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Matt Oz

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  1. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Min in Comparing Translucency Of Various Kaolins In A Cone 6 Porcelain Body.   
    I like to do a lot of experiments formulating translucent cone 6 porcelain bodies and wanted to show the difference in translucency of kaolins.
     
    I use this recipe with Grolleg and did not compensate for more refractory kaolin's when mixing up test batches, but from doing various tests in the past these results seem close enough.
     
    Cone 6 Porcelain
    50 Kaolin
    20 Silica 325 mesh
    20 G-200 feldspar
    4 Talc
    1 Veegum T
    5 Wollastonite
    Add:
    2 Frit 3134
    2 Bentonite
     

    For the test tiles I give the percentage of titanium and iron that the kaolins contain, referencing digitalfire.com with each sample because:
    Titanium (TiO2) affects translucency and color.
    Iron (Fe2O3) affects color, and less so translucency.
     
    Tiles are approximately 3/32" thick (2.4 mm), fired in an electric kiln.
     
    Back lit with led bulb.

     
    Left to right:
    New Zealand Halloysite (kaolin)
    TiO2___0.05%  2nd lowest
    Fe2O3_ 0.25%  Lowest
     
    Grolleg
    TiO2___0.03%  Lowest
    Fe2O3_ 0.70%  2nd highest
     
    EPK
    TiO2___0.37%  2nd highest
    Fe2O3_ 0.79%  Highest
     
    #6 Tile
    TiO2___1.40%  Highest
    Fe2O3_ 0.50%  2nd lowest
  2. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Pieter Mostert in Comparing Translucency Of Various Kaolins In A Cone 6 Porcelain Body.   
    I like to do a lot of experiments formulating translucent cone 6 porcelain bodies and wanted to show the difference in translucency of kaolins.
     
    I use this recipe with Grolleg and did not compensate for more refractory kaolin's when mixing up test batches, but from doing various tests in the past these results seem close enough.
     
    Cone 6 Porcelain
    50 Kaolin
    20 Silica 325 mesh
    20 G-200 feldspar
    4 Talc
    1 Veegum T
    5 Wollastonite
    Add:
    2 Frit 3134
    2 Bentonite
     

    For the test tiles I give the percentage of titanium and iron that the kaolins contain, referencing digitalfire.com with each sample because:
    Titanium (TiO2) affects translucency and color.
    Iron (Fe2O3) affects color, and less so translucency.
     
    Tiles are approximately 3/32" thick (2.4 mm), fired in an electric kiln.
     
    Back lit with led bulb.

     
    Left to right:
    New Zealand Halloysite (kaolin)
    TiO2___0.05%  2nd lowest
    Fe2O3_ 0.25%  Lowest
     
    Grolleg
    TiO2___0.03%  Lowest
    Fe2O3_ 0.70%  2nd highest
     
    EPK
    TiO2___0.37%  2nd highest
    Fe2O3_ 0.79%  Highest
     
    #6 Tile
    TiO2___1.40%  Highest
    Fe2O3_ 0.50%  2nd lowest
  3. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from bciskepottery in Comparing Translucency Of Various Kaolins In A Cone 6 Porcelain Body.   
    I like to do a lot of experiments formulating translucent cone 6 porcelain bodies and wanted to show the difference in translucency of kaolins.
     
    I use this recipe with Grolleg and did not compensate for more refractory kaolin's when mixing up test batches, but from doing various tests in the past these results seem close enough.
     
    Cone 6 Porcelain
    50 Kaolin
    20 Silica 325 mesh
    20 G-200 feldspar
    4 Talc
    1 Veegum T
    5 Wollastonite
    Add:
    2 Frit 3134
    2 Bentonite
     

    For the test tiles I give the percentage of titanium and iron that the kaolins contain, referencing digitalfire.com with each sample because:
    Titanium (TiO2) affects translucency and color.
    Iron (Fe2O3) affects color, and less so translucency.
     
    Tiles are approximately 3/32" thick (2.4 mm), fired in an electric kiln.
     
    Back lit with led bulb.

