I do have a question in all of this... Notice how the clay appears stained reddish from about 1/2" from the bottom up. I'm sure the cups were clean when they went in and not sure where this discoloration is coming from. could it be that the Iron soaked from the glaze through the clay? Maybe if I cool at 200° per hour or let it cool naturally next time it'll have less time to soak through?


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