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dazzlepottery

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About dazzlepottery

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  • Birthday 10/27/1990

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    http://www.danabechert.com

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    Lancaster, PA

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  1. It’s possible, I do think that may be the issue with some of the marks here. Some are obviously fingerprints. the ones that are a mystery seem to have come from areas that rapidly dried during a draft when they were wet.
  2. I’m wiping the rims of pieces after glazing the inside with clear. So the water bucket gets some clear glaze in it. I use our tap water in Pennsylvania
  3. Actually this last time for most of these teal pieces I made the slip from clay for the first time. Including that low bowl with the haze. I didn’t have enough of my throwing water to mix up the teal. The two vases with the blotches were made the old way ( letting the solids settle and just pouring off the suspended liquid) but the rest were made with crushed clay scraps. It’s not just a random bucket of wash water, I am careful to only use water from a pure porcelain throwing session, pour into another bucket to settle further. Then reduce what stays suspended. Just comparin
  4. Yes I make my own slip, out of suspended clay from my throwing water, reduced and mason stains. The pots are leather hard when I apply slip, I let it set up between coats so it doesn’t remove the last layer. i bisque to cone 06. the water often has a layer of glaze in the bottom after wiping the bisque. Perhaps I just need to change water more often. the coats of slip are very even, as are the walls and surface of the pots. I’ve been making pots this way for almost 10 years, thousands so far, and the problem has only just begun to present itself. it’s th
  5. It has been happening the last few rounds of firings. Not sure if it Corresponds to a new batch of clay, it’s possible. This is standards 365 English cone 6porcelain. I’ve been using this claybody for many years. the worst time was once when I tried rinsing bisqued pieces. I ran the water from the rim to the base and let dry overnight. The pieces weren’t glazed on the outside. The bottom of those pieces were horribly streaked. also lately when I’m cleaning up clear glaze on the outside of pieces with a wet sponge, those areas tend to have sponge mark streaking. I assumed th
  6. Wow I think you may be on to something. I used to do a 30 minute soak in all my glaze firings. I don’t remember when I heard that would be a good idea but someone scolded me once saying I’m probably over firing. So I stopped. It seems that loosely corresponds to the time this issue started. It may be that was what I needed to vitrify my pieces. I always pack very densely. And i never use witness cones since I switched to a computer kiln. Elements are getting pretty old so it’s very possible it’s not getting quite up to temperature. the slip I use is more like a terra sig. does
  7. Thanks for the replies. I may try a gloss medium (on a less important piece first). I’m afraid to try to glaze and refire though I may try that too. still a mystery to me why especially the random splotches would occur. The walls are even thickness and I don’t trim the large vases at all. Almost seems like an issue during firing. It’s only been happening for the last 6 mos or so and nothing in my process or slip mixing has changed.
  8. Hi there Ive been having an issue with some areas of my slip coated pieces getting lighter and hazy when fired. I apply slip with the piece rotating on the wheel using a wide brush and several coats. This is what’s happening on the low bowl shape. The bottom gets kind of lighter hazy scuffed . At first I thought it was from rinsing a bisqued piece and perhaps dust got on the bottom so I never rinsed again but it’s still happening. Any thoughts? this last firing I have this new lighter area issue on the larger vases. I really don’t know what that could be from. A few guesses are
  9. To clarify, I don't think the breaker was the issue at first. My husband wired this for me, I don't know exactly what he had to change to solve this issue, part of the wire needed to hook into the bottom of the breaker rather than to top from what it looked like? Seems it was getting just enough power to display the temperature but not enough to actually start the firing. I had been firing this kiln at our last house for the past six years on a 50 breaker (not knowing it was undersized) so I went ahead and fired the bisque with the undersized breaker-which was new (I know, lazy and danger
  10. Thanks everyone! At first we had a mix up with the wiring. Also changed out the breakers to 60 and that did the trick. First bisque successfully completed in the new studio!
  11. Hi, I'm having an issue with my Skutt 1227 kiln. I've had the kiln for years, haven't had many issues. Recently I moved and had my new studio wired to work the kiln. We added a 50amp breaker, (kiln requires 49). When we finished, the kiln flashed with its temperature like always, indicating it has power. Today I loaded a bisque firing, and went to start it. Immediately when the kiln tried to make the first heating, error code ErrP showed up and the display flashed between the temperature and the error code. According to Skutt ErrP means: A continuous Err P indicates a short t
  12. Hi There, I make work that is sgraffito carved, most of which I try to do when the piece is leather hard but sometimes it's a little drier than I'd like. I am very concerned about silicosis. In the last couple of years, I have been wearing my respirator when I carve. It's a msr mask with p100 filters. Recently I met another sgraffito artist who suggested that unless I am replacing those cartridges VERY regularly (she suggested weekly or more) then it traps dust and does more harm than good. So she has switched to a regular dust mask that she replaces daily. I can't imagine that is true bu
  13. I'm still in my first iteration of my art fair display but I'm pretty pleased with it so far. I have setup that all folds down and fits into a Prius V (their version of a wagon) with the 10" stick lumber pieces on a roof rack. I use the handheld shrink wrap to keep the long pieces tidy for transport. I must look like a mess when I'm setting up because people always approach me, surprised, afterward and say "wow it really came together in the end." At first I was shocked by the price of renting pipe and drape and even more so by the idea of buying a setup, so after ground scoring 4 10'
  14. I am relatively new the the craft fair game but I sell a good bit of large work. I've been selling online internationally and to decorators for a few years and they normally buy what I call the "large statement pieces." One thing I've noticed is that at some shows, like the higher quality fine craft shows, having the large work helps to draw in clients and sell the smaller pieces, ($95 for a mug doesn't seem so bad when the vase you really want is $1100). But at other shows, like the ones with younger crowds where people are expecting a deal, I think having the nice work is actually hurti
  15. Thanks everybody. I will try a bisque soak. The ones that became more bloated were usually stacked deeply in the bisque firing, which confused me because some things came out fine and some were horribly bloated! Thanks again for the info.
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