     
    Left to right:
    New Zealand Halloysite (kaolin)
    TiO2___0.05%  2nd lowest
    Fe2O3_ 0.25%  Lowest
     
    Grolleg
    TiO2___0.03%  Lowest
    Fe2O3_ 0.70%  2nd highest
     
    EPK
    TiO2___0.37%  2nd highest
    Fe2O3_ 0.79%  Highest
     
    #6 Tile
    TiO2___1.40%  Highest
    Fe2O3_ 0.50%  2nd lowest
  4. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Patat in Avatar Issues   
    I thought the movie, while not perfect, was entertaining.
  5. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Babs in Water And Different Clay Bodies   
    A watched pot never dries
  6. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from bciskepottery in Water And Different Clay Bodies   
    A watched pot never dries
  7. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Pam S in Potter's Choice Cone Palladium Pc-4 5-6 Glaze   
    Here is a post from an AMACO engineer on this subject.
    and here is the thread it is from....Anyone Use Amaco Potters Choice Saturation Metallic Or Gold?
     
  8. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Tyler Miller in Why Do The Fluxing Molecules Only Have One Oxygen Atom   
    When two elements love each other very much, they come together to form a compound.
     
    Sorry, I'm not helping.
  9. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Chris Campbell in Translucent Porcelain Hidden Pattern Experiment.   
    I experimented with an easy way to create a simple pattern with colored porcelain that also creates a more complex one that only emerges when backlit, I used coils of porcelain colored with Mason stains and the opacifier Zircopax.
    Haven’t done anything with it yet, other than make test tiles, and I’m sure there have been lots of creative techniques used out there to do similar.
     
    I'm using a glassy porcelain that melts and slumps to much to use for most projects, if anybody tries this you should get good results with one of New Zealand kaolin based porcelains.
     
    Praseodymium stain for yellow.
    Wedgewood for blue.
    Zircopax for white.
     
    Test tiles are about 3/32" thick roughly an inch wide
    The photos are of a tile lit from the front, then backlit with a led bulb.
     

    I twisted two coils together, one with a small amount of blue stain the other uncolored porcelain, then Inlaid them into a slab of lighter blue making a simple twist pattern, when lit from behind a more complex pattern appears.
     
     

    Here is a pale blue and pale yellow twisted, where the two colors overlap it creates green when lit, doesn’t stand out much though.
     

    This one is a white coil twisted with a uncolored porcelain coil then inlaid in white, so you can only see half the pattern when not backlit.
     
    Hope you found these interesting.
  10. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Marcia Selsor in Translucent Porcelain Hidden Pattern Experiment.   
    I experimented with an easy way to create a simple pattern with colored porcelain that also creates a more complex one that only emerges when backlit, I used coils of porcelain colored with Mason stains and the opacifier Zircopax.
    Haven’t done anything with it yet, other than make test tiles, and I’m sure there have been lots of creative techniques used out there to do similar.
     
    I'm using a glassy porcelain that melts and slumps to much to use for most projects, if anybody tries this you should get good results with one of New Zealand kaolin based porcelains.
     
    Praseodymium stain for yellow.
    Wedgewood for blue.
    Zircopax for white.
     
    Test tiles are about 3/32" thick roughly an inch wide
    The photos are of a tile lit from the front, then backlit with a led bulb.
     

    I twisted two coils together, one with a small amount of blue stain the other uncolored porcelain, then Inlaid them into a slab of lighter blue making a simple twist pattern, when lit from behind a more complex pattern appears.
     
     

    Here is a pale blue and pale yellow twisted, where the two colors overlap it creates green when lit, doesn’t stand out much though.
     

    This one is a white coil twisted with a uncolored porcelain coil then inlaid in white, so you can only see half the pattern when not backlit.
     
    Hope you found these interesting.
  11. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Tim Allen in Bubble Glaze Experiment With Close Ups.   
    The black clay I used was a porcelain with black mason stain. These were a single fire, but I have used it on bisque ware and there are still bubbles if it is thick.
     
    Firing schedule:
    I have a slow warm up at the beginning but after that its just
    300 degF/hr to 1980
    110 degF/hr to 2180 or whatever bends cone 6
    No slow cool or hold.
     
    Here is one more of tile one through a magnifying glass, shows ever-smaller bubbles. Now I have to go fire up the Electron microscope,  where did I put that thing?

  12. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Babs in Bubble Glaze Experiment With Close Ups.   
    The black clay I used was a porcelain with black mason stain. These were a single fire, but I have used it on bisque ware and there are still bubbles if it is thick.
     
