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pritchpat

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About pritchpat

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    Advanced Member
  • Birthday 03/15/1953

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  • Location
    Turkey

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  1. Hi Natalie, I started with a hand building class once a week when I was 60 and found I learned masses about a subject that I knew absolutely nothing about. It showed me that I wanted to continue to learn more, but I really wanted to learn to throw. It looks easy right!!!! So don't let age even be an issue. Eventually I set up a small shed in my garden with an electric kiln, wheel, and tried to learn how to throw. I really struggled as I had no-one to ask for advice about how to actually do this. Things like, which was the best clay, which glazes worked well with which clays. In fact absolutely everything. Unfortunately living here in Turkey I didn't have the luxury of other classes to attend and suppliers of all those wonderful products that everyone here recommends. Don't even get me started on being able to get my hands on items for making my own glazes. Because normally everything you see on Youtube etc is being performed by someone that is actually good they make it look effortless. Youtube and places like these forums are great but they don't allow you to feel that clay under your fingers and ask what am I doing wrong? How can I do it better? So my advice to you would be give classes a go, gain as much information as you can. It will be money well spent, and I bet you will soon know if you want to go to the expense of setting up your own work space. Good luck with what ever you decide. I'm sure you will love it.
  2. Hi I started a topic on making a tagine somewhile ago with regard to which clay was the best for this project. Since then I have made a couple and successfully used one of these (the second has yet to be fired) I used a red earthenware clay fired 1040. I live in Turkey so I can't really recommend a supplier. I've only used the tagine in the oven so can't say if it would work with a diffuser but I reckon it would stand it. Putting the tagine into a cold oven and heat to around 180 then after time reduce to around 150 for about an hour and half worked wonderfully for me.
  3. Take a look at this project sheet gives a similar effect and will walk you through the process. I used it on some of my pots and loved the effect whilst I learned a lot about how the different glaze applications interacted. https://www.maycocolors.com/index.php/projects-home/application-techniques/115-projects/application-techniques/964-matte-elegance Good luck
  4. Thanks I'm going to play around with a few pieces to see what effects I can achieve. Luckily I'm not having to make things on a commercial basis so can mess around to my hearts content
  5. Thank you for your reply and Joseph F's previous video link. I wasn't aware that this was a Mayco video. I have watched this particular video on several occasions very carefully (plus many others ) and I understand the concept, but at the end of this video it recommends dipping in a clear glaze hence my original question. As you say this is too simple for such a confusion so in future I will just go ahead and test. Regards from one old lady to another x In the video, they are mixing underglazes, not glazes; that is why they recommend the clear glaze. And, unless you googled the product number in one of the early slides, you would not have picked up on that . . . so much for clarity in instructions. Hi Ya, Yes I realized on this particular video that was what the lady was doing, I think from memory those codes are Duncan, but having trawled the inter web I can't seem to find one that seems to be using a gloss glaze and for the life of me I can't find one from Mayco. It's not life changing I'll just give them a go and see what happens after all it's just clay! Right? Best Regards P
  6. Thank you for your reply and Joseph F's previous video link. I wasn't aware that this was a Mayco video. I have watched this particular video on several occasions very carefully (plus many others ) and I understand the concept, but at the end of this video it recommends dipping in a clear glaze hence my original question. As you say this is too simple for such a confusion so in future I will just go ahead and test. Regards from one old lady to another x
  7. Ha if only there was a little fairy that could wave it's magic wand and make me know all there is to know about this as you say bloody field.
  8. Thanks I will try and track down the Mayco video. I've watched a few YouTube videos but not really getting what glaze/paint they're using. If all fails I'll give it a go and see what happens.
  9. Hi Folks I'm hoping for a bit of advice. I would like to have a stab at bubble glazing a few pieces and just need to know if I can use commercial glazes, Mayco in particular. I was going to base coat with say white, blow another colour on top then fire, but is it necessary to clear glaze over the top as both would already produce a gloss finish if fired normally. Thanks in anticipation.
  10. Thanks it's so good not to have the sound effects that went on before, just annoyed at myself for not paying attention to the instructions for the clay. I must have been a bloke in a previous life don't read instructions haha!
  11. Update to my glaze issues. I've re-fired to cone 5, now the jug that leaked like a sieve holds water there is still a little crazing on the section with the Elements glaze, but none of the pinging and cracking noises that went on after first firing. This has taught me something regarding the application of Elements so really happy that I risked a re-fire. P
  12. I've been looking at Bath Potters but from memory they say that they tend to warp! so was a little put off. I thought I might pick the brains of Vinegar Hill to see what they suggest. We have lots of woodshops that could make the bats but having never even see one in real life I just want to experience them before getting them made. Also hate the thought of having to drill bat pin holes in my lovely wheel, but needs must as they say so I'm sure once I get an understanding of them I will be a brave soldier and get on with it. I need to learn to throw a lot better before I start worrying about bats haha. We know the area quite well as family live in the New Forest so looking forward to getting out and about on free days, but my reason for coming back to UK is for the course YouTube is great for the theory but I just need to actually feel the clay watch and learn from the experts. Can't wait. Obviously my husband is looking forward to getting some good old English beer down his neck. Regards P I plan to take a small sample of the clays that are available here to compare with UK's I bet it's nothing like as good.
  13. You're right getting the right clay will be the trickiest for me, I've got a slab roller so even thickness shouldn't cause a problem. Living here in Turkey I'm struggling to get to grips with the different clays. My local instructor only used the cheapest of clays and didn't have any experience with the more expensive ones. Plus the clays available are limited. Also due to my inexperience I'm probably not ordering the most effective clays, but I'm learning slowly and as I have all the time in the world if something doesn't work I move on and try again. By the way I've just read your profile and you are obviously my twin same birthdate and year haha!
  14. That's exactly what I was thinking. Pritchpat, if you don't want to throw, you might consider slab building the pot instead. Or even coiling it on the wheel and evening it out. Actually slab building and coil was the way I was going to go I love using slab and plonking (not a technical word!) it on something as a mold. In fact the Spanish pot I mentioned in an earlier post would make about the right shape.
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