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1515art

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Everything posted by 1515art

  1. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    Progression 2/6, 7# soldate 60
  2. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    Progression 3/6, 7# soldate 60
  3. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    Progression 4/6, 7# soldate 60
  4. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    Progression 5/6, 7# soldate 60
  5. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    Progression 6/6, 7# soldate 60
  6. 1515art

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    From the album: work at 1515art

  7. Soft clay is much easier to work with, How hard the clay is mostly a matter of preference and how physically strong you are. The more strength you have the dryer the clay you can throw and I think the dryer the better. I've watched Claudio Reginato throw soldate 60 that was as hard as a brick and had been left out of the plastic bag for days drying out in preparation for a throwing workshop and it was still a little soft for his style. But he is incredibly strong from 40 years of throwing 8 hours a day 7 days a week and can handle it, he also uses a special style of wedging to get the clay ready. Normal wedging techniques don't work very well when the clay is very very hard and he uses a technique of slicing the clay, rolling a curve and then slaps the sections back together.
  8. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    Raku w/light copper luster
  9. 1515art

    image

    From the album: work at 1515art

    This picture shows 3rd firing cone 10 with cone 05 clear coat to add depth to the glaze.
  10. The attached chart provides the maximum capacity you can expect to pass through a given steel lines at various length. If you know the maximum cfm required for the rated temperature of the kiln you are planning to use check the chart to see the diameter line needed to handle the volume for standard residential pressures for the distance from the meter to the burners on the kiln.
  11. The front of the kiln has a peep hole, this kiln is fired by baby sitting (closely monitoring) the firing by visually observing the state of the object in the firing chamber during the firing process, monitoring pyrometers or, observing pyrometric cones placed within view of the peep hole.
  12. Small cracks without any gap in the brick that would reduce the actual thickness of the insulation should not be a problem. Larger cracks and voids can be filled with a refractory patch material available at ceramic supply shops or online, the material comes in a couple of different application styles depending on your need.
  13. If this is your kiln it fires off a 120v 15amp so any normal household 20 amp circuit will be fine. Max temp is listed at 2000 F and actual max temp will depend on the useful life remaining in the coil elements, replacement coils should be available online. The kiln if operating properly can be used for anything that will fit inside the firing chamber that reaches maturity within the temperature limits... And while a little hard on the electric elements you could even try to raku fire small pieces, but your kiln probably is best suited for enamel or glass. Also, because your kiln will fire off any indoor 20 amp outlet don't be fooled that it is safe anywhere inside, use it only in well ventilated areas and keep the kiln a safe distance from any combustible items.
  14. I like to use olive oil cooking spray, no health issues and it's good for the skin on your hands. I just spray a bit on whatever stamp, or sprig mold I'm using and dab off the excess with a paper towel.
  15. I usually buy my clay by the ton mostly because the price is so much better, I have a lot of other interests and don't throw as often as I should so my clay gets time to age a bit and I find the more it ages the better it throws as long as you can keep the moisture level where you like it. The clay always comes much to soft from the dealer for me than I like, so 6mos or a year of age all the boxes packed tight together is what I like. My current batch is about 2 years old and very plastic and throws wonderful.
  16. I was a member of a studio some years ago and we were having a problem with the recycled clay cracking like your casserole dishes, the clay was difficult to throw also. Seems the clay barrels had developed a pretty good odor after a few years and one day one of the tech's dumped in just a touch of bleach to freshen things up... Killed all the bacteria and the clay lost most of it's plasticity, we wound up dumping a couple thousand pounds of recycle that had already been pugged and bagged. It might have recovered given enough time I guess, but not really worth keeping it around that long.
  17. I've never had a problem with low temperatures in the range you are experiencing, when it's warm and the air very dry then things can dry to quickly. My studio is not insulated and when it's cool and the air is moist everything just takes forever to dry, when it's summer I cover everything in plastic left over from the dry cleaner laundry, or wax resist depending...
  18. The k cup is great and fits really well in the photo, I like it.
  19. Lisa, if you need a lot of water to throw comfortably, then be diligent about frequently soaking it up and keeping everything as dry as you can while you throw, so you minimize shrinkage and stress. Keeping the clay compressed and dry means less open space as the water evaporates and equals denser clay. No guarantee this is your issue, but is something I always do and I have very good success if I follow this rule. When I don't compress the bottom of the piece while throwing and use excess water I will generally get a crack of some sort. Clark
  20. I've done sets of photos for display together, where I'll use an object like an artificial flower if I don't want to spoil the picture composition with a coin or ruler and establish the relative size vs a coffee cup in one of the pictures. And then use the same flower in every shot I take with each piece of pottery. It's not as clear and obvious as the coin or ruler, but looks nice and gives a standard for scale that's not to hard to figure out.
  21. What clay are you throwing? Using too much water and not keeping the clay compressed enough can lead to more dramatic changes as the piece dries leading to the type of stress cracks you describe.
  22. I've watched the artists work under glazing very large porcelain vessels with cobalt oxides in the factories in China, one of the techniques they use is to first start with a pattern of the design printer (transfer) onto the vessel. The painter then brushes a thin layer of latex over the design and then quickly uses a stylus to scrape the wet laytex off the pot over the design lines. They do this a small area at a time until the entire design is exposed through the laytex mask. When the laytex is throughly dry they brush on the oxide and after the oxide dries they peel off the laytex masking leaving behind very clean lines and very intricate designs. This is all done on green ware and single fired to 1300 c, they have the glaze and under glazes down to a fine science from centuries of trial and error and due to the consistent application of materials and controlled firings achieve very clean results.
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