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No Longer Member

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  1. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Teala62 in Narrowed It Down To A Couple Wheels?   
    Pres is spot on abut that. My wife is short (5'2") and some wheels just don't fit her due to deck width and wheel head placement therein. So far I think Pacifica has the narrowest deck and IMO, the best wheel head placement (although I can't see the sides of the pot that well with me directly over it). I know it looks a lot like a Brent but I can feel a definite difference between the two.
     
    If you can, see if you can sit at a few wheels first (even if just on craigslist ads) but be mindful of what you are sitting on as well, as that will make a huge difference in how a particular wheel feels to you as far as fit when comparing. For me it took some trial and error to figure out what works best for a stool, which in my case is an old wooden chair we've had forever.
     
    Picking out a first wheel that's "right" for you is as difficult as a beginner would-be guitarist picking out a guitar. It's hard to figure out what works for you when you don't know how to make the thing work. Just break it down into simple things.
     
    Are your legs spread too far or not enough?
     
    Do you have to reach out further or closer than you'd like to?
     
    Is the wheel head or deck  too high or too low (try different seating arrangement first to see)
     
    Are you hunched over too far or not enough?
     
    Could you stay in that position for a while?
     
    Where would your water bucket be and how easy would it be to reach it?
     
    See what you can do to fix the things that bug you about sitting at a particular wheel before writing it off. Selecting a wheel  is (hopefully) a long term commitment. Making the wrong choice will determine whether it will be long term or not. You wouldn't run out and marry someone from the first craigslist personal ad that was in your area/range, so don't do it with a wheel either. Take your time and see what's out there. I know they look all the same but they aren't; even the one's that look almost identical.
  2. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in L&l Vs Skutt   
    This is absolutely 100% true. Skutt elements put more heat directly into the firing chamber as Skutt elements are usually hanging out of their broken brick grooves drooping down into the kiln and onto the brick and element below it.
     
     
    I own 5 or 6 Skutts and there is no comparison, L&L all the way; especially if we're talking the same money.
  3. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from kjharris in Kiln And Miscellaneous Help   
    IMHO, without even looking (as I've seen stuff like this 1000 times). I'd charge $500 to haul all that crap off.
  4. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from glazenerd in Mixing Pugmills   
    It doesn't use a "screen" in the sense that you think. It has a stainless steel metal disk with holes drilled in it about 3/16" that the clay has to push through; (think meat grinder). I've used both a PP and Bailey (dual auger) in a professional capacity and I prefer a Bailey dual auger machine. Bailey's dual auger design is much better at de-airing as it de-airs AFTER the clay passed through the "screen" holes allowing a more thorough process. The "screen" doesn't need to be clean unless you mulch a bunch of tools and/or bisque that got thrown in by mistake (and it would have to be a lot!)
     
    Single auger machines need to be loaded to about 85-90% to get them to work. The dual auger machines can pug a much smaller batch than it's full capacity. You also have to be more careful when adding water to a single auger machine as too much too fast and the batch will just spin.
     
    The only thing I don't like about the Bailey is the that the longer barrel holds a lot of "old" clay that needs to be considered when pugging if swapping b/w high and low fire clays.
     
    Both are good machines; one is a VW, the other a BMW.
  5. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in Qotw: What Movie Best Describes Your Adventures In Clay: And Why?   
    "Vanishing Point" or "Apocalypse Now"...
     
     
     
    ...the horror....the horror....  
  6. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from terrim8 in Qotw: What Movie Best Describes Your Adventures In Clay: And Why?   
    "Vanishing Point" or "Apocalypse Now"...
     
     
     
    ...the horror....the horror....  
  7. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from nancylee in How Much To Make?   
    If a spoon rest is $5 then I would go up $10 across the board.
     
     
    But knowing me, I would even go up $10 on the board too....
  8. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from LeeU in Small Rock Crusher   
    Holds beer in other hand and needed to lean against something...
  9. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from LeeU in Qotw: Are You Afraid Of The White Gold?   
    No, but I find thoughts of Vanilla Ice very disturbing!
  10. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Magnolia Mud Research in S-Crack   
    I have a theory which seems to have some base in physics as of the origin of too many S cracks, however; I shall not disclose this thought as it defies "the way". Some folks can get pretty testy when you defy their beliefs and knowledge base, especially when they paid a lot of money for it.
  11. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Stephen in The Price Of Art   
    That aint nuthin', art cost me the rest of my life in poverty!
  12. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Broken Ceramic Element Holders   
    Marcia, how bad is it cracked, are you having problems with dusting?
     
    What this video, it may make you feel better. If anyone knows anything about making bricks that break ....it's these guys
     

  13. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from glazenerd in New Lid?   
    Flip lid over, then fire. No more oil problems.
  14. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from LeeU in To Me   
    Me; I'm just tryin' to figure out if it's me or the dog who has gas.....
  15. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Rae Reich in Supplies To Buy When Buying A First Wheel?   
    I was working on something once that tied up one hand and  told my old boss, "I can't see with my glove on, pull it off for me". You should have seen the look on his face.
     