    Firing schedule:
    I have a slow warm up at the beginning but after that its just
    300 degF/hr to 1980
    110 degF/hr to 2180 or whatever bends cone 6
    No slow cool or hold.
     
    Here is one more of tile one through a magnifying glass, shows ever-smaller bubbles. Now I have to go fire up the Electron microscope,  where did I put that thing?

  13. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Joy pots in Bubble Glaze Experiment With Close Ups.   
    A while ago I did some experiments with a cone 6 clear in a electric kiln that has lots of tiny bubbles in it when applied thicker, I made some small tiles (about 1 1/8" square) out of black clay so the bubbles would have good contrast and because they're fired horizontal I got a nice even spread of bubbles.
    Some tests have additions of Mason stain.

    The first tile has white clay inlaid in the black clay with small pieces of a glassy porcelain I have that were placed on top of the glaze prior to firing.
    Tile three has 1% Mazerine stain added to the clear with a streak of white glaze on top and a ball of porcelain.
    The last one is 4% Praseodymium with porcelain additions.
     
    Close ups:
     
    Tile one

     
    Tile one closer

     
    Tile three

     
    The glaze is:
     
    25 3134
    15 Custer
    20 Kaolin
    20 Silica
    20 Wollastonite
     
    Not the most compatible of glazes but bubbly. I don't remember exactly how thick the clear was but at least 4 coats and if applied too thick the glaze becomes too cloudy.
    I haven’t experimented with this enough to know if it's useful or practical to do it this way, but found it interesting.
  14. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Tyler Miller in Bubble Glaze Experiment With Close Ups.   
    A while ago I did some experiments with a cone 6 clear in a electric kiln that has lots of tiny bubbles in it when applied thicker, I made some small tiles (about 1 1/8" square) out of black clay so the bubbles would have good contrast and because they're fired horizontal I got a nice even spread of bubbles.
    Some tests have additions of Mason stain.

    The first tile has white clay inlaid in the black clay with small pieces of a glassy porcelain I have that were placed on top of the glaze prior to firing.
    Tile three has 1% Mazerine stain added to the clear with a streak of white glaze on top and a ball of porcelain.
    The last one is 4% Praseodymium with porcelain additions.
     
    Close ups:
     
    Tile one

     
    Tile one closer

     
    Tile three

     
    The glaze is:
     
    25 3134
    15 Custer
    20 Kaolin
    20 Silica
    20 Wollastonite
     
    Not the most compatible of glazes but bubbly. I don't remember exactly how thick the clear was but at least 4 coats and if applied too thick the glaze becomes too cloudy.
    I haven’t experimented with this enough to know if it's useful or practical to do it this way, but found it interesting.
  15. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from High Bridge Pottery in Bubble Glaze Experiment With Close Ups.   
    A while ago I did some experiments with a cone 6 clear in a electric kiln that has lots of tiny bubbles in it when applied thicker, I made some small tiles (about 1 1/8" square) out of black clay so the bubbles would have good contrast and because they're fired horizontal I got a nice even spread of bubbles.
    Some tests have additions of Mason stain.

    The first tile has white clay inlaid in the black clay with small pieces of a glassy porcelain I have that were placed on top of the glaze prior to firing.
    Tile three has 1% Mazerine stain added to the clear with a streak of white glaze on top and a ball of porcelain.
    The last one is 4% Praseodymium with porcelain additions.
     
    Close ups:
     
    Tile one

     
    Tile one closer

     
    Tile three

     
    The glaze is:
     
    25 3134
    15 Custer
    20 Kaolin
    20 Silica
    20 Wollastonite
     
    Not the most compatible of glazes but bubbly. I don't remember exactly how thick the clear was but at least 4 coats and if applied too thick the glaze becomes too cloudy.
    I haven’t experimented with this enough to know if it's useful or practical to do it this way, but found it interesting.
  16. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Juli Long in Bubble Glaze Experiment With Close Ups.   
    A while ago I did some experiments with a cone 6 clear in a electric kiln that has lots of tiny bubbles in it when applied thicker, I made some small tiles (about 1 1/8" square) out of black clay so the bubbles would have good contrast and because they're fired horizontal I got a nice even spread of bubbles.
    Some tests have additions of Mason stain.

