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Spencer

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  1. One of the reasons I never had two different firing clays in the ceramics studio. I was often "donated" clay by other schools or teachers mostly earthenwares. These I sent on to schools that I knew were using the lower firing clays. It always seemed that no matter how I would try to keep them separated they would get mixed up or used-so I only kept one firing temp around after the first few years. In my own studio I use a white and a brown that are same firing characteristics. It makes it easier to make slips to mix, and do inlays etc when I wish to. Thanks again for the ideas everyone. Take care
  2. Thanks to everyone, clearly found a great source here for ideas and advice. Take it easy
  3. You said you fired a cone 06 clay at cone 06 and feared it would melt?? Is your post correct? Cone 06 is lower than Cone 6 and the cone they clay should have been fired at, so the clay would not "melt" at that cone/temperature. However, it probably would melt at Cone 6 if it is a cone 06 clay body. Unless somebody else has an idea, I think this may be lost pieces and a learning experience. Thanks a lot for the help. Just to clarify, the manufacturer told me that due to the fact it was Cone 6 glaze, that if I fired the clay body that was Cone 06 that it would melt which I understand. However, I was wondering if fired a second time, but this time at Cone 6, would it still melt or would it further activate the glaze. I am sure it is a lost situation, but had to research it as I am sure an accident like this will happen again. Thanks again Do not fire the 06 clay to 6! Some clays have a wide firing range, but you are probably dealing with a clay that is 06 earthenware, where the usual limit is about 2000F. When you are above 2000 you are into stoneware ranges and the clay is made to handle the higher temp. If you were to fire the clay body you have, no matter how many times fired to 06, in a cone 6 firing you would end up with bloated-slumped pots if really lucky, but probably a kiln full of melted glass that would require $$$ to repair the kiln. The cone 6 glaze has nothing to do with the way the clay body will handle the firing. Best bet if they have not been fired is to wash them off, and glaze with 06 glazes. You may even be able to scrape off the glaze if they have been fired at 06-otherwise chalk it up to a lesson of experience. Thanks a ton. I will make sure I store the 06 clay and the 6 clay in different cupboards from now on!! Spence
  4. You said you fired a cone 06 clay at cone 06 and feared it would melt?? Is your post correct? Cone 06 is lower than Cone 6 and the cone they clay should have been fired at, so the clay would not "melt" at that cone/temperature. However, it probably would melt at Cone 6 if it is a cone 06 clay body. Unless somebody else has an idea, I think this may be lost pieces and a learning experience. Thanks a lot for the help. Just to clarify, the manufacturer told me that due to the fact it was Cone 6 glaze, that if I fired the clay body that was Cone 06 that it would melt which I understand. However, I was wondering if fired a second time, but this time at Cone 6, would it still melt or would it further activate the glaze. I am sure it is a lost situation, but had to research it as I am sure an accident like this will happen again. Thanks again
  5. Stumbled upon this forum searching for an answer to a mistake made. Some of my students used the wrong clay, Cone 06 and then glazed it with Cone 6 glaze. I fired it at Cone 06 in fear of it melting. It of course looks horrible and I was wondering what would happen if I fired the same pottery a second time but this time at Cone 6. I am assuming it would still deform and melt, but I thought I would check with people who have more experience then I do. Thanks for your time Spence
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