    Don't worry about pulling up, concentrate on centering. Try hands/arms at 4 and 7 with 1 pound , touch fingertips (lock some if you can) and squeeze the clay centered. (Push in with hands/palms on same plane as arms)
     
    Empty your mind of everything you know in the physical construction world; it's not a lathe. Stop thinking "mud lathe" cause it aint. It's a circular squeezer/pusher/extruder". Clay isn't a material to be used for fabrication; it's a fluid  with a very high viscosity that needs to be reshaped in a desired direction.
  16. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Joseph Fireborn in Instagram   
    Bah, HUMBUG! I hate social media. We don't tweet, cluck, quack or make any other animal sounds. We're just very private people and like to keep some things to ourselves. Too much data being collected on folks presently and now equipment is being installed along the interstate/freeway system to collect bluetooth and GPS signals...like that is actually needed....    ....and I don't need a refrigerator that takes pictures of the inside of itself neither. If I'm too stupid to realize when it's outta food...then I need to go ahead on and starve to death....
  17. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from LeeU in Supplies To Buy When Buying A First Wheel?   
    You aint kidding. Nerd, it doesn't take that much pressure, rather steadiness.  Posture made a huge difference to me too. I raised my wheel up and now throw stadning and it made a huge difference. Here's a homework assignment that's right up your alley. Do some research/testing on what wheel height feels better to you. Start with 4" wheel height increments and see what feels better. Try to center but you dont have to get it right just yet. Comfort is the result you're after. I've worked at work bench heights my whole life so getting the wheel off the floor works better for me. I still have to have some downward angle to my arms though for best results.
     
     
    Watch this, it might help with centering:
  18. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from cloudhutworks in Supplies To Buy When Buying A First Wheel?   
    It's too quiet IMO. Sometimes I just don't realize how fast I'm going until it's too "plate".
  19. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from PotterPutter in Supplies To Buy When Buying A First Wheel?   
    It's too quiet IMO. Sometimes I just don't realize how fast I'm going until it's too "plate".
  20. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Stephen in Just How Old Is Too Old For A Kiln?   
    That's a tough call. IMO pieces of equipment are just like people; everything ages, some more than others. While one individual of a certain vintage may be in poor shape, another may be perfectly fine. I once knew a  man that at 87 could work men half his age "into the shade". What he was capable of doing would most certainly hospitalize, if not kill;  most men that old.
     
    We have a Skutt KS 1227 here from the 70's that was given to us; it's old and beat up but it does work. We used it as an overflow/backup kiln for our production runs and it worked great despite having been put through several firings and being beaten to death by it's previous owner. We got this kiln when we where just stating out. I haven't seen it in years and while it "worked great when last used" (sound familiar?), I couldn't tell you for sure it would go to temp if I pulled it out and fired it again today.
     
     It all comes down to how well it was taken care of, used, stored and what it's like now. My biggest problem with the one you are looking at iis the price. The guy wanted $500 for our "free" kiln and that just wasn't going to happen. (He was a friend of my father and just needed it and all of his molds out of the way so we more or less inherited it)
     
     
    I have the same kiln here as you're looking at but most likely newer (serial # 80484). It was stored in an outdoor screened enclosure next to a body of brackish water. The hinge had to be beat to close (stored open), switches frozen to the point the shafts broke before they would turn (but the sitter switch still works freely). It most likely "worked great" when it was last used too...
     
    Is it worth $375? (I wouldn't have given $3.75)
     
     
    Is the one you're looking at worth $375?  
     
    I dunno; can you show me an 87 y.o man who can swing a 45# chainsaw in 96 degree heat and humidity  for two weeks straight with a smile and joke the whole time?  (In WWII, he literally wore one M1 Garand out dropping Nazis and was well on his way to wearing out a second. He was a man if there ever was one. He was also *the* best, most loving, kind and gentle man I ever knew.)
     
    If you know of such a gentlemen, I would love to buy him a beer....but chances are he aint ev'r had a drop in his life.
     
     
    It all comes down to what kinda shape it's really in. In a worse case, are you willing to pop for $50 each for new switches if they need to be replaced? Why were the elements changed? Was this due to verified wear or were they chasing a problem? I've seen folks throw money at a problem not knowing the difference. It may need something else, so I would factor that in when considering price. It can be made to work if it doesn't, and like Neil said, it's just a matter of; is it worth doing so to you in the end? I've also seen folks greatly underestimate number of firings too. "Four firings" could easily be, and most likely is; 40.
     
     
    The only thing I can tell you with 100% certainty is; you never wanted to be on the business end of "Mr. Smith's" Garand...EVER!...  
     
    (I've have a great story of him with a 30 caliber Browning machine gun while in basic training.)
  21. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Callie Beller Diesel in Complete Beginner And Could Use Some Help.   
    Sculpty tastes like stoneware? Who'da thunk it!
  22. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from glazenerd in Nerd Playing With His New Toy   
    Nerd, you need to sell large giclees of those!
     
     
    Ya know, that new toy, some photoshop and custom printed color ceramic decals could make some CRAZY cool looking stuff!
  23. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from SydneyGee in Artsy Babble Translation Please   
    Doesn't matter what they are saying.
     
    “When art critics get together they talk about Form and Structure and Meaning. When artists get together they talk about where you can buy cheap turpentine.â€
    ― Pablo Picasso
  24. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Stephen in Converting Kiln Sitter Kiln To Electronic Controller   
    Build a stand alone controller that all your other kilns can plug into. The Bartlett V6-CF board is only $219; leave your other board be if you can and buy another to build a stand alone unit. That being said, if you are in a bind, there isn't anything wrong with using a kiln with a functioning sitter for the time being.
     
    It's important to remember that your little kiln draws less power, thus you just can't swap all of the guts over and expect it to run something that draws 48 amps. While I can't say exactly what you will need (seeing I don't know what you have), most likely you'll just have to add two more relays and wires to and from if moving the whole controller over to another kiln. We'd need more info (and coffee) before a more detailed answer can be given.
  25. Like
    No Longer Member got a reaction from Tim T in Home Made Kiln Controller   
    Never said nor implied but the main thing they did is change the industry forever.
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