    The first tile has white clay inlaid in the black clay with small pieces of a glassy porcelain I have that were placed on top of the glaze prior to firing.
    Tile three has 1% Mazerine stain added to the clear with a streak of white glaze on top and a ball of porcelain.
    The last one is 4% Praseodymium with porcelain additions.
     
    Close ups:
     
    Tile one

     
    Tile one closer

     
    Tile three

     
    The glaze is:
     
    25 3134
    15 Custer
    20 Kaolin
    20 Silica
    20 Wollastonite
     
    Not the most compatible of glazes but bubbly. I don't remember exactly how thick the clear was but at least 4 coats and if applied too thick the glaze becomes too cloudy.
    I haven’t experimented with this enough to know if it's useful or practical to do it this way, but found it interesting.
  17. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Patsu in Craft Is Good; Crafter Is Not -- Cerf+ Survey Results   
    Crafter has never bothered me, and you can call me what ever you want as long as you buy something from me.
  18. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Tyler Miller in Craft Is Good; Crafter Is Not -- Cerf+ Survey Results   
    Crafter has never bothered me, and you can call me what ever you want as long as you buy something from me.
  19. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from Norm Stuart in Underglaze, Colored Slips, Compatible?   
    Laguna  did make a substitute called Luguna Borate but they discontinued it.
    Short PDF with announcement. http://www.lagunaclay.com/msds/pdf/3rawmat/adry/lagborate.pdf
    So that explains all the confusion.
  20. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from trina in Stoneware Continually "pings" Even After A Day...   
    This reminds me, when my mother was a little girl growing up in the Detroit area, Her older sister would take her to hockey games, coming out of the arena one night she all of a sudden got caught up in a large crowd and didn't know what was going on, until she looked up at who was walking beside her Mr. Hockey himself Gordie Howe. Of course he was very nice about the hole thing.
  21. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from OffCenter in COOL ICE - CONE 6 - PORCELAIN CLAY   
    The short answer is the purity of the kaolin, all the clay bodies discussed in this topic are using a very pure New Zealand kaolin (technically a halloysite), that explains the NZ in NZ6.
  22. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from clay lover in Forum's New Look & My Lost Gallery   
    Okay I clicked the little x under the like this button and it gives you options to ignore people.  No I'm not referring to anyone in particular, or am I?

     

     

    When I hit the like button it doesn’t seem to show in public anymore, I thought it was useful sometimes to see popular answers.

  23. Like
    Matt Oz reacted to Marcia Selsor in Forum's New Look & My Lost Gallery   
    The gallery new look and organization is great. It made me put up a new album. I have to reset my type because I can hardly see this one.
    Nice work administrators! I think it was an ambitious undertaking.
     
    Marcia
  24. Like
    Matt Oz reacted to neilestrick in Odd Old Paragon : Help me Arnold Howard !   
    The control box, as you mentioned, should have its own protection that will shut down the whole system long before anything will have a chance to fry. Besides, the kiln elements themselves are, virtually, a large fuse themself, so it'll be difficult to image any kiln defect that could lead to more problem with a 50A breaker vs. 30A on a 50A line. 
     
    But as I stated above, if this is a DEDICATED line, putting a 30 A breaker makes perfect sense.
     
     
    The control box on most kilns is not fused, only the controller itself, which is running on low voltage from a transformer. On most kilns, the power cord, relays, feeder wires, etc. all rely on the breaker to prevent overloads. A 50 amp surge to a 30 amp cord is not a good thing. Running double the rated amperage through any type of wire is dangerous.
     
    All 208/240/440 volt lines are required by code to be dedicated lines. It's not that it makes perfect sense to put appliances on the correct breaker, it's the law. You cannot tell people that they can wire their kiln to whatever huge breaker they want because 'the elemnts are essentially a fuse'. It's against code and not safe. If we're going to help people here, we need to be telling them the correct, legal, safe way to do it.
  25. Like
    Matt Oz got a reaction from OffCenter in Pottery for Everyman   
    I live in Michigan and speak fluent Canadian because I grew up on: Mr. Dressup, The Friendly Giant and the Beachcombers (Channel 9), I often trade beaver pelts, duct tape and the occasional pasty with them. -not pastie
     
    Has this topic gone askew....By the way, type askew into the Google homepage and watch what happens